Memorabilia showcased at a memorial service for Senior Chief Petty Officer Terrrell Horne III. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Timothy Tamargo.

Coast Guard to name cutter for BMCS Terrell Horne III

Coast Guard Commandant Adm. Paul Zukunft announced today the Coast Guard will name a cutter in honor of Senior Chief Petty Officer Terrell Horne III who died on Dec. 2, 2012, while carrying out law enforcement operations near Santa Cruz, California. The Commandant personally informed the Horne family earlier today a fast response cutter will bear Terrell’s name in honor of his sacrifice and faithful service in defense of his nation.


Cutters

Coast Guard fast response cutters make history

Coast Guard cutters Charles Sexton and Paul Clark are two of the service’s new fast response cutters. Capable of speeds in excess of 28 knots and armed with one stabilized remotely operated 25-mm chain gun and four crew-served .50-caliber machine guns, their crews deliver superior law enforcement capabilities. It was this capability that led to a historic drug interdiction.


Ceremony

‘I knew no other life’

The newest cutter – to be commissioned this weekend – is named in honor of the keeper of Black Rock Harbor Light, Kathleen “Kate” Moore. It was 1817 when Moore first stood the watch. She was 12. While she wasn’t a full keeper of the light at the time, her father tended the light after a shipboard injury prevented him from going to sea. As Moore grew older, and her father’s health worsened, she took on keeper duties, although she was not officially appointed as head keeper until 1871.


U.S. Coast Guard graphic by Petty Officer 2nd Class Kelly Parker.

Coast Guard to name cutter for DC3 Nathan Bruckenthal

At an Arlington National Cemetery memorial service marking the 10th anniversary of the death of Petty Officer 3rd Class Nathan Bruckenthal, who died during combat operations off the coast of Iraq, Commandant of the Coast Guard Adm. Bob Papp announced the U.S. Coast Guard will name a cutter in Bruckenthal’s honor.


Moore

Illuminating the path ahead

Women’s History Month is one of many celebrations that remind Americans of their identities and the impact of those who have gone before us. While Women’s History Month has come to an end, the Coast Guard continues to honor women and the contributions they have made to shape the service’s history. Kathleen Moore is one of these women.


Adak aerial

Coast Guard Heroes: Jacob Lauri Arthur Poroo

Jacob Lauri Arthur Poroo was a Hospital Corpsman 1st Class who was stationed at Adak Island, Alaska. On the morning of June 2, 1968, he entered a burning cabin to attempt a rescue. When fire erupted about 3: 30 a.m., it engulfed the doorway of the old recreation building. Poroo, together with seven other men, successfully escaped. Hearing shouting and believing it to be a cry for help from a trapped companion, Poroo re-entered the flaming cabin to render assistance with complete disregard for his own safety.


Master Chief

Coast Guard Heroes: Donald H. Horsley

Master Chief Petty Officer Donald H. Horsley served the Coast Guard though 44 years of continuous service from age 17 to 62, enlisting Aug. 4, 1942. He served on active duty for 44 years, four months and 27 days. His career spanned three wars and saw service aboard 34 vessels.


beach cart

Coast Guard Heroes: Benjamin B. Dailey

Benjamin B. Dailey was the keeper of the Cape Hatteras Lifeboat Station on Dec. 22, 1885, when he and his crew, assisted by Keeper Patrick H. Etheridge of the Creed’s Hill station, rescued nine men from the foundering ship Ephraim Williams, five miles off the Outer Banks. Those aboard Ephraim Williams were distraught and hungry, having been battered by the weather for more than 90 hours. In one of the most daring rescues by the Life-Saving Service, Dailey’s seven-man crew pulled for two hours through heavy seas to reach the vessel. Only by relying on his expert boat-handling skills was Dailey able to bring all the survivors and his own crew back safely.


buoy drill

Coast Guard Heroes: Bailey T. Barco

On Dec. 21, 1900, the schooner Jennie Hall had run aground in a severe winter storm off the coast of Virginia Beach, Va. Upon notification of the grounding, the Dam Neck Station Life-Saving Station keeper, Bailey T. Barco proceeded to the scene and took command. Realizing the use of the surfboat was dangerous, if not impossible, Barco directed the assembling of the beach apparatus and soon a breeches buoy had delivered all but one of the survivors to safety.


Motor lifeboat

Coast Guard Heroes: John F. McCormick

Boatswain John F. McCormick was Officer-in-Charge of the wooden 52-foot motor lifeboat Triumph out of Station Point Adams at the mouth of the Columbia River. On March 26, 1938, Triumph proceeded out to the bar and stood by while several crab boats crossed in. The tug Tyee with a barge load of logs in tow was attempting to cross out. Tyee passed too closely to the lifebuoy and the barge drifted into the outer break on Clatsop Spit. While attempting to assist Tyee, Triumph was carried broadside on the face of a wave with the masts completely submerged.


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