A law enforcement team from Coast Guard Cutter Bertholf (WMSL-750)consisting of Petty Officer 1st Class Jordan Baptiste, Petty Officer 1st Class Asher Thomas, Petty Officer 2nd Class Jean Latimer, Lt. j.g. Kenji Awamura and Petty Officer 3rd Class Brandon Scott, man the cutter's Over The Horizon (OTH) boat, Nov. 4, 2008, during law enforcement training. Team members train constantly to be proficient in their maritime law enforcement mission. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Henry G. Dunphy.

Research, Development, Test and Evaluation Spotlight: Night vision devices evaluation

The Coast Guard Research, Development, Test and Evaluation Program on behalf of the Office of Boat Forces recently completed a research project on newer night vision technology. As a result of that project, CG-731 developed policy and training that allows qualified Coast Guard pursuit coxswains operating the Coast Guard’s over the horizon cutter boats to use night vision technology in the execution of their missions.


First Class Cadet Evan Twarog

Honor, Respect, Devotion to Duty: First Class Cadet Evan Twarog

Through his own initiative to learn more about geospatial science and geographic information systems, First Class Cadet Evan Twarog learned about crisis mapping and how it can help during emergencies. During Hurricane Harvey, Twarog began working on taking posts from social media asking for help and placing them on a map to give first responders a location to search.


During Arctic Technology Evaluation 2018, the AeroVironment Puma unmanned aircraft system and a Coast Guard unmanned surface vessel were deployed together to test the feasibility of using multiple unmanned systems as a communications link over larger areas. Patrick Ryan, a researcher in the Systems Branch at the Coast Guard Research and Development Center, readies the UAS before launch. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Alexandra Swan.

Research, Development, Test and Evaluation Spotlight: Arctic Technology Evaluation 2018

The Coast Guard’s objectives in the Arctic include advancing U.S. security interests and pursuing responsible stewardship of the area. Two components of that strategy – maritime domain awareness and protection of the delicate environment – were the focus of the Coast Guard Research, Development, Test and Evaluation Program’s 2018 Arctic Technology Evaluation held in late July in Alaska. The event enables the Coast Guard to gain efficiencies by evaluating multiple technologies that have the potential to enhance future Coast Guard operations in harsh environments.


The RDT&E Program has even advanced into working in space-based technologies with the DHS/Coast Guard Polar Scout Program. Two small satellites or “cubesats” capable of detecting transmissions from emergency position indicating radio beacons will be deployed this fall to evaluate their ability to detect and geolocate distress transmission in an Arctic environment and provide signal information to a special network of ground stations.

Coast Guard RDT&E Program celebrates 50 years

During its 50 years of existence, the RDT&E Program has completed research that has been vital to the successful advancement of Coast Guard missions including search and rescue, aids to navigation, spill response, and port and cybersecurity as well as supporting the acquisition of new assets such as the national security cutter, offshore patrol cutter and unmanned aircraft system capability.


U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Oliver Berry (WPC 1124) sails in formation with the Republic of the Marshall Islands Ship Lomor 03 off Kwajalein Atoll, July 3, 2018. The crews rendezvoused en route to Majuro Atoll while the RMI crew conducted the 24-hour escort. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Amanda Levasseur/Released)

Coast Guard Cutter Oliver Berry crew sets new horizons for cutter operations

In July, Oliver Berry’s crew set a new milestone by deploying over the horizon to the Republic of the Marshall Islands. The 4,400 nautical mile trip marked marking the furthest deployment of an FRC to date for the Coast Guard and is the first deployment of its kind in the Pacific.


Fire boat response crews battle the blazing remnants of the off shore oil rig Deepwater Horizon, April 21, 2010. A Coast Guard MH-65C dolphin rescue helicopter and crew document the fire aboard the mobile offshore drilling unit Deepwater Horizon, while searching for survivors April 21. Multiple Coast Guard helicopters, planes and cutters responded to rescue the Deepwater Horizon's 126 person crew. U.S. Coast Guard photo.

The Long Blue Line: local enforcer to global responder—nearly 230 years of Coast Guard evolution!

In 1790, Alexander Hamilton established a small fleet of coastal law enforcement vessels to patrol off East Coast seaports. Over the next 228 years, the service experienced rapid growth in its geographic area of responsibility, mandated missions, and organization through mergers with other maritime services, reorganizations, and transfers from one federal agency to another. These frequent changes demanded remarkable flexibility and resourcefulness of the Coast Guard. The service has lived-up to its motto Semper Paratus by adapting and evolving to meet the nation’s changing needs emerging as a global responder known and respected at home and abroad.


Petty Officer 1st Class Kevin Spratt, a boatswain's mate stationed on the Coast Guard Cutter SPAR, displays his hammer hook invention in Kodiak, Alaska, April 12, 2018. Spratt combined two tools commonly used by crew members working on a buoy deck, a chain hook and a maul, which allowed for a safer working environment by de-cluttering the buoy deck. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Lauren Dean.

Innovation from a life at sea

The crews aboard buoy tenders like Coast Guard Cutter SPAR, homeported in Kodiak, Alaska, use both sledgehammers and hooks to work on buoys but with so many tools, wouldn’t it make sense to combine? That’s exactly what Petty Officer 1st Class Kevin Spratt that earned him the 2017 Capt. Niels P. Thomsen Innovation Award after coming up with the hammer hook.


Research, Development, Test and Evaluation Spotlight: Innovation Awards

The Coast Guard Innovation Council assesses and provides strategic guidance on emerging technologies, missions, gaps, challenges and requirements. Recently, 12 Coast Guard members were honored for ideas that significantly impacted the service’s operations with the Capt. Niels P. Thomsen Innovation Awards during the Senior Leadership Conference held at Coast Guard Headquarters in Washington, D.C.


Coast Guard Academy mechanical engineering cadets test out their rescue basket design at a local simulator facility, April 18, 2018. They have been prototyping a new and improved rescue basket, which could revolutionize the way the Coast Guard conducts search-and-rescue missions aboard the MH-60 Jayhawk helicopters. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Nicole Foguth.

Raising the bar in a single hoist

Coast Guard Academy mechanical engineering cadets have been prototyping a new and improved rescue basket, which could revolutionize the way the Coast Guard conducts search-and-rescue missions aboard the MH-60 Jayhawk helicopters. The new design, which is roomy enough for two individuals to comfortably sit in the basket, allows Coast Guard operators to shave off precious time during mass rescue situations.


More than 30 students from the Coast Guard Academy, U.S. Air Force Academy, U.S. Miltiary Academy and U.S. Naval Academy and staff pose for a photo on the steps of Satterlee Hall at the Coast Guard Academy in New London, Conn., April 12, 2018.

Fixing the Coast Guard with math

Each year the Coast Guard presents capstone problems to Coast Guard Academy cadets to help solve centric problems from operation units like aircraft inventory costs, training assignments, cutter operations, etc. During the 2018 Service Academy Student Mathematics Conference held at the Coast Guard Academy in New London, Connecticut, 30 cadets and midshipmen presented their senior research projects to an audience of peers. These projects allowed students to gain real world experience during their final semester and an opportunity to provide solutions that would have a substantial effect on the service.


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