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Out of his native element: El Paso native trades desert sands for Arctic waters

Wednesday, October 24, 2018

U.S. Coast Guard Petty Officer 1st Class Sean Carrillo, 37, of El Paso, Texas, poses for a photograph, Oct. 7, 2018, approximately 650 north of Barrow, Alaska. Carrillo is a marine science technician stationed aboard the Coast Guard Cutter Healy (WAGB-20) and serves as a liaison between the ship's command cadre and a team of scientists conducting research in the arctic. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Senior Chief Petty Officer NyxoLyno Cangemi.

In 2015, Petty Officer 1st Class Sean Carrillo, a marine science technician, stepped off a 420-foot icebreaker and onto the North Pole for the first time. The barren and frigid landscape was vastly different from the desert sands he grew up with more than 4,000 miles away in El Paso, Texas. Due to a bad back, Carrillo deviated from law enforcement to marine science, which eventually led him to join the small community of Arctic blue nose polar bear sailors.

Vermont native takes on the Arctic ice

Monday, October 22, 2018

U.S. Coast Guard Petty Officer 3rd Class Shannon Eubanks poses for a photograph, Oct. 3, 2018, about 715 miles north of Barrow, Alaska, in the Arctic. Eubanks is a crew member aboard the Coast Guard Cutter Healy (WAGB-20) and serves on the ice rescue team to protect crew members and scientists conducting work in the Arctic. The Healy is underway in the Arctic with about 100 crew members and 30 scientists to deploy sensors and semi-autonomous submarines to study stratified ocean dynamics and how environmental factors affect the water below the ice surface for the Office of Naval Research. The Healy, which is homeported in Seattle, is one of two ice breakers in U.S. service and is the only military ship dedicated to conducting research in the Arctic. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Senior Chief Petty Officer NyxoLyno Cangemi.

When Shannon Eubanks graduated high school in Barton, Vermont, she did so surrounded by people she had grown up with for years. Little did she know at the time, she would later surround herself with a similar close-knit group of people on a polar icebreaker in the Arctic Ocean. Each summer, Eubanks deploys in the Arctic with a team of scientists to assist them in conducting scientific research. As a boatswain’s mate aboard the ship, she is in charge of piloting the ship’s small boats, standing watch on the ship’s bridge and supervising a small workforce of enlisted members. With the lives and safety of her fellow shipmates at stake, it’s a responsibility Eubanks doesn’t take lightly.

Coast Guard icebreaker crew completes second 2018 Arctic mission

Friday, October 19, 2018

The U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Healy (WAGB-20) in the ice, Oct. 3, 2018, about 715 miles north of Barrow, Alaska, in the Arctic. The Healy is in the Arctic with a team of about 30 scientists and engineers aboard deploying sensors and autonomous submarines to study stratified ocean dynamics and how environmental factors affect the water below the ice surface for the Office of Naval Research. The Healy, which is homeported in Seattle, is one of two ice breakers in U.S. service and is the only military ship dedicated to conducting research in the Arctic. U.S. Coast Guard photo by NyxoLyno Cangemi.

The crew of the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Healy completed their second mission of their Arctic West Summer 2018 deployment Thursday, Oct. 18. Mission 1802 was a scientific mission to study stratified ocean dynamics in the Arctic (SODA) for the Office of Naval Research. Healy is one of two icebreakers in U.S. service that serves American interests in the region helping us better understand, plan and prepare for increased human activity.

Research, Development, Test and Evaluation Spotlight: Arctic Technology Evaluation 2018

Tuesday, September 11, 2018

During Arctic Technology Evaluation 2018, the AeroVironment Puma unmanned aircraft system and a Coast Guard unmanned surface vessel were deployed together to test the feasibility of using multiple unmanned systems as a communications link over larger areas. Patrick Ryan, a researcher in the Systems Branch at the Coast Guard Research and Development Center, readies the UAS before launch. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Alexandra Swan.

