Coast Guard Academy cadets in the Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering Department test out their ship design in a water-testing tank at the Academy as part of their capstone project, Feb. 14, 2019. Their capstone project is to design a replacement Waterways Commerce Cutter to ensure these vital trade routes can be cost effectively maintained through future generations. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Lauren Laughlin

Tomorrow’s leaders designing tomorrow’s ships

The Coast Guard relies upon a fleet of 31 inland river buoy tenders averaging 52 years old, becoming increasingly expensive to maintain and sustain operations that support 2.3 billion tons of waterborne commerce along the U.S. Marine Transportation System. As part of the Coast Guard Academy’s capstone requirements, a group of cadets have been working in partnership with the Coast Guard Office of Ship Design to improve and replace the Waterways Commerce Cutter.


Coast Guard Commandant Adm. Karl Schultz congratulates Mr. Albert Curry, Jr., Deputy Assistant Commandant for the Engineering and Logistics, during the 14th Annual Stars and stripes event in Washington, D.C., Feb. 8, 2019. The event honors members who have served with distinction supporting the Service’s efforts in mentorship, diversity, and value-based service to the Nation, and provides an opportunity for military and defense leaders in the STEM to increase interest in and passion for STEM. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Jetta Disco.

U.S. Coast Guard “At the Intersection of America’s Future”

The Coast Guard stood at the “Intersection of America’s Future” in early February to honor several awardees of the Black Engineer of the Year Award ceremony. The conference brought together 12,000 STEM professionals from across the nation to inspire young Americans to pursue an engineering education and to recognize the achievements of senior military leaders within the STEM professions.


The satellite communications ground station sits on the roof of Smith Hall at the U.S. Coast Guard Academy in New London, Conn. The main feature inside the radome is a 3-meter diameter parabolic dish antenna and communications components that ensure proper signals are transmitted to and received from the satellite. U.S. Coast Guard illustration by Petty Officer 2nd Class Lauren Laughlin.

Developing the way for a Coast Guard space program

There is a new landmark at the Coast Guard Academy and it is helping to launch the Coast Guard into an era of space operations.

The satellite communications ground station on the roof of Smith Hall was built by the Coast Guard Research and Development Center to support the Department of Homeland Security Science and Technology Polar Scout project, which successfully launched two CubeSats in December 2018, and will soon support a broad range of educational opportunities for cadets.


Historians believe this to be a rendering of the cutter Pickering. If so, it is the earliest known rendering of a U.S. revenue cutter. Illustration courtesy of Coast Guard Historian’s Office.

The Long Blue Line: Combat Cutter Pickering—lost 220 years ago, now an OPC namesake

During the Quasi War, U.S. naval authorities considered the Pickering one of their finest combat cutters. Today, 220 years later, Pickering will be recognized and remembered as one of the Coast Guard’s newest class of cutters. The cuttermen of Pickering and their heroic cutter will always remain a part of the long blue line.


Research, Development, Test and Evaluation Spotlight: Polar Scout Program Launches

The Coast Guard Research, Development, Test and Evaluation Program and the Department of Homeland Security Science and Technology Directorate partnered together to test the capabilities of small, inexpensive satellites – known as CubeSats – through the Polar Scout Project, including the launch of two CubeSats. The results of these tests will help improve communication in the Arctic environment, monitoring large areas for illegal activity, and helping to locate persons in distress at sea.


The Coast Guard Electronic Charts Team receives the Award for Excellence from Department of Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen M. Nielsen at the DHS annual awards ceremony in Washington, D.C., Nov. 7, 2018. (From the left) Secretary Nielsen, Lt. Cmdr. Matthew Walter, Mike Sollosi, Courtney Mallon, Stephen Jones, Douglas Scheffler and Acting Deputy Department of Homeland Security Secretary Claire M. Grady display the DHS Award for Excellence. Department of Homeland Security photo by Tim Godbee.

Honor, Respect, Devotion to Duty: Electronic Charts Team

Congratulations to the U.S. Coast Guard’s Electronic Charts Team for your accomplishments and earning the DHS Award for Excellence! The team is part of the service’s efforts to make American waterways safer, more efficient and more resilient by helping the Coast Guard make a decision that allows mariners to meet legal obligations without paper charts. This decision is estimated to save the maritime industry more than 450,000 hours and $30.5 million a year over 10 years.


Research, Development, Test and Evaluation Spotlight: Symposium investigates energy and maritime risk

The Coast Guard is partnering with academia, industry and government to provide cutting-edge training, education and awareness to its workforce. To aid those efforts, the Coast Guard Research, Development, Test and Evaluation Program is co-hosting the annual Maritime Risk Symposium with Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the National Academy of Science – Transportation Research Board. This year’s event is scheduled to be held Nov. 14-16, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Oak Ridge, Tennessee.


Canadian Steamer Princess Sophia. Photo courtesy of Wikipedia.

Avoiding tragedy 100 years after Princess Sophia sinking

This year marks the 100th anniversary of the sinking of the Canadian passenger steamer Princess Sophia. Princess Sophia had run aground in southeast Alaska and was unable to deploy its lifeboats, taking down with it at least 353 people. Today the Coast Guard conducts modern cruish ship exams placing emphasis on crew proficiency during emergencies to avoid another tragedy like the Princess Sophia.


Dr. Jason Gobat of the Applied Physics Laboratory at the University of Washington,, Oct. 3, 2018, about 715 miles north of Barrow, Alaska. Gobat is the lead engineer who designed, built and programmed a series of sea gliders, which are autonomous submarines used to measure water conductivity, temperature, depth, oxygen and other measurements in the Arctic Ocean. Once deployed, the sea gliders are controlled by pilots at the Applied Physics Lab at the University of Washington in Seattle. Approximately 30 scientists are aboard the Healy to study stratified ocean dynamics and how environmental factors affect the water below the ice surface for the Office of Naval Research. The Healy is one of two ice breakers in U.S. service and is the only military ship dedicated to conducting ice research in the Arctic. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Senior Chief Petty Officer NyxoLyno Cangemi.

From kitchen timers to autonomous Seagliders™

In September, Dr. Jason Gobat and a team of about 30 engineers and scientists deployed aboard the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Healy in support of a departmental research initiative for the Office of Naval Research. The project, led by friend and colleague Dr. Craig Lee, attempts to better understand how the Arctic ice, atmosphere and water interact. This team deployed sea gliders to help them measure water conductivity, temperature, depth and oxygen.


The U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Healy (WAGB-20) in the ice, Oct. 3, 2018, about 715 miles north of Barrow, Alaska, in the Arctic. The Healy is in the Arctic with a team of about 30 scientists and engineers aboard deploying sensors and autonomous submarines to study stratified ocean dynamics and how environmental factors affect the water below the ice surface for the Office of Naval Research. The Healy, which is homeported in Seattle, is one of two ice breakers in U.S. service and is the only military ship dedicated to conducting research in the Arctic. U.S. Coast Guard photo by NyxoLyno Cangemi.

Coast Guard icebreaker crew completes second 2018 Arctic mission

The crew of the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Healy completed their second mission of their Arctic West Summer 2018 deployment Thursday, Oct. 18. Mission 1802 was a scientific mission to study stratified ocean dynamics in the Arctic (SODA) for the Office of Naval Research. Healy is one of two icebreakers in U.S. service that serves American interests in the region helping us better understand, plan and prepare for increased human activity.


Next Page »