(Left to right): Richard Etheridge, Rasmus Midgett and John Allen Midgett's busts stand on the background of North Carolina's Outer Banks. Nicknamed the Graveyard of the Atlantic, these waters have been home to shipwrecks and to rescues performed by members of the Life Saving Service and U.S. Coast Guard. U.S. Coast Guard illustration by Petty Officer 3rd Class Joshua Canup.

Standing the watch over the Graveyard of the Atlantic

For hundreds of years, mariners have nicknamed North Carolina’s Outer Banks the “Graveyard of the Atlantic” based on the history of ships lost in its waters. Even for experienced Coast Guard members, traversing the area can prove a difficult task. However, Coast Guard men and women stand the watch, just as the crews before them did.


The HMS Bounty, a 180-foot sailboat, shown submerged in the Atlantic Ocean during Hurricane Sandy approximately 90 miles southeast of Hatteras, N.C. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Tim Kuklewski.

Shipmate of the Week – Rescuers of the HMS Bounty

The search and rescue operation to save the crew of HMS Bounty has already become one of the enduring images of Hurricane Sandy, but for 14 men and women who called Bounty home and the families of the two who have not returned it will be the bravery of the rescue crews who willingly put themselves in harm’s way to save those in peril that will last a lifetime.


The boatcrew from Coast Guard Cutter Block Island. From left to right: Petty Officer 3rd Class Anthony Iannizzaro, Petty Officer 3rd Class Chuck Seckinger, Petty Officer 1st Class Matthew Losinger and Petty Officer 2nd Class Justin Mullinax.

Shipmate of the Week – Petty Officers Losinger, Mullinax, Seckinger and Iannizzaro

In the early hours of a June morning, Coast Guard Cutter Block Island was underway off the coast of North Carolina rounding the historically perilous waters off Cape Hatteras, an area frequently referred to as the “Graveyard of the Atlantic.” […]