The Coast Guard’s objectives in the Arctic include advancing U.S. security interests and pursuing responsible stewardship of the area. Two components of that strategy – maritime domain awareness and protection of the delicate environment – were the focus of the Coast Guard Research, Development, Test and Evaluation Program’s 2018 Arctic Technology Evaluation held in late July in Alaska. The event enables the Coast Guard to gain efficiencies by evaluating multiple technologies that have the potential to enhance future Coast Guard operations in harsh environments.

Designing the Coast Guard’s role in the Arctic

Monday, April 9, 2018

The Coast Guard’s missions in the Arctic are evolving with the changing landscape. Six teams of Coast Guard Academy cadets have been working on their capstone projects exploring and designing icebreakers capable of operating in both the Arctic and Great Lakes, as well as applying conceptual understanding of the Arctic domain to build foundational relationships between Arctic nations.

U.S. icebreaker completes Antarctica operation despite engineering challenges

Wednesday, February 14, 2018

The Coast Guard Cutter Polar Star breaks ice in McMurdo Sound near Antarctica, Jan. 13, 2018. The crew of the Seattle-based Polar Star is on deployment to Antarctica in support of Operation Deep Freeze 2018, the U.S. military’s contribution to the National Science Foundation-managed U.S. Antarctic Program. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Chief Petty Officer Nick Ameen.

The crew of U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Polar Star completed their mission in support of National Science Foundation (NSF) after cutting a resupply channel through 15 miles of Antarctic ice in the Ross Sea and escorting supply vessels to the continent. Despite flooding in the engine room and one of the three turbines failing, the crew was able to continue and complete their mission in the ice to allow resupply ships to get to McMurdo Station.

Research, Development, Testing and Evaluation: Arctic Navigational Safety Information System

Tuesday, November 14, 2017

The crew of U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Maple follows the crew of Canadian Coast Guard Icebreaker Terry Fox, Aug. 12, 2017, during Maple’s 2017 Northwest Passage transit. As maritime traffic in the area increases, a Coast Guard Research and Development Center project seeks a reliable means of providing critical navigational safety information such as hazards, chart corrections and weather to Arctic mariners via digital means. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Nate Littlejohn.

Mariners face a multitude of hazards in the Arctic. The extensive seasonal melting of sea ice, reduction of multi-year ice and increase in first-year ice throughout the Arctic has generated an increase in maritime traffic. To help mitigate some of the risks associated with that increase, the Coast Guard has partnered with the Marine Exchange of Alaska (MXAK) to provide critical navigational safety information to Arctic mariners via digital means.

Historic exercise tests search and rescue capabilities in the Arctic

Tuesday, October 24, 2017

From left to right, multipurpose offshore patrol vessel ICGV Thor (Iceland), frigate HDMS Vaedderen (Denmark, medium river icebreaker CCGS Pierre Radisson (Canada), medium endurance U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Spencer, and offshore patrol vessel NOCGV Andenes (Norway) sail in formation during exercise "Arctic Guardian 2017." U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Frank Iannazzo-Simmons.

The Arctic Coast Guard Forum consisting of members from Canada, Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, Sweden, the Russian Federation and the United States coordinated an exercise to test search and rescue capabilities in the Arctic. The “Arctic Guardian 2017” exercises took place in Reykjavik, Iceland, testing cooperation, coordination, and communication across partner nations’ rescue coordination centers.

Allies in the Arctic

Monday, September 18, 2017

The crew of U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Maple follows the crew of Canadian coast guard icebreaker Terry Fox through the icy waters of Franklin Strait, in Nunavut, Canada, Aug. 12, 2017. The Canadian coast guard assisted Maple's crew by breaking and helping navigate through ice during several days of Maple's 2017 Northwest Passage transit. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Nate Littlejohn.

The Canadian coast guard assisted the crew of Coast Guard Cutter Maple by breaking and helping navigate through ice during several days of Maple’s 2017 Northwest Passage transit. This is the 60th anniversary of the last transit by a Coast Guard cutter, and 150th anniversary of the Coast Guard’s presence in Alaska.

Coast Guard and America’s future as an Arctic nation

Wednesday, March 29, 2017

Gov. Christine Todd Whitman recently visited the U.S. Coast Guard Academy to speak about leadership and the Coast Guard’s future in the Arctic, during the 22nd annual Coast Guard Foundation Hedrick Fellowship.

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