The satellite communications ground station sits on the roof of Smith Hall at the U.S. Coast Guard Academy in New London, Conn. The main feature inside the radome is a 3-meter diameter parabolic dish antenna and communications components that ensure proper signals are transmitted to and received from the satellite. U.S. Coast Guard illustration by Petty Officer 2nd Class Lauren Laughlin.

Developing the way for a Coast Guard space program

There is a new landmark at the Coast Guard Academy and it is helping to launch the Coast Guard into an era of space operations.

The satellite communications ground station on the roof of Smith Hall was built by the Coast Guard Research and Development Center to support the Department of Homeland Security Science and Technology Polar Scout project, which successfully launched two CubeSats in December 2018, and will soon support a broad range of educational opportunities for cadets.


Crew members from Coast Guard Station Golden Gate brace themselves in their 47-foot motor life boat during heavy surf training off the coast of San Francisco. Surf Station Operations require a high level of head protection due to factors like the possibility of moderate impact force, extreme wave/surf heights and minimal warning time. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Barry Lane.

Research, Development, Testing and Evaluation: Boat crew helmets

Helmets are worn by boat crew members to provide head protection during hazardous conditions in various environments. The Coast Guard Research and Development Center has been evaluating personal protective helmets. The center’s extensive research will benefit 16,000 Coast Guard boat crew members throughout the active duty, reserve and auxiliary ranks.


The Coast Guard's Science and Technology Innovation Center is officially opened during a ribbon cutting ceremony. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer Cory Mendenhall.

Coast Guard’s new Science and Technology Innovation Center to enhance mission effectiveness through innovation

Ideas and innovation occur at all levels of an organization. Some of these ideas require years of research to develop into a fully executable solution, while other solutions can be more rapidly deployed. These innovations often improve mission effectiveness and offer solutions to potential issues that may arise. Recently, the Coast Guard, alongside scientists at the Department of Homeland Security’s Science and Technology Directorate (S&T), recognized that the Coast Guard fell short in this area, and worked to create a lasting solution that would allow for quick implementation of innovative ideas.


Remote Rescue

Remote rescues

To say that the North Shore of Alaska is a remote place is an understatement. The North Shore borders the Chukchi Sea and the Beaufort Sea, two marginal seas of the Arctic Ocean. Even in the middle of July, the waters in the area are still icy with large ice flows in many areas. It is not hard to see that conducting search and rescue, one of the Coast Guard’s core missions in the area, presents unusual challenges.


Coast Guard Engineering: A multidisciplinary team dedicated to guarding our homeland through technical expertise

Behind every Coast Guard mission is a dedicated team of engineers charged with keeping our aircraft, cutters, boats, and shore infrastructure both operational and technologically at the cutting edge. Coast Guard engineering as a whole encompasses several engineering disciplines…


Coast Guard RDC, Cutter Healy underway for Arctic Shield 2014

Coast Guard RDC, Cutter Healy underway for Arctic Shield 2014

A team of scientists from the Coast Guard Research and Development Center, New London, Connecticut, is currently underway aboard Coast Guard Cutter Healy for a series of technology evaluations in the Arctic. The team departed Seward, Alaska, August 8 and is currently conducting operations off the North Slope.


Healy in the Arctic

Scientific adventures in the Arctic

Crewmembers aboard Coast Guard Cutter Healy recently supported scientific research in the Arctic’s dynamic waters. As the crew supported vital scientific research, they were joined by a multitude of scientists and support staff from the National Intelligence University, U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, U.S. Air Force, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and University of Alaska.


The science of safety

Inside the thick red hull of Coast Guard Cutter Healy, a multitude of crewmembers, scientists and support staff hustle to and fro, performing their various jobs in preparation for operations during Arctic Shield 2013. The 420-foot icebreaker reached its destination amidst the ice floes of the cold Arctic waters, and everyone is eager to begin deploying the five unique technologies aboard the ship that could have the ability to enhance oil detection and recovery capabilities in the Arctic.