Moore

Illuminating the path ahead

Women’s History Month is one of many celebrations that remind Americans of their identities and the impact of those who have gone before us. While Women’s History Month has come to an end, the Coast Guard continues to honor women and the contributions they have made to shape the service’s history. Kathleen Moore is one of these women.


Adak aerial

Coast Guard Heroes: Jacob Lauri Arthur Poroo

Jacob Lauri Arthur Poroo was a Hospital Corpsman 1st Class who was stationed at Adak Island, Alaska. On the morning of June 2, 1968, he entered a burning cabin to attempt a rescue. When fire erupted about 3: 30 a.m., it engulfed the doorway of the old recreation building. Poroo, together with seven other men, successfully escaped. Hearing shouting and believing it to be a cry for help from a trapped companion, Poroo re-entered the flaming cabin to render assistance with complete disregard for his own safety.


Master Chief

Coast Guard Heroes: Donald H. Horsley

Master Chief Petty Officer Donald H. Horsley served the Coast Guard though 44 years of continuous service from age 17 to 62, enlisting Aug. 4, 1942. He served on active duty for 44 years, four months and 27 days. His career spanned three wars and saw service aboard 34 vessels.


beach cart

Coast Guard Heroes: Benjamin B. Dailey

Benjamin B. Dailey was the keeper of the Cape Hatteras Lifeboat Station on Dec. 22, 1885, when he and his crew, assisted by Keeper Patrick H. Etheridge of the Creed’s Hill station, rescued nine men from the foundering ship Ephraim Williams, five miles off the Outer Banks. Those aboard Ephraim Williams were distraught and hungry, having been battered by the weather for more than 90 hours. In one of the most daring rescues by the Life-Saving Service, Dailey’s seven-man crew pulled for two hours through heavy seas to reach the vessel. Only by relying on his expert boat-handling skills was Dailey able to bring all the survivors and his own crew back safely.


buoy drill

Coast Guard Heroes: Bailey T. Barco

On Dec. 21, 1900, the schooner Jennie Hall had run aground in a severe winter storm off the coast of Virginia Beach, Va. Upon notification of the grounding, the Dam Neck Station Life-Saving Station keeper, Bailey T. Barco proceeded to the scene and took command. Realizing the use of the surfboat was dangerous, if not impossible, Barco directed the assembling of the beach apparatus and soon a breeches buoy had delivered all but one of the survivors to safety.


Motor lifeboat

Coast Guard Heroes: John F. McCormick

Boatswain John F. McCormick was Officer-in-Charge of the wooden 52-foot motor lifeboat Triumph out of Station Point Adams at the mouth of the Columbia River. On March 26, 1938, Triumph proceeded out to the bar and stood by while several crab boats crossed in. The tug Tyee with a barge load of logs in tow was attempting to cross out. Tyee passed too closely to the lifebuoy and the barge drifted into the outer break on Clatsop Spit. While attempting to assist Tyee, Triumph was carried broadside on the face of a wave with the masts completely submerged.


1894

Coast Guard Heroes: Lawrence O. Lawson

Lawrence O. Lawson was keeper of the Evanston, Il., Lifeboat Station. Nov. 28, 1889, he and his crew, made up entirely of students from nearby Northwestern University, came to the aid of the foundering steam vessel Calumet. In the course of affecting the rescue, Lawson and his crew traversed 15 miles through a gale by train, by horseback and by foot. After two failed attempts to conduct the rescue by firing a line to the vessel, Lawson decided to launch the surfboat. Under near-impossible icy conditions, the crew was finally able to launch.


CALLAWAY

Coast Guard Heroes: Rollin A. Fritch

The transport ship USS Callaway was off the Coast of Luzon, in the Philippine Islands on Jan. 8, 1945, when desperate Japanese kamikaze attacks were launched in a determined effort to break up the landings. Eventually a suicide plane broke through heavy antiaircraft fire to crash on the starboard wing of Callaway ‘s bridge. Cool and skillful work against resulting fires kept material damage to a minimum and one of the men who sprung into action that day was Seaman First Class Rollin A. Fritch.


buffalo station

Coast Guard Heroes: Winslow W. Griesser

On Nov. 21, 1900, two large scows broke from their moorings some 3 miles southwest of the Buffalo Life-Saving Station in New York; the scows, a type of flat-bottomed boat, drifted toward the breakers. The station’s surfmen saw this from the lookout tower and promptly launched the lifeboat, with Winslow W. Griesser, keeper of the station, aboard.


Stewards-Mate 1st Class Charles David Jr.’s wife, Kathleen, and son, Neil, receive a Navy and Marine Corps Medal awarded posthumously at a ceremony in 1944. U.S. Coast Guard photo.

A ‘tower of strength’

Around 1 a.m. on Feb. 3, 1943, German submarine U-223 torpedoed the U.S. Army Transport Dorchester, which carried more than 900 troops, civilian contractors and crew, off the coast of Greenland. Coast Guard Cutter Comanche served as one of the […]


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