The June 1936 simultaneous commissioning of Campbell, Duane, Ingham and Taney at the Philadelphia Navy Yard. U.S. Coast Guard photo.

The Long Blue Line: 327-foot Secretary Class Cutters “the ships that wouldn’t die”

The Secretary-class cutters proved very dependable, versatile and long-lived warships. They became the backbone of the Coast Guard’s high-endurance cutter fleet after World War II and served as maritime workhorses performing all of the missions demanded of high seas cutters.


Pearl Harbor

Pearl Harbor: 5 things you didn’t know about the Coast Guard that day

While most know that Coast Guard Cutter Taney took part in the battle of Dec. 7, 1941, with the attacks on Pearl Harbor, many don’t realize that the Coast Guard had quite a number of units and personnel who took part in the U.S. defense of Hawaii on that Sunday. Here are five more things you may not have known about the Coast Guard’s involvement at Pearl Harbor.


Signalmen 1st Class Harry Nelson and Carpenter's Mate 3rd Class Jim Kitchen salute the national ensign during a Pearl Harbor Day ceremony aboard the retired Coast Guard Cutter Taney in Baltimore, Md., Dec. 7, 2013. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Patrick Kelley.

Remember the Taney

Each year, as veterans groups and public officials participate in events marking the anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor and America’s official entry into World War II, Coast Guardsmen past and present gather to remember those lost that day and to celebrate the resilience of our nation in the form of the one U.S. warship that did survive the attack, Coast Guard Cutter Taney.


Adm. Papp remembers 70th anniversary of Pearl Harbor

Coast Guard Commandant Adm. Bob Papp provided keynote remarks at a Pearl Harbor remembrance aboard the decommissioned Coast Guard Cutter Taney in Baltimore today. This year is both the 70th anniversary of the Pearl Harbor attack and 25th anniversary of […]


History: Coast Guard Cutter Taney

Written by the Coast Guard Historian’s Office. Roger B. Taney was commissioned Oct. 24, 1936. The 327-foot cutter was designed to meet the changing missions of the service as it emerged from the Prohibition era. Taney and crew arrived in […]