A 110-year-old Solomon Scout veteran prepares to lay a wreath during the Solomon Scouts and Coastwatchers Memorial during 75th Anniversary of the Battle for Guadalcanal ceremonies at Honiara, Guadalcanal in the Solomon Islands, Aug. 7, 2017. Solomon Scouts and Coastwatchers provided invaluable support and aid to the Allied effort during World War II. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Tara Molle.

Honoring the 75th anniversary of Douglas Munro’s actions at Guadalcanal

Today we reflect on the 75th anniversary of the attack on Guadalcanal and the heroic efforts of Signalman First Class Douglas Munro.


This iconic image from the Battle of Guam testifies to the strong bonds forged between the Marine Corps and the Coast Guard over the course of the Pacific War. Coast Guard Collection.

The Long Blue Line: The “Green Hell” of Guadalcanal

Called “The Canal” by the men who fought there, Guadalcanal was the first Allied amphibious operation of the Pacific War and a laboratory for analyzing the latest amphibious tactics and landing craft designs. It was also the campaign where the Coast Guard forged a relationship with the Marine Corps that grew stronger over the course of the war and continues to this day. The two services fought side-by-side to defeat the enemy and a Coast Guard coxswain or beachmaster was often the last comrade a marine might see before hitting the beaches or marching into the jungle.


The Long Blue Line: The “Gold Dust Twins” and the battle of Guadalcanal (Part 2)

The Guadalcanal campaign began on Thursday, August 7, 1942, exactly eight months after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. With its lush jungle cover and tropical waters, Guadalcanal was a picturesque contrast of deep green and azure blue. But for all its natural beauty, Guadalcanal was also a fearful place to fight a war. This is Part Two of the story of Coast Guardsmen fighting in the battle of Guadalcanal during WWII.


The Long Blue Line: The “Gold Dust Twins” and the battle of Guadalcanal (Part 1)

The Guadalcanal campaign began on Thursday, August 7, 1942, exactly eight months after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. With its lush jungle cover and tropical waters, Guadalcanal was a picturesque contrast of deep green and azure blue. But for all its natural beauty, Guadalcanal was also a fearful place to fight a war. This is Part One of the story of Coast Guardsmen fighting in the battle of Guadalcanal during WWII.


Remembering Munro

Remembering Munro

“Upon regaining consciousness his only question was ‘Did they get off?’, and so died with a smile on his face and the full knowledge that he had successfully accomplished a dangerous mission.” Read more about Signalman 1st Class Douglas Munro’s heroism during the Battle of Guadalcanal.


Petty Officer 3rd Class Noel Cordero poses for a photo while transiting through the Grenville Channel in British Columbia, Canada. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Dale Arnould.

Honor, Respect, Devotion to Duty: SK2 Noel Cordero

Military leadership is often perceived as those who hold a high rank, part of a command staff, who foster the development of their junior members to one day become leaders themselves. But as with Coast Guardsmen like Petty Officer 2nd Class Noel Cordero, a junior member aboard the Coast Guard Cutter Alex Haley, a good leader can come from any rank.


A memorial to Signalman 1st Class Douglas Munro at Guadalcanal. U.S. Coast Guard photo.

Coast Guard, Marines, Nation remember Signalman 1st Class Douglas Munro

Ask any Coast Guard man or woman and any Marine about Douglas Munro and you will instantly be taken back to the fateful day in 1942 when a Coast Guardsman gave his life so a detachment of Marines might live. To a woman or man, each will recite Munro’s last words to his best friend, Ray Evans, “Did they get off?” In many ways, Munro’s sacrifice is at the very core of the close relationship between the two services. And, all who hear Munro’s story instantly understand the bond between American brothers and sisters in arms and the true meaning of service to nation.


Commissioing ceremony for the Coast Guard Cutter Raymond Evans. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Patrick Kelley.

Evans and Munro reunited in Coast Guard fleet

“Raymond Evans’ memory, character and legacy is a part of our Coast Guard culture,” said Coast Guard Commandant Adm. Paul Zukunft. “Nothing could be more fitting than to commission a fast response cutter in his name – his spirit will live on in the Coast Guard Cutter Raymond Evans.”


US Coast Guard Art Program 2014 Collection, "Above the Seneca"

The Coast Guard on canvas: 2014 Art Program

The dedication and character of the men and women of the U.S. Coast Guard provide inspiration for many across the nation. Some of the most inspired are Coast Guard artists who belong to the Coast Guard Art Program. Whether sculptor or painter, these select artists create works of art that tell the story of the service’s missions, heroes and history. This week, the Coast Guard Art Program will hold its inaugural exhibition of the 2014 collection at the Salmagundi Club in New York City. Today, we feature three members of the Coast Guard Art Program who have been inspired by the Coast Guard’s missions and people: James Consor, Tyson Snow and Karen Loew.


memorial

The nation’s highest honor

The Coast Guard’s Pacific Tactical Law Enforcement Team was embarked aboard the U.S. Navy destroyer USS Kidd in support of the Oceania Maritime Security Initiative and the Western and Central Pacific Fisheries Commission. Together, with their defense partners, the six-member law enforcement team led fisheries enforcement programs designed to assist Pacific island nations with bolstering their economies through the management and protection of vital fish stocks. Due to the historic significance of the South Pacific, these servicemembers thought about the magnitude of their setting; they were transiting waters that were host to some of the most famous battles in U.S. military history.


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