Clay Evans, the Maritime Search and Rescue Western Region superintendent (left), and Capt. Brian Glander, the Coast Guard 11th District chief of incident management (right), present Ken White with the Coast Guard Public Service Commendation award at his home in Powell River, British Columbia, Feb. 9, 2019. White has dedicated more than 40 years of service to assisting mariners in distress. U.S. Coast Guard photo.

Honor, Respect, Devotion to Duty: Ken White, Angel of the Airwaves

Ken White, a Canadian citizen, has dedicated more than 40 years to helping mariners in distress. He monitors a wide range of emergency frequencies and quickly passes any information on through to the Rescue Coordination Center in Vancouver, British Columbia, and Alameda, California. For his endless dedication to helping the maritime community, the Coast Guard awarded White the Coast Guard Public Service Commendation.


Locals wave for help in the central highlands of Puerto Rico. U.S. Coast Guard photo.

The Long Blue Line: “Semper Paratus”—Coast Guard men and women in Hurricane Maria

U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliarist J. Edwin Nieves compiled oral histories from Coast Guard members who responded in the wake of Hurricane Maria in San Juan, Puerto Rico. Every one of these recorded oral histories proved compelling and revealed the commitment to service, devotion to duty and willingness to make sacrifices that characterizes the Coast Guard and the Coast Guard community. Each of the interviewees made sacrifices for others and endured personal privations.


Civil Engineering Unit Providence captures an aerial image during a new ATON inspection of the Duck Island fixed channel marker near New Haven, Conn. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Lt. Kieron McCarthy.

U.S. Coast Guard employs drone to inspect new ATON structures

U.S. Coast Guard Civil Engineering Unit Providence, Rhode Island, piloted a short range Unmanned Aerial System to inspect the construction of new Aids to Navigation structures. The UAS saved the CEU more than 30 hours of work and reduced the risk of having to climb the structures.

“The UAS has allowed us to be more self-sufficient when it comes to accessing hard to reach assets, so we can better serve our operational partners,” Lt. Kieron D. McCarthy.


Adm. Karl Schultz, Coast Guard commandant, salutes during the commissioning of Coast Guard Cutter Terrell Horne at Coast Guard Base Los Angeles-Long Beach, Calif., March 22, 2019. USCGC Terrell Horne is the third Fast Response Cutter to be homeported at Coast Guard Base Los Angeles-Long Beach and will operate throughout the 11th Coast Guard District, which includes all of California and international waters off Mexico and Central America. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Cory J. Mendenhall.

A Fitting Tribute: The commissioning of Coast Guard Cutter Terrell Horne

In 2012, Senior Chief Petty Officer Terrell Horne III made the ultimate sacrifice to save the life of his coxswain during a law enforcement mission that ended in a collision off the coast of Southern California. On March 21, 2019, the Coast Guard paid tribute to Horne by commissioning the Coast Guard’s newest Fast Response Cutter in his name. This new cutter honors his bravery, dedication and spirit of public service.


Danny Hahn mans the Central Tool Room at the Coast Guard Yard in Curtis Bay, Md. U.S. Coast Guard photo.

The Long Blue Line: Danny Hahn

Daniel “Danny” Hahn came from a family long associated with the Coast Guard Yard in Curtis Bay, Maryland. He served 50 years continuously at the Yard and set the record as the longest-serving wage grade civilian in Coast Guard history. He died in 2017 but will always be remembered as a hard-working Coast Guard civilian who served with distinction as a member of the long blue line.


Chief Petty Officer Milton Casey, a company commander at Training Center Cape May, poses for a photo in the entryway of Munro Hall, a barracks located at Training Center Cape May, N.J., March 26, 2019. Casey volunteers his time for the Coast Guard as well as his local community, church, and children in Haiti. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Richard Brahm.

Honor, Respect, Devotion to Duty: Chief Petty Officer Milton Casey

Coast Guard recruits who have recently spent time at Coast Guard Training Center Cape May, New Jersey, may know Chief Petty Officer Milton Casey as a stern company commander. Beyond his duties training incoming service members with his authoritative voice, Smokey Bear hat and unnaturally shiny boots, he is a dedicated family man and consummate community volunteer.


Photograph of the 165-foot cutter Icarus. (U.S. Coast Guard)

The Long Blue Line: Icarus – WWII combat cutter, OPC namesake

In 1942, the crew of Coast Guard Cutter Icarus, commanded by Lt. Maurice Jester, sank German U-352 off the coast of North Carolina. Shortly after sinking, the Coast Guard crew rescued 33 survivors of the 48-man crew – they were the first enemy combatants captured by U.S. forces in World War II. The cutter was decommissioned in 1948 but will soon live on as the namesake of the sixth in the first flight of Offshore Patrol Cutters in the “Heritage”-class.


Adm. Karl Schultz, Coast Guard commandant, delivers the 2019 State of the Coast Guard Address at Coast Guard Base Los Angeles-Long Beach in San Pedro, Calif., March 21, 2019. Speaking from the largest port in the nation, Schultz highlighted Coast Guard security and marine safety operations, which facilitates $4.6 trillion in annual economic activity. U.S. Coast Guard Photo by Seaman Ryan Estrada.

State of the Coast Guard 2019: With our people

Last month, I had the honor of giving my first State of the Coast Guard Address in Los Angeles where our tremendous men and women protect our Nation’s maritime interests every day.

Throughout my remarks, I tried to highlight our greatest strength, and the cornerstone of our Readiness, the dedicated men and women of the Coast Guard. As I look to the future, I am tremendously optimistic that our Service will remain strong, adaptive, and resilient to the challenges ahead.


James J. Coleman, Jr. at the 2014 Salute to the U.S. Coast Guard in New York City. Photo courtesy of the Coast Guard Foundation.

Honor, Respect, Devotion to Duty: James “Jimmy” Coleman

James “Jimmy” Coleman, Jr. never served in uniform but he was a well-respected member of the U.S. Coast Guard family. Coleman was a philanthropist who very much believed in the Coast Guard mission and its history. One could say the National Coast Guard Museum in New London, Connecticut, would not be what it is today without him. Coleman died at 77 on March 21, 2019 in his hometown of New Orleans.


Cutter Argo (WPC-100) on patrol. Originally designed for Prohibition law enforcement, this type of cutter was particularly seaworthy and maneuverable. With the U.S. entry into World War II, Argo was attached to the Atlantic Fleet as a convoy escort vessel. U.S. Coast Guard photo.

The Long Blue Line: A wartime rescue by Cutter Argo 75 years ago

It’s been 75 years since the wartime search and rescue efforts of the cutter Argo but it will forever remain a chapter in the saga of the long blue line. Cutters Argo and Thetis were part of a convoy off Cape May, New Jersey, when American tanker Camas Meadows steamed unescorted by an inexperienced crew, fatally rammed a Navy patrol gunboat. Argo’s officer of the day activated a search and rescue operation and rescued 23 survivors – 106 crew members of the Navy gunboat were lost.


Next Page »