Bernard Webber's motor lifeboat CG-36500 returns to Chatham, Mass., after rescuing 32 crewmen from a sinking tanker, Feb. 18, 1952. This rescue was dramatized in the feature film "The Finest Hours" in 2016. U.S. Coast Guard photo.

The Long Blue Line: Evolution of the Coast Guard’s Search and Rescue mission

Those familiar with Coast Guard history know that the service’s development has been shaped in response to the nation’s natural and man-made disasters. Nowhere is that clearer than the Coast Guard’s search and rescue mission. Major response efforts and evolving technology continue to influence the U.S. Coast Guard’s development as the world’s premier search and rescue organization.


Week in the life of the Coast Guard 2017 – Monday

Today begins our Week in the Life 2017 series. This series will provide you with an insider’s view of what a typical week looks like for Coast Guard members. We will take you from coast to coast, showing you the different aspects of life in the Coast Guard. From standing watch or training on the water to supporting our frontline operations, we will highlight the day-to-day lives of Coast Guard men and women throughout the country and overseas. Let’s start the journey!


Behind the scenes of Coast Guard search and rescue

Though their voices are always heard over the radio and they save countless lives, Coast Guard operations specialists are rarely seen by the maritime community they serve. Behind the scenes these Coast Guard men and women obtain vital information to rescue mariners and careful plan and coordinate search and rescue missions.


Coast Guard National Search and Rescue School celebrates 50th anniversary

On October 10, 1966, the Coast Guard and U.S. Air Force joined forces to open the National Search and Rescue School in Yorktown, Virginia, to provide training in oceanic, coastal and inland search planning procedures. The school, which has delivered training to 30,000 people, including more than 2,400 international students from 150 nations, recently celebrated 50 years of Service to Nation.


225 Years of Service to Nation

225 years of Service to Nation: Search and rescue

Those familiar with Coast Guard history know that the Service’s development has been shaped in part by the nation’s response to natural and man-made disasters. Nowhere is that lesson clearer than the history of the Service’s search and rescue, or SAR, mission.


Betty C

Ill-fated crew survives inferno at sea

In 2014, 205 people in the U.S. were saved because of EPIRBs. Eighty-three of them were rescued at sea in 28 separate incidents. Twenty-one of them were aboard Betty C.


Buffalo marine inspector

Lessons from 30-year old disaster still saving lives today

The SS Marine Electric sunk amidst a strong storm off the coast of Virginia on Feb. 12, 1983. Of the crew of 34, only three survived. In response to the sinking, the Coast Guard convened a marine board to investigate the causes surrounding the disaster. The resulting report was released 30 years ago this summer and would significantly alter the safety culture throughout the maritime community.


Multiple surface and aviation assets from the U.S. Coast Guard, Canadian Coast Guard and local agencies search the water in Lake Erie for four people who were reported overdue, April 17, 2014. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Philip Null.

Appeals court upholds fine of nearly $500,000 for false distress call

Last week the United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit upheld a restitution payment of nearly $500,000 as part of the sentence handed down in United States of America v. Danik Shiv Kumar for making a false distress call that caused a massive search on Lake Erie in March 2012.


Fireman Smith

Shipmate of the Week – FN Jacob Smith

Quick reflexes and fast thinking were put to the test late on a late Friday afternoon when the Station Bodega Bay, Calif., duty crew sprinted into action at the sound of the search and rescue alarm. Fireman Jacob Smith, who been stationed at Bodega Bay for the past three years, was a crewman on the 47-foot motor lifeboat that launched when they received word of a fishing vessel that was taking on water with two people aboard.


1 day, 3 missions, 4 lives saved

It was a week after Coast Guard Commandant Adm. Bob Papp had given his State of the Coast Guard address. Capt. Joseph P. Kelly, commanding officer of Air Station Elizabeth City, had set aside an afternoon for all-hands training to watch the speech and reflect on themes from the address. In the two hours surrounding the scheduled training time, however, the SAR alarm had sounded. Not once, but three times. In a period of just a few short hours crews would launch out of Air Station Elizabeth City one after the other. By day’s end four lives would be saved.


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