Locals wave for help in the central highlands of Puerto Rico. U.S. Coast Guard photo.

The Long Blue Line: “Semper Paratus”—Coast Guard men and women in Hurricane Maria

U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliarist J. Edwin Nieves compiled oral histories from Coast Guard members who responded in the wake of Hurricane Maria in San Juan, Puerto Rico. Every one of these recorded oral histories proved compelling and revealed the commitment to service, devotion to duty and willingness to make sacrifices that characterizes the Coast Guard and the Coast Guard community. Each of the interviewees made sacrifices for others and endured personal privations.


Adm. Karl Schultz, Coast Guard commandant, salutes during the commissioning of Coast Guard Cutter Terrell Horne at Coast Guard Base Los Angeles-Long Beach, Calif., March 22, 2019. USCGC Terrell Horne is the third Fast Response Cutter to be homeported at Coast Guard Base Los Angeles-Long Beach and will operate throughout the 11th Coast Guard District, which includes all of California and international waters off Mexico and Central America. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Cory J. Mendenhall.

A Fitting Tribute: The commissioning of Coast Guard Cutter Terrell Horne

In 2012, Senior Chief Petty Officer Terrell Horne III made the ultimate sacrifice to save the life of his coxswain during a law enforcement mission that ended in a collision off the coast of Southern California. On March 21, 2019, the Coast Guard paid tribute to Horne by commissioning the Coast Guard’s newest Fast Response Cutter in his name. This new cutter honors his bravery, dedication and spirit of public service.


Danny Hahn mans the Central Tool Room at the Coast Guard Yard in Curtis Bay, Md. U.S. Coast Guard photo.

The Long Blue Line: Danny Hahn

Daniel “Danny” Hahn came from a family long associated with the Coast Guard Yard in Curtis Bay, Maryland. He served 50 years continuously at the Yard and set the record as the longest-serving wage grade civilian in Coast Guard history. He died in 2017 but will always be remembered as a hard-working Coast Guard civilian who served with distinction as a member of the long blue line.


Photograph of the 165-foot cutter Icarus. (U.S. Coast Guard)

The Long Blue Line: Icarus – WWII combat cutter, OPC namesake

In 1942, the crew of Coast Guard Cutter Icarus, commanded by Lt. Maurice Jester, sank German U-352 off the coast of North Carolina. Shortly after sinking, the Coast Guard crew rescued 33 survivors of the 48-man crew – they were the first enemy combatants captured by U.S. forces in World War II. The cutter was decommissioned in 1948 but will soon live on as the namesake of the sixth in the first flight of Offshore Patrol Cutters in the “Heritage”-class.


Cutter Argo (WPC-100) on patrol. Originally designed for Prohibition law enforcement, this type of cutter was particularly seaworthy and maneuverable. With the U.S. entry into World War II, Argo was attached to the Atlantic Fleet as a convoy escort vessel. U.S. Coast Guard photo.

The Long Blue Line: A wartime rescue by Cutter Argo 75 years ago

It’s been 75 years since the wartime search and rescue efforts of the cutter Argo but it will forever remain a chapter in the saga of the long blue line. Cutters Argo and Thetis were part of a convoy off Cape May, New Jersey, when American tanker Camas Meadows steamed unescorted by an inexperienced crew, fatally rammed a Navy patrol gunboat. Argo’s officer of the day activated a search and rescue operation and rescued 23 survivors – 106 crew members of the Navy gunboat were lost.


The 22-acre Alcatraz Island is visited by approximately 1,750,000 tourists a year. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Barry Bena.

Legacy of Light: Oldest west coast light marks ‘The Rock’

The Alcatraz Lighthouse not only guides mariners through the San Francisco Bay but also welcomes tourists to the island that used to house America’s most notorious inmates. Alcatraz Island was first used for a fort and military prison before becoming the most famous and formidable federal penitentiary in the nation. Today, members of Coast Guard Aids to Navigation Team (ANT) San Francisco keep the famous Bay Area light shining.


The Journalist rating

2018 marks the 70th anniversary of the creation of the Journalist rating, a predecessor rating of the current Public Affairs Specialist rating. Today there are approximately 76 Public Affairs Specialists on active duty who manage the Coast Guard’s day-to-day external communications and deploy to major incidents to conduct public information campaigns.


Photo of the Cape Elizabeth Lighthouse, also known as Two Lights, near Portland, Maine. (Wikipedia)

The Long Blue Line: Hanna – the service’s forgotten Medal of Honor hero

Many with knowledge of service history believe Guadalcanal hero Douglas Munro was the Coast Guard’s first and only recipient of the Medal of Honor. Technically, they would be wrong. In fact, Lighthouse Keeper Marcus Aurelius Hanna also received the Medal of Honor, the U.S. military’s highest recognition for combat heroism.


Picture of the medium endurance cutter Diligence VI landing an HH-52 helicopter in the late-20th century. (U.S. Coast Guard)

The Long Blue Line: Diligence – historic cutter, OPC namesake

Coast Guard Cutter Diligence, also known as “Dillie Devils,” “Dili-O” and “The Dog,” has served this nation since its commissioning in 1964. This is the sixth vessel in service history to bear the unique distinction of “Diligence” and not the last. The Coast Guard will soon build the “Heritage”-Class of 360-foot Offshore Patrol Cutters with Diligence as the 10th in the first flight of OPCs.


A wreath to honor five Coast Guard members who lost their lives 87-year ago is prepared before a memorial service held by Coast Guard Station Atlantic City members at the Absecon Lighthouse in Atlantic City, New Jersey on March 6, 2019. On March 6, 1932, five members of Coast Guard Lifeboat Station Atlantic City attempted to search for a missing fishing boat in a nor’easter off Atlantic City, which resulted in the death of five crew members. Photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Seth Johnson

Coast Guard remembers fallen shipmates in Atlantic City rescue tragedy of 1932

On March 6, 1932, five Coast Guardsmen lost their lives while attempting to assist a fishing boat off the coast of Atlantic City, N.J. The ripples from the tragedy are still felt today as members of Coast Guard Station Atlantic City hold an annual memorial and wreath laying ceremony.

“We hold this memorial annually to remember and honor those who gave their lives in service, and who are part of our proud heritage as lifesavers and as Coast Guard men and women.” – Lt. Taylor Smith


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