Honor, Respect, Devotion to Duty: MK2 Matthew Hamson

Petty Officer 2nd Class Matthew Hamson, a machinery technician, has been a crucial part of the decommissioning of Coast Guard Cutter Rush. He is currently training the Bangladesh Navy, who will take ownership of the cutter later this summer. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Barry Bena.

Petty Officer 2nd Class Matthew Hamson, a machinery technician, has been a crucial part of the decommissioning of Coast Guard Cutter Rush. He is currently training the Bangladesh Navy, who will take ownership of the cutter later this summer. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Barry Bena.

 

Coast Guard Cutter Rush retired from duty earlier this year after 45 years of faithful service to the Nation. Throughout the cutter’s 45-year history, one thing remained constant: the Coast Guard men and women that served day in and day out, ensuring the cutter remained ‘Always Ready’ to answer the call.

Petty Officer 2nd Class Matthew Hamson, a machinery technician, is no different. During his time aboard Coast Guard Cutter Rush, Hamson became an expert at the cutter’s propulsion and machinery systems from his experience working in the main propulsion division within the engineering department.

“[Petty Officer Hamson] is a top performer within main propulsion division,” said Chief Warrant Officer Justin Hugus, Hamson’s supervisor. “He has achieved milestones that aren’t normally required of as second class.”

Hamson stretched his qualifications above and beyond every expectation, earning the engineer of the watch qualification, a position normally reserved higher ranking Coast Guard members aboard the cutter.

Leading up to the cutter’s decommissioning, Hamson was an integral part of each and every phase the cutter endured. He developed a work list, identifying key items that needed to be done prior to the decommissioning.

He became so knowledgeable about each and every system pertaining to propulsion and machinery, that he was asked to stick around for an additional phase: to assist in the training of the next crew to serve aboard Cutter Rush.

But he wasn’t training other Coast Guard men and women with similar expertise. In fact, he was training people who had never even stepped foot aboard a 378-foot high endurance cutter before – members of the Bangladesh Navy.

Petty Officer 2nd Class Matthew Hamson, a machinery technician, trains the Bangladesh  Navy on crucial propulsion systems prior to the transfer of Coast Guard Cutter Rush. U.S. Coast Guard photo.

Petty Officer 2nd Class Matthew Hamson, a machinery technician, trains members of the Bangladesh Navy on crucial propulsion systems prior to the transfer of Coast Guard Cutter Rush. U.S. Coast Guard photo.

During this phase, which began at the beginning of May and will run through June 19, the normal main propulsion division of 16 Coast Guard members was diminished to just two – Hamson and his supervisor, Hugus. Hamson is now responsible for training the Bangladesh Navy on each and every system within the cutter’s engine room.

The two are training the new crew of roughly 18 people, and Hamson is directly responsible for training the equivalent ranks of chief petty officer and below.

“It’s been an experience,” Hamson said. “I was given the opportunity to do this and it’s been fun.”

The training begins with training the new crew on system functions, which includes identifying key components within each system. For example, with the gas turbines onboard the cutter, Hamson is responsible for training the Bangladesh Navy on the system as a whole, the key components of the system, the theory of operation, how to actually operate and manage the turbines and the regular maintenance that needs to be conducted.

“We’re talking about some critical key components of propulsion, especially when we talk about the main diesel engines and the turbines,” said Hugus. “He’s directly involved in establishing knowledge with that and training them to actually operate it and become operators within the systems.”

Hugus attributes Hamson’s personality to his success in training this new crew.

“He’s a very soft-spoken, very easy going personality, and I think that personality plays a key role in establishing effective communications that are needed when we’re training a foreign Navy within components,” Hugus said.

Hamson said his favorite part of the training isn’t necessarily teaching them the individual systems, but getting to know each and every individual that will operate Coast Guard Cutter Rush once it moves to it’s new homeport in Bangladesh.

And even though Hamson has shined in this recent training, Hugus says it’s no different than his every day performance.

“He’s a stellar performer,” said Hugus. “He’s an outstanding person and has been the go-to guy on the ship over the two years I have been aboard.”

Petty Officer 2nd Class Matthew Hamson, a machinery technician, trains the Bangladesh Navy on crucial propulsion systems prior to the transfer of Coast Guard Cutter Rush. U.S. Coast Guard photo.

Petty Officer 2nd Class Matthew Hamson, a machinery technician, trains members of the Bangladesh Navy on crucial propulsion systems prior to the transfer of Coast Guard Cutter Rush. U.S. Coast Guard photo.

Do you know someone who embodies the Coast Guard Core Values of Honor, Respect, Devotion to Duty? Please submit your nominations using the “Submit Ideas” link on the right.

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