The Long Blue Line: The Cutter Mercury and War of 1812 Operations in North Carolina

Before the War of 1812, revenue cutters enforced trade laws and interdicted smuggling. During the war, the cutters cemented many of the combat and homeland security missions performed today by the U.S. Coast Guard, including intelligence gathering.


Honor, Respect, Devotion to Duty: Rep. Howard Coble

Coble retired from his political service in January 2015, after serving in Congress for more than 30 years. With his combined service time, he spent more than 55 years of his life serving with and supporting the U.S. Coast Guard. He was the last Coast Guard veteran serving in Congress.


Week in the life of the Coast Guard 2014: Monday

For the past 224 years the Coast Guard has safeguarded our nation’s maritime interests, providing a 24/7 presence along America’s rivers, ports, coastline and on the high seas. But while the Coast Guard’s presence and impact is regional, national and international, our operations are often out of sight.


Rep. Price

The spirit of Bertholf: Rep. David Price

More than 3,000 Coast Guard members call North Carolina home. North Carolina is also home to Rep. David Price, the 2013 recipient of the Commodore Ellsworth P. Bertholf Award. The annual award is a way to recognize members of Congress who exemplify the spirit of the award’s namesake – the service’s first commandant.


Caucus breakfast

He is family

Rep. Howard Coble will soon retire after this term in Congress. He is the last Coast Guard veteran currently serving in Congress. Reminiscing on both his service in the Coast Guard and as a member of Congress, the one thing he wishes Americans would do is fully support the service.


BM1 Keating

Following historic footsteps to modern tradition

Atop the dunes, Petty Officer 1st Class Louis Keating Jr. realized what was about to happen and was handed a historic surf check – a brass tag surfman would carry during their beach patrols. He was then told to head north to complete a beach patrol walking in the footsteps of the heroes who came before him from the historic Pea Island Lifesaving Station.


white out

From air station to ice station

It was a cold, windy and snowy morning on the Outer Banks of North Carolina. A fierce winter storm had blown through the night before and entire towns were shut down because of the conditions. Emergencies don’t wait for the weather to clear, however, and a medical patient at The Outer Banks Hospital needed care beyond what could be provided. With roads swathed in snow, the only way to get out was by air; Air Station Elizabeth City, that is.


Coast Guard Heroes: Benjamin B. Dailey

Benjamin B. Dailey was the keeper of the Cape Hatteras Lifeboat Station on Dec. 22, 1885, when he and his crew, assisted by Keeper Patrick H. Etheridge of the Creed’s Hill station, rescued nine men from the foundering ship Ephraim Williams, five miles off the Outer Banks. Those aboard Ephraim Williams were distraught and hungry, having been battered by the weather for more than 90 hours. In one of the most daring rescues by the Life-Saving Service, Dailey’s seven-man crew pulled for two hours through heavy seas to reach the vessel. Only by relying on his expert boat-handling skills was Dailey able to bring all the survivors and his own crew back safely.


Response boat

Newest response boat in action

After months of training, the crew of Coast Guard Station Wrightsville Beach, N.C., finished qualifying on their 45-foot Response Boat – Medium, the 126th of 170 response boats being delivered to the service. The 45-foot Response Boat – Medium replaces the 41-foot Utility Boat, which has been the Coast Guard’s workhorse of the fleet for more than 25 years.


rescue

Foul weather feats

Fast-moving storms blew through parts of the Eastern Seaboard last week, whipping maritime communities with heavy rain and high winds. True to form for Coast Guard men and women, the foul weather was no match for the perseverance of Coast Guard crews.


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