Coast Guard Petty Officer 2nd Class Cassandra Kintzley, a gunner’s mate at Coast Guard Sector Boston, works at the Fort Devens firing range, in Massachusetts, Sept. 20, 2017, to qualify Coast Guard members in weapons handling. Kintzley, a highly skilled shooter, trains Coast Guard men and women who enforce maritime laws, and protect Northeast ports and waterways. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Cynthia Oldham.

Honor, Respect, Devotion to Duty: Petty Officer 2nd Class Cassandra Kintzley

With a sharp eye and soft hand, Petty Officer 2nd Class Cassandra Kintzley trains Coast Guard men and women who enforce maritime laws, and protect Northeast ports and waterways. Her delicate instructing style helps ease newcomers’ nerves on the range. Her goal is not only teaching people to shoot, but to instill necessary confidence when using a weapon.


Below Zero: New England aircrews take on frigid winter weather

When the forecast calls for visible moisture, the risk of flying gets more challenging for the pilots and crew. Aircrews from Coast Guard Air Station Cape Cod are up for the challenge.


Below Zero Kick Off – Coast Guard’s Cold Weather Operations

January and February are the most common coldest months throughout the nation. It’s a time when many Coast Guard units participate in domestic icebreaking and ice rescues. During this month-long campaign, we want to stress cold weather safety for those who may be near water or ice with the help of our National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and International Ice Patrol partners as well as various Coast Guard units.


Behind the scenes of Coast Guard search and rescue

Though their voices are always heard over the radio and they save countless lives, Coast Guard operations specialists are rarely seen by the maritime community they serve. Behind the scenes these Coast Guard men and women obtain vital information to rescue mariners and careful plan and coordinate search and rescue missions.


The name of Petty Officer 3rd Class Alfred Warm is displayed on a granite memorial, Sunday, July 3, 2016, on Mount Tom near Holyoke, Massachusetts. The memorial honors 25 service members who lost their lives when the B-17 they were flying in crashed on July 9, 1946. U.S Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer Andrew Barresi.

Labor of love: Strangers keep service members’ memories alive 70 years after crash

Seventy years ago a plane bound for Massachusetts with 25 service members returning from Greenland following the end of WWII crashed into a mountain. All 25 lives, including 15 Coast Guardsmen, each with unique stories and hopes for the future, were lost upon impact. For 50 years the crash site went unmarked until a group of dedicated volunteers decided that the 25 departed deserved more.