(Left to right): Richard Etheridge, Rasmus Midgett and John Allen Midgett's busts stand on the background of North Carolina's Outer Banks. Nicknamed the Graveyard of the Atlantic, these waters have been home to shipwrecks and to rescues performed by members of the Life Saving Service and U.S. Coast Guard. U.S. Coast Guard illustration by Petty Officer 3rd Class Joshua Canup.

Standing the watch over the Graveyard of the Atlantic

For hundreds of years, mariners have nicknamed North Carolina’s Outer Banks the “Graveyard of the Atlantic” based on the history of ships lost in its waters. Even for experienced Coast Guard members, traversing the area can prove a difficult task. However, Coast Guard men and women stand the watch, just as the crews before them did.


The Long Blue Line: Buoy Tender White Alder—lost 50 years ago, but not forgotten

On Saturday, December 7, 1968, White Alder was steaming down-bound on the Mississippi River. At approximately 6:30 p.m., it collided with the up-bound motor vessel Helena, a 455-foot Taiwanese freighter. The 133-foot buoy tender sunk in 75 feet of water with three of its crew surviving, the rest entombed in the sunken cutter.


Canadian Steamer Princess Sophia. Photo courtesy of Wikipedia.

Avoiding tragedy 100 years after Princess Sophia sinking

This year marks the 100th anniversary of the sinking of the Canadian passenger steamer Princess Sophia. Princess Sophia had run aground in southeast Alaska and was unable to deploy its lifeboats, taking down with it at least 353 people. Today the Coast Guard conducts modern cruish ship exams placing emphasis on crew proficiency during emergencies to avoid another tragedy like the Princess Sophia.


Family rescued

Dear Coast Guard Family: 10 things that I wish everyone knew about the Coast Guard

Once a month, Coast Guard All Hands will feature “Dear Coast Guard Family,” a column for Coast Guard families by Coast Guard spouse Rachel Conley. This month, Conley write about 10 things she wishes everyone knew about the Coast Guard.


Honor, Respect, Devotion to Duty: Fifth Master Chief Petty Officer of the Coast Guard Allen W. Thiele

Coast Guard chief petty officers are known to make a significant difference in the Coast Guard. But some chiefs, like the fifth Master Chief Petty Officer of the Coast Guard Allen W. Thiele, do more – they leave a legacy.


Our service’s response to the attack on Pearl Harbor

Today, we remember the attack on Pearl Harbor that took the lives of more than 2,000 Americans on Dec. 7, 1941. The Coast Guard immediately offered helping hands and provided support as accustomed and trained to do. Today we use those same principles during times of crisis, and we remain a steady and vigilant organization on which others can depend. Here are just a few examples of how our service reacted that fateful day. These stories remind us that our past has shaped our service.


Coast Guard Museum needs you – Share your ideas!

The Coast Guard is the only branch of the armed services that does not have a national museum to celebrate its importance to the nation and to honor the men and women who serve. Since its inception in 1790, the […]


Honor, Respect, Devotion to Duty: BM1 Michael Jenkins

Honor, Respect, Devotion to Duty: BM1 Michael Jenkins

The “U.S. Coast Guard-An Era of History and Heroism” exhibit, which highlights more than 150 years of Coast Guard history in Clallam County, encompasses Jenkins’ passions for history and for the Coast Guard, as well as his thirst for knowledge and outstanding drive toward devotion to duty.


Honoring living history

Honoring living history

Coast Guard Commandant Adm. Paul Zukunft dedicated a training center within Coast Guard Headquarters in honor of Dr. Olivia Hooker, the first African-American woman in the Coast Guard.


100th anniversay of Modern-Day Coast Guard

Celebrating Coast Guard history: 100th anniversary of the “Act to create the U.S. Coast Guard”

100 years ago today, from his office in the Treasury Building in Washington, D.C., Captain-Commandant Ellsworth P. Bertholf, head of the now-former U.S. Revenue Cutter Service, or USRCS, ordered his Chief Clerk to send telegrams or radio messages to all offices, stations and cutters around the country announcing the official news of the creation of the U.S. Coast Guard.


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