Fire boat response crews battle the blazing remnants of the off shore oil rig Deepwater Horizon, April 21, 2010. A Coast Guard MH-65C dolphin rescue helicopter and crew document the fire aboard the mobile offshore drilling unit Deepwater Horizon, while searching for survivors April 21. Multiple Coast Guard helicopters, planes and cutters responded to rescue the Deepwater Horizon's 126 person crew. U.S. Coast Guard photo.

The Long Blue Line: local enforcer to global responder—nearly 230 years of Coast Guard evolution!

In 1790, Alexander Hamilton established a small fleet of coastal law enforcement vessels to patrol off East Coast seaports. Over the next 228 years, the service experienced rapid growth in its geographic area of responsibility, mandated missions, and organization through mergers with other maritime services, reorganizations, and transfers from one federal agency to another. These frequent changes demanded remarkable flexibility and resourcefulness of the Coast Guard. The service has lived-up to its motto Semper Paratus by adapting and evolving to meet the nation’s changing needs emerging as a global responder known and respected at home and abroad.


The Liberian-flagged tanker Argo Merchant sinks off the coast of Massachusetts in 1976. U.S. Coast Guard photo.

The Long Blue Line: the Coast Guard’s environmental protection mission

The Coast Guard has been a steward of the nation’s maritime environment for nearly 200 years. It has expanded and adapted its mission to ever-changing natural and man-made threats to the oceans and inland waterways. The service now supports five environmental protection missions.


225 Years of Service to Nation

225 years of Service to Nation: Marine environmental protection

The U.S. Coast Guard has been the steward of the nation’s maritime environment since the 1820s. This mission dates back to 1822, when Congress tasked the U.S. Revenue Cutter Service with monitoring Federal forest preserves that provided specialized ship timber required for construction of U.S Navy warships.


What Deepwater Horizon taught us about being Always Ready

One of the greatest tests of the Coast Guard’s ability to surge forces in response to a major contingency occurred five years ago today when the mobile offshore drilling unit Deepwater Horizon exploded and caught fire in the Gulf of Mexico. In the immediate aftermath of the explosion, the Coast Guard responded along with others in the maritime community. While the collective response saved 115 people from the rig’s crew, 11 lives were tragically lost.


Chief Petty Officer Barry Hollenbeck poses in front of the Coast Guard Ethos at Coast Guard Training Center Cape May, N.J., after the internet release of his marching cadence “In the Coast Guard” Sept. 26, 2013. Hollenbeck, a company commander at Training Center Cape May, has been selected as one of the Coast Guard’s Top 5 Cadence authors of 2013. Coast Guard photo by Chief Warrant Officer Donnie Brzuska.

Cadence Contest 2013: In the Coast Guard

Chief Petty Officer Barry Hollenbeck had just reported to Coast Guard Sector New York in the summer of 2010 to serve as a team leader in the safety and security operations branch when the call came in. Hollenbeck was to report to Hopedale, La., in support of the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill response to lead the decontamination assessment team at the Hopedale Incident Command Post. Hollenbeck had not even had a chance to unpack from his family’s recent move from Virginia, and he left his wife, Sine, and their two children in a sea of boxes to answer the call.


Celebrating 30 years of Coast Guard art

This year marks the 30th anniversary of the Coast Guard Art Program. Co-founded by esteemed military artist George Gray in 1981, COGAP and the more than 1,800 works of fine art in its collection are a testament to the rich […]


Adm. Bob Papp

Adm. Papp: One year and on track

Last Friday, I had the opportunity to see first-hand many areas devastated by Mississippi River flooding. I also got to see Coast Guard men and women in action, engaging their unique skills, authorities and capabilities to protect people who have been impacted by these rising waters. It was reminiscent of last summer when I began my term and we were embroiled in the Deepwater Horizon oil spill cleanup.


Coast Guard Foundation logo. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Ademide Adedokun.

Coast Guard Foundation honors Deepwater Horizon responders

Last week, the Coast Guard Foundation presented the Guardian of the Heartland award to the flight crews who took part in the search and rescue mission following the explosion of the Deepwater Horizon oil rig one year ago today. The aircrews were honored with tributes from U.S. Senator Mary Landrieu, Vice Adm. Sally Brice-O’Hara and Rear Adm. Mary Landry, Coast Guard 8th District commander.


NEW ORLEANS -- Vice Adm. Sally Brice-O'Hara, vice commandant of the U.S. Coast Guard, presents the Certificate of Valor to Alwin J. Landry, master of the offshore supply vessel Damon B. Bankston, during an awards ceremony at Coast Guard Air Station New Orleans, April 15, 2011. The Coast Guard recognized Landry and his crew for their efforts, which assisted Coast Guard helicopter crews with the rescue of 115 individuals from the Mobile Offshore Drilling Unit Deepwater Horizon on April 20, 2010. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Bill Colclough.

Good Samaritans recognized for Deepwater Horizon rescues

When the mobile offshore drilling unit Deepwater Horizon exploded and caught fire April 20, 2010, her crew fought bravely for first their vessel, then their lives and those of their shipmates. The surviving crewmembers were rescued by a rapid and […]


JIATF-South deployment

Coast Guard aircrews honored for excellence

Although the birth of naval aviation is traced back to 1911, it wasn’t until almost 30 years later that one of the Coast Guard’s most powerful assets, the helicopter, became part of naval flight. In the spring of 1943, then […]


Next Page »