Innovation Program seeks hurricane lessons learned from Coast Guard responders

The Hurricane Lessons Learned challenge on the Coast Guard’s crowdsourcing platform, CG_Ideas@Work, was started as a way to preserve and institutionalize the wealth of lessons learned during hurricane response efforts. All Coast Guard personnel who participated in any of the response efforts are encouraged to share their observations, issues and ideas.


Hurricanes, again? Yes, it’s that time of year.

Hurricane preparation isn’t a new subject; in fact the Coast Guard has been harping about it for centuries. It’s not something to scoff at or dismiss; they aren’t spectacles to challenge. Sometimes hurricanes pass through with little to no damage, and then there are those that create extremely hazardous conditions, chaos, destruction and or death. Help us help you by being prepared before the unexpected happens.


The Long Blue Line: Keeper Haines and the hurricane that obliterated Galveston Lifesaving Station

In 1900 a hurricane struck Galveston, Texas, obliterating a lifesaving station and killing thousands. The storm unleashed winds of approximately 150 mph and the storm surge flooded the city. The station’s keeper and his crew had little forewarning of the storm, but they could sense that something was brewing in the Gulf of Mexico.


Helping Haiti: Coast Guard teams assist in Haiti following Hurricane Matthew

While Hurricane Matthew, a category 4 storm, was barreling toward Haiti, a small team of Coast Guard officers was hunkered down in a makeshift command center at a house in Port-au-Prince. The planning and coordination for what became the most destructive storm to hit Haiti in more than 50 years, took place in that makeshift command center and set the tone for the U.S. military response.


Must have alerts and apps for Hurricane Matthew

Hurricane Matthew is expected to make landfall in Florida as early as the night of Thursday, Oct. 6, 2016. Florida, Georgia, and South Carolina are expected to be impacted the most. If you are in the path of the storm, listen to local officials! Follow local evacuation instructions. Do not go to the beaches or out on the water! Use these alert services and apps to get all of the pertinent information and to be prepared for Hurricane Matthew.


Hurricanes are no joke – prepare yourself, family before it’s too late

Hurricane season officially begins in little more than a week from now, and runs June 1 through November 30. If history has taught us anything about hurricanes, it’s to never underestimate a storm’s power of destruction – take for instance Katrina (2005), Irene (2011) and Sandy (2012), which incurred a combined total of $168 billion in damages. According to the Wall Street Journal, of the top 10 costliest natural disasters in the U.S., eight of them have been hurricanes.


Are you ready for disaster to hit?

National Preparedness Month: Hurricanes

“Big” is an understatement when used as a descriptor of a hurricane. “Massive” or “dangerous” is perhaps a better way to describe a hurricane. Here are some basic tips to help you prepare for a major disaster like hurricanes.


Honoring History: Revenue Cutter Pickering

The story of the U.S. Revenue Cutter Pickering is one of the many lost chapters in Coast Guard history. This is not a story about a cutter, but about her brave commander and crew.


Hurricane Arthur

Hurricane Arthur: Stay safe on the coast

With the Fourth of July holiday and warm weather upon us, the beach is a popular destination for both tourists and residents of coastal communities. However, in the midst of hurricane season, it could also become one of the most dangerous destinations. With the first named hurricane of the season, Arthur, making it’s way up the Atlantic Coast, make sure you stay up to date on the latest local weather updates as the holiday weekend progresses.


hurricane

To discuss or not discuss: Helping children prepare for hazards

There are varying opinions to the age-old question, “How much information do you give your children about a possible or pending emergency situation.” Think about how you approach “heavy” topics with your children. Do you follow the philosophy that you should withhold information, so you don’t frighten a child until they are forced to face it, or do you share information with them, so they have some advance knowledge?


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