Shipmate of the Week – MK2 Ryan Horsley

U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Sherman pulls into homeport in San Diego, March 14, 2014. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Connie Terrell.

U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Sherman pulls into homeport in San Diego, March 14, 2014. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Connie Terrell.

Coast Guard Cutter Sherman returned to homeport last week after a 50-day deployment to disrupt illicit and illegal activity from reaching the shores of the United States. As the crew patrolled international waters off the coasts of Central and South America, Sherman’s crew intercepted thousands of pounds of cocaine destined for the United States.

While there were plenty of accomplishments at sea – including one interdiction where suspects threw their contraband overboard and a helicopter crew fired warning and engine-disabling shots – it was the men and women below deck who were making the mission execution possible. One of the engine room’s standouts was Petty Officer 2nd Class Ryan Horsley.

Petty Officer 2nd Class Ryan Horsley is a key member of Coast Guard Cutter Sherman’s main propulsion division. U.S. Coast Guard photo.

Petty Officer 2nd Class Ryan Horsley is a key member of Coast Guard Cutter Sherman’s main propulsion division. U.S. Coast Guard photo.

Horsley is a key member of Sherman’s main propulsion division. His primary duties include the operation and preservation of propulsion equipment to include work on the main gas turbines, main diesel engines, electrical generation, ships service diesel generators and ships evaporator. For those not familiar with such engineering-specific terms, Horsley’s roles and responsibilities means he keeps the ship running.

“MK2 is my right hand man if there is anything I need he will step up and ensure the task is completed,” said Petty Officer 1st Class Craig Aldinger. “MK2 Horsley is an outstanding MK2 and is willing to help anyone in any department. He is very outgoing and is great to get along with.”

Horsley’s qualifications are as varied as the engineering systems aboard the cutter. His current qualifications include basic and advanced damage control, inport and underway security, auxiliary watchstander, machinery watchstander and throttleman. He used this unique set of qualifications to tackle a major engineering hurdle – the need for fresh water.

While on patrol, the cutter was having problems with their evaporator, a component that produces distilled water for the crew.

“We were consuming far more water than we were making despite already being in very strict water conservation and if things didn’t change then we would have been in big trouble and potentially had to go back in port,” said Petty Officer 3rd Class Callan Leonard.

Petty Officer 2nd Class Ryan Horsley is also a member of the engineering training team and conducted more than 130 basic casualty control exercises while on deployment. U.S. Coast Guard photo.

Petty Officer 2nd Class Ryan Horsley is also a member of the engineering training team and conducted more than 130 basic casualty control exercises while on deployment. U.S. Coast Guard photo.

Horsley, together with Aldinger, worked for 12 hours troubleshooting a faulty piece of equipment. After changing out a crucial piece and some inventive problem solving, the two were finally able to get the evaporator to make enough water.

“MK2 played a vital role in assessing the problem, coming up with a solution and acting on that plan,” said Leonard. “MK2 was a major factor in Coast Guard Cutter Sherman’s ability to be capable of staying underway and fulfilling our mission down south.”

“What sets MK2 apart from the rest of the guys on the ship is his in-depth knowledge and ability to come up with solutions to problems on the spot when the pressure is on,” added Leonard.

Horsley is also a member of the engineering training team and conducted more than 130 basic casualty control exercises, ensuring the crew was well versed in responding to engineering casualties. He consistently took the time to enhance the crew’s engineering knowledge, and while on watch gave hands-on training to shipmates trying to obtain qualifications.

“Since I have gotten here, MK2 has been one of my close friends and has been a huge help professionally,” said Leonard. “He is always looking out for me when it comes to advice on advancement or professional development and has used his own time to teach me things on the job so that way I can fill his shoes when he is gone.”

Horsley is proof that it takes a capable, proficient and, sometimes, inventive team below deck to ensure the mission is complete above.

Do you know a Shipmate that has done something great for the service, the missions or the public? Please submit your nominations using the “Submit Ideas” link on the right.

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