Members of Electronic Support Detachment Guam repair a generator at the Mt. Alutom radio site on Guam following Typhoon Mangkhut, Sept. 15, 2018. The generator is a back up power system for the Rescue 21 radio site. U.S. Coast Guard photo.

Communication and connectivity following Mangkhut: A Rescue 21 story

Category 5 Typhoon Mangkhut recently impacted the islands of Guam and Rota, a commonwealth of the U.S. It plunged 80 percent of Guam into darkness and all of Rota, flooded areas and destroyed aids to navigation and damaged the Rescue 21 VHF and microwave radio sites in Guam and Rota. The U.S. Coast Guard sent supplies and crews to Rota to provide aid to the community and repair and restore power to the radio sites that are used to listen for distress calls throughout the Mariana Islands. Read here to learn more about the Rescue 21 system and how this 21st century technology assists these small Pacific islands.


Coast Guard reservists pause for a photo at Station Apra Harbor in Guam. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Amanda Levasseur.

Guam’s Guardians: How reservists make the difference

Guam may be where America’s day begins, but at Station Apra Harbor in Santa Rita, Guam, reservists are known to be busy day and night. The Coast Guard Reserve has a long history of serving the people of the Pacific and continues to play a critical role in the local community.


Listening to the deep

We know more about the surface of the Moon and Mars than we do about the ocean’s seafloor. With water encompassing 63.78 million square miles, the oceans cover 70 percent of the Earth’s surface, with the world’s largest body of water, the Pacific Ocean, covering roughly one third. The Pacific also boasts the deepest trenches, specifically Challenger Deep in the Mariana Trench near the Federated States of Micronesia. Given Challenger Deep’s inhospitable environment, no one has attempted to extensively record ambient sound at its full depth. That is, until now.


Operation Rai Balang

Coast Guard cutters Assateague and Sequoia recently returned to Apra Harbor, Guam, after each cutter completed patrols as part of Operation Rai Balang, a regional fisheries operation between the United States, Federated States of Micronesia, Republic of Palau and Republic of Marshall Islands. The cutters combined transited more than 7,500 nautical miles over 40 days at sea through the Commonwealth of Northern Marianas Island’s exclusive economic zone and surrounding high seas.


Cutter Washington and Station Apra Harbor

Leaning forward on forward deployments

The 14th Coast Guard District is charged with protecting and patrolling more than 90,000 miles of coastline. In fact, of the total 3.4 million square nautical miles of U.S. Exclusive Economic Zone, 43 percent resides within this region. With such a large expanse of ocean to operate in, teamwork is critical in performing the many missions of the U.S. Coast Guard. It was this sense of teamwork and partnership that the two units – cutter and station – joined together.


Fly over

Search and rescue: Oceania

Standing the Hawaiian Islands watch requires a force of on call specialists, always ready for the surge capacity nature of the job. Modern search and rescue methodology has sprinted forward in recent decades, keeping pace with evolving technology. Sometimes a Coast Guardsmen’s best lifesaving tool is not only more than two hundred year of lifesaving tradition, but also products of the digital era.


Sconiers

Shipmate of the Week – SN Thomas Sconiers

When Seaman Thomas Sconiers, lead seaman aboard Coast Guard Cutter Washington, says he has been in the Coast Guard “all me bloomin’ life” he means it. His father, Thomas Sconiers Sr., is a chief warrant officer having risen through the ranks as an electronics technician. As a young boy, Sconiers lived in nearly every major Coast Guard town in the country, from Kodiak, Alaska, to Mobile, Ala.


Adm. Papp with Coast Guard Cutter Washington crewmembers

Adm. Papp thanks Navy helicopter squadron and visits Coast Guardsmen in Guam

Commandant of the Coast Guard Adm. Bob Papp addressed Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron 25 – the Island Knights – in Guam last week, thanking them for their outstanding support of Coast Guard search and rescue operations. The Coast Guard has no helicopters stationed in Guam and has relied upon HSC-25 since its formation in 1984 for airlift assistance with both maritime and over-land search and rescue.


Stranded survivors

15 rescued after stranded on a Pacific island

The Pacific Islands is a beautiful place to be out on the water. But when things go wrong, the vast ocean presents challenges to search and rescue resources. With limited means of communication across these small islands, mariners must have […]


itCG-MSST Seattle returns home, US and Canada search for boater, investigation results released, migrants repatriated, divers in Saipan rescued

Members of Maritime Safety and Security Team (MSST) Seattle (91101), returned home Friday after a six month deployment conducting port security duties in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. MSSTs were created under the Maritime Transportation Security Act (MTSA) 2002 and are a […]


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