Coast Guard Boats

A small boat crew returns from the SEMAR Independencia with Mexican Navy sailors aboard for a partnership meeting on the Coast Guard Cutter Dauntless in the Gulf of Mexico, Mar 11, 2017. The visit's intent was to have a friendly exchanging of ideas and best practices for the shared responsibility of maritime security between the Coast Guard and Mexican Navy. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Dustin R. Williams

A boat crew returns from the SEMAR Independencia with Mexican navy sailors aboard for a partnership meeting on the Coast Guard Cutter Dauntless in the Gulf of Mexico, Mar 11, 2017. The visit’s intent was to have a friendly exchanging of ideas and best practices for the shared responsibility of maritime security between the Coast Guard and Mexican navy. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Dustin R. Williams.

The nation first established a “Boat Forces” program in 1878, with the creation of the United States Life Saving Service (USLSS) by an act of Congress. The USLSS was charged with rescuing mariners in distress along the coasts of the United States. In 1915, the USLSS merged with the United States Revenue Cutter Service (established in 1790) to form the modern-day United States Coast Guard. Since that time, Coast Guardsmen have continually been called upon by the nation to exercise their skill in boat handling and coastal navigation – both in peacetime and war.

Response Boats

The Coast Guard’s response boats typically operate from Coast Guard Stations (STA) located along the coastlines of the United States including the Great Lakes, Alaska, Hawaii, and Guam.

 

Aids to Navigation Boats

Aids to Navigation (ATON) Boats are industrial platforms used by the Coast Guard to maintain the buoys, day boards, ranges, and other fixed aids along America’s “maritime highways.”

  • 64’/55′ Aids to Navigation Boats (ANB)
  • 49′ Stern-Loading Buoy Boat (BUSL)
  • 26′ Trailerable Aids to Navigation Boat (TANB)
  • 20′ ATON Boat – Small (AB-S)
  • 16′ ATON Boat – Skiff (AB-SKF)

 

Cutter Boats

Cutter Boats are carried onboard Coast Guard Cutters, and are typically launched from davits or stern ramps. All cutters have at least one boat.

  • 35′ Long-Range Interceptor II (LRI-II)
  • 26′ Cutterboat – Over the Horizon IV (CB-OTH-IV)
  • 24′ Cutterboat – Large (CB-L)
  • 24′ Cutterboat ATON – Large (CB-ATON-L)
  • 18′ Cutterboat ATON – Medium (CB-ATON-M)
  • 18′ Cutterboat – Medium (CB-M)

 

Crew members of Coast Guard Station Channel Islands Harbor, California, train using the station's new 29-foot response boat small (RBS-II), Feb. 27, 2013. The RBS-II replaced the station's aging boats. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Seth Johnson.

Crew members of Coast Guard Station Channel Islands Harbor, Calif., train using the station’s new 29-foot response boat small (RBS-II), Feb. 27, 2013. The RBS-II replaced the station’s aging boats. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Seth Johnson.

Small Boat Product Line

On Oct. 1, 2008, the Small Boat Product Line (SBPL) was established as the first surface product line to modernize assets using the Mission Support Business Model. The SBPL aligns all boat support resources under a single point of accountability for maintenance, engineering and logistics for all boats in the Coast Guard. The PL organization is geographically distributed across the U.S., with the majority of the staff in Baltimore, Norfolk, Virginia, and Oakland, California.

PL members are also assigned remotely as port engineers and responders at Coast Guard bases supporting boats in their assigned regions. We work with the other product lines and support divisions to provide efficient, effective and consistent processes for all of our units to maintain and continuously improve mission support.

Centralized Cutter Boat Pooling

Leveraging the innovative and strategic planning of the Small Boat Product Line, the concept of pooling boats became a reality. Prior to the implementation of the Centralized Cutter Boat Pooling (CCBP) program, each cutter was permanently assigned a CB-OTH and was wholly responsible for the operation and maintenance of that asset. The cutter funded all parts and services under $500, and requested assistance and funding from the Small Boat Product Line for parts and services in excess of $500. Several spare CB-OTH existed and were used in case of severe casualties, but there was no depot level activity or process in place to facilitate maintenance and transfer of these spares.

CB-OTHs and their complex systems are man-power intensive and expensive to maintain. Cutter crews were required to perform 200 man-hours of scheduled maintenance tasks annually in addition to extensive daily care tasks and corrective maintenance required by rigorous use. The Centralized Cutter Boat Pooling program offers significant advantages over traditional boat maintenance for both the operational and sustainment communities.

SFLC provides direct support to 1,718 boats and other assigned assets with depot level maintenance, engineering, supply, logistics, and information services to support Coast Guard missions.

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