Wreath ceremony

Wreaths Over the Water

When three men from the Civil Air Patrol walked into Coast Guard Station Lake Worth Inlet in Riviera Beach, Fla., in December 2007 and requested assistance in laying wreaths on veteran’s graves in support of the national Wreaths Across America event, it occurred to Auxiliarist Ed Greenfield there were some veterans who had no headstone to mark their graves.


naval base

A look back at 10 years in the Middle East

Tearful goodbyes, a mission on the other side of the world, sweltering heat and long days in the Persian Gulf followed by joyous homecomings. For the past 10 years Port Security Units have cycled through Kuwait Naval Base and provided security to for the vital personnel and supplies neeeded for Operations Iraqi Freedom, Enduring Freedom and New Dawn. After completing their mission overseas recently, here’s a look back at their journey through photos…


Aboard Barque Eagle

Defending the rights we have today

The Coast Guard’s roots in America’s maritime history is a daily reminder to Coast Guard men and women of their service’s unique contributions to the nation. Arguably, nowhere is that more true than aboard Coast Guard Barque Eagle. Crewmembers aboard the current Eagle had a unique opportunity to reflect on the service’s storied past when they visited the site of an intense battle fought by their maritime forefathers nearly 200 years before.


marching

The best Coast Guard cadence?

Coast Guard recruits at Training Center Cape May spend a lot of time marching to and from various training evolutions and classes. In the later weeks of their training, company commanders begin to call cadences with them. This is a […]


On patrol

Mounted beach patrol: When the service saddled up

Beach patrols were normally done on foot, going back as early as 1871, when the Life-Saving Service, a predecessor of the modern Coast Guard, used foot patrols to watch the coastlines for ships in distress. The service used horses to haul boats from storage sheds to the launching point to rescue crews from ships run aground. After the attack on Pearl Harbor, the wartime beach patrol was put into action and the seagoing service saddled up in 1942, when horses were authorized for use to patrol U.S. beaches. Using the horses allowed the patrols to cover far more territory faster and more easily than men on foot.


Cutter Etheridge

In behalf of humanity

Another vessel has joined the ranks and earned the title “Coast Guard cutter.” However this isn’t just any cutter, it’s a fast response cutter. At 154-feet long, the ship has an impressive array of capabilities, including sustained speeds of more than 28 knots and an armament of a stabilized 25mm machine-gun mount and four, crew-served .50-caliber machine guns. But more impressive than its technology, more impressive than its features, is the cutter’s namesake – Richard Etheridge.


Cmdr. Graham

Helicopter pilot #2 – CDR Stewart Graham

Graham is credited with many helicopter firsts, including the first wartime anti-submarine patrol requiring him to perform the first take-off and landing from a vessel on the high seas. In 1947 he successfully completed the Coast Guard’s first-ever night helicopter medical evacuation. As one of the first to use this technique, Graham was instrumental in exhibiting the capabilities and possibilities of rotary-wing technology to decision makers ensuring support for helicopter programs for decades to come.


A replica revenue cutters' ensign

War of 1812: How the digital age helped unearth history

While the Coast Guard was aware prisoners of war had been taken captive during the War of 1812, there was uncertainty about the number of prisoners and details of their imprisonment. Until recently. Since the British burned the Treasury Building in 1814 during its attack on Washington, D.C., historical records from the Coast Guard’s predecessor Revenue Cutter Service had been lost. Thanks to the curiosity and meticulous research by a Coast Guard Auxiliary member, an Internet search yielded records kept by the British at their National Archives in Kew.


USS Mohawk

USS Mohawk reaches final resting place

For years, artificial reefs have been used to encourage algae and invertebrates, such as barnacles, to provide habitat for fish and other marine life. Yesterday, the USS Mohawk entered a second life as an artificial reef when it was sunk nearly 30 miles off the coast of Fort Meyers, Fla. Since a current Coast Guard cutter homeported in Key West, Fla. bears the same name, it seemed somehow fitting that Mohawk would find a new home in sub-tropical waters.


D-Day

D-Day through the eyes of a Coast Guardsman

It was June 6, 1944, when Allied forces began the largest amphibious invasion of all time – D-Day. Today, on the anniversary of D-Day, Compass would like to share the story of Motor Machinist’s Mate 1st Class Clifford W. Lewis, […]


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