Below Zero: Partnership between the Coast Guard and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

For more than 200 years, the U.S. Coast Guard and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration have partnered together in maritime resiliency, environmental sustainability and scientific research. The two services have a strong working relationship supporting and representing the U.S. in cold weather operations and Arctic initiatives.


Below Zero Kick Off – Coast Guard’s Cold Weather Operations

January and February are the most common coldest months throughout the nation. It’s a time when many Coast Guard units participate in domestic icebreaking and ice rescues. During this month-long campaign, we want to stress cold weather safety for those who may be near water or ice with the help of our National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and International Ice Patrol partners as well as various Coast Guard units.


Mapping the extended continental shelf in the Arctic

The crew of the service’s most technologically advanced polar icebreaker, Coast Guard Cutter Healy, has been assisting Dr. Larry Mayer and his team from University of New Hampshire’s (UNH) National Center for Coastal and Ocean Mapping with mapping the areas of the Arctic where the U.S. has potential rights to extend its continental shelf. The Healy crew acts as the backbone for groundbreaking science, providing presence and access throughout the Arctic to execute Coast Guard missions, project national sovereignty, and fulfill treaty obligations.


Coast Guard Cutter Healy: Still breaking the way

Coast Guard Cutter Healy’s mission has been devoted to service in Alaskan and Arctic waters since it first sailed. This summer, Healy’s crew and scientists from both the University of Alaska-Anchorage and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration made several ground-breaking discoveries while plying the frigid waters of the Arctic Chukchi Sea. Read more to find out how they helped improve knowledge and understanding of the rapidly changing region.


Must have alerts and apps for Hurricane Matthew

Hurricane Matthew is expected to make landfall in Florida as early as the night of Thursday, Oct. 6, 2016. Florida, Georgia, and South Carolina are expected to be impacted the most. If you are in the path of the storm, listen to local officials! Follow local evacuation instructions. Do not go to the beaches or out on the water! Use these alert services and apps to get all of the pertinent information and to be prepared for Hurricane Matthew.


Change in season: Fall weather hazards

Fall is officially here, and while it is a beautiful and usually mild time of year, it can also bring unusual weather. Since fall is a transitional season, weather hazards seen during both warm and cold months, including hurricanes, wildfires, intense winds, flooding, droughts, early season snow and more, can occur. Common fall hazards include floods, fog, hurricanes, solar flares, wildfires, wind and winter storms – just to name a few. Read more about being safe this fall!


10 things to help get you Semper Paratus

Semper Paratus takes on a new meaning during Personal Readiness Month. It means more than being ready for a search and rescue case. Personal Readiness Month is the Coast Guard’s way to remind everyone – active, reserve, auxiliary, family and friends – to really think about being ready.

To do this, we’ve compiled a list of 10 things you can do to ensure you’re ‘Always Ready.’


National Preparedness Month: Hurricanes happen – prepare early and often

September is National Preparedness Month. Today we’ll tell you how to make sure you are prepared for one of the largest weather phenomena – hurricanes. It appears that the peak of hurricane season may be upon us. While hurricanes usually give us a heads-up that they are coming, that doesn’t mean we can let up our guards. A hurricane’s path can change several times and even at the last minute. It is important to plan early and often for these events. Even for those who do not live in coastal states, hurricanes can bring high amounts of rain and strong winds inland as well. So no matter where you live, it is important to increase your awareness and protect yourself, your family, home and property from harmful hurricanes or tropical storms.


Kenny Cook feature photo

Life aboard a Coast Guard icebreaker

Petty Officer Kenny Cook, a boatswain’s mate aboard the Coast Guard Cutter Healy, gives a first-hand account of life aboard the Coast Guard’s largest icebreaker.


Are you ready for disaster to hit?

National Preparedness Month: Hurricanes

“Big” is an understatement when used as a descriptor of a hurricane. “Massive” or “dangerous” is perhaps a better way to describe a hurricane. Here are some basic tips to help you prepare for a major disaster like hurricanes.


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