225 Years of Service to Nation

225 years of Service to Nation: Living marine resources

As the Nation’s environmental and Homeland Security priorities continue to evolve, the Coast Guard’s living marine resources mission will continue to evolve in order to meet shifting demands. Throughout all the changes, however, one thing will remain certain: the Coast Guard will remain ‘Semper Paratus’ to ensure safety, security and stewardship- protecting life, not only at sea, but within the sea as well.

World Oceans Day 2015

World Oceans Day: Protecting our oceans

From protecting sea turtles and Hawaiian sea monks to safeguarding our Nation’s maritime resources, the Coast Guard stands ready to ensure our the protection of each and every federal waterway and the natural resources therein.

A unique rescue operation saves two sea turtles

Unique rescue operation saves two sea turtles

Protecting living marine resources is one of the 11 statutory missions of the U.S. Coast Guard. While thinking about Coast Guard rescues, many think about the Coast Guard assiting those in distress, but many forget about the Coast Guard’s committment to rescuing those that also live beneath the water’s surface.

Station Cortez Turtle Rescue

Loggerhead rescue: Safeguarding marine animals

Often, when thinking about Coast Guard rescues, people imagine a rescue swimmer assisting someone in distress or a small boat crew pulling a person from the water. Often forgotten, however, is the Coast Guard’s efforts to protect creatures that live below the water’s surface. Safeguarding marine mammals falls under the Coast Guard’s living marine resources mission, one of the service’s 11 statutory missions. Recently, U.S. Coast Guard Station Cortez, Fla., upheld this mission by rescuing an injured sea turtle off the coast of Florida.

R1KU, an endangered Hawaiian monk seal. U.S. Coast Guard photo.

The transport of R1KU

Safeguarding marine mammals falls under the Coast Guard’s living marine resources mission, one of the service’s 11 statutory missions. The nation’s waterways and their ecosystems are vital to the country’s economy and health. This includes ensuring the country’s marine protected species are provided the protection necessary to help their populations recover to healthy, sustainable levels.


Saving our oceans one turtle at a time

It was an emergency wildlife mission. A bunch of sick, cold Northeast turtles were stuck in Cape Cod trying to swim south and needed a quick lift to Florida. The Coast Guard heeded the call with a C-130J Hercules based out of Elizabeth City, N.C. The 70-pound Loggerhead and the smaller five to 10-pound Kemp’s Ridley turtles are in various stages of recovery from pneumonia and hypothermia. A record stranding of more than 200 sea turtles off the Northeast coast in early winter exceeded the New England Aquarium’s capacity to house the nearly comatose reptiles. Sensing urgency, the NOAA Fisheries Northeast Stranding Network facilitated a request for the emergency flight.

Whale breaching

Safeguarding the humpback whale

  Written by 14th Coast Guard District public affairs. The Coast Guard is a key protector of our nation’s critical marine habitats and the endangered species dependent on them. These ocean resources are particularly important to those in the 14th […]


Cutter Edisto helps wayward sea lion

As part of the service’s living marine resources mission, the Coast Guard teams up with a variety of organizations to aid in protecting and responding to distressed animals, including sea lions. Such was the case for Southern California crews with Franklin, a wayward sea lion.


On patrol with Waesche: Boardings & shark fins

Coast Guard Cutter Waesche – the second of eight planned national security cutters – had a successful inaugural patrol, and after an in-port period is back at it again. Waesche’s crew is currently on an Asia-Pacific patrol and is once […]


Your Coast Guard in 2011 – Mid-Atlantic

In February, a Coast Guard airplane circled high off the coast of New Jersey. Scallopers were suspected of illegally fishing in a closed area, damaging the recovery of the Hudson Canyon’s scallop population. However, locating and gathering evidence against them in a large, exposed area presented challenges. Protecting living marine resources has been a Coast Guard mission since 1894, although the execution has evolved. Nowhere is this truer than in the 5th Coast Guard District.

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