Dr. Jason Gobat of the Applied Physics Laboratory at the University of Washington,, Oct. 3, 2018, about 715 miles north of Barrow, Alaska. Gobat is the lead engineer who designed, built and programmed a series of sea gliders, which are autonomous submarines used to measure water conductivity, temperature, depth, oxygen and other measurements in the Arctic Ocean. Once deployed, the sea gliders are controlled by pilots at the Applied Physics Lab at the University of Washington in Seattle. Approximately 30 scientists are aboard the Healy to study stratified ocean dynamics and how environmental factors affect the water below the ice surface for the Office of Naval Research. The Healy is one of two ice breakers in U.S. service and is the only military ship dedicated to conducting ice research in the Arctic. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Senior Chief Petty Officer NyxoLyno Cangemi.

From kitchen timers to autonomous Seagliders™

In September, Dr. Jason Gobat and a team of about 30 engineers and scientists deployed aboard the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Healy in support of a departmental research initiative for the Office of Naval Research. The project, led by friend and colleague Dr. Craig Lee, attempts to better understand how the Arctic ice, atmosphere and water interact. This team deployed sea gliders to help them measure water conductivity, temperature, depth and oxygen.


The U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Healy (WAGB-20) in the ice, Oct. 3, 2018, about 715 miles north of Barrow, Alaska, in the Arctic. The Healy is in the Arctic with a team of about 30 scientists and engineers aboard deploying sensors and autonomous submarines to study stratified ocean dynamics and how environmental factors affect the water below the ice surface for the Office of Naval Research. The Healy, which is homeported in Seattle, is one of two ice breakers in U.S. service and is the only military ship dedicated to conducting research in the Arctic. U.S. Coast Guard photo by NyxoLyno Cangemi.

Coast Guard icebreaker crew completes second 2018 Arctic mission

The crew of the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Healy completed their second mission of their Arctic West Summer 2018 deployment Thursday, Oct. 18. Mission 1802 was a scientific mission to study stratified ocean dynamics in the Arctic (SODA) for the Office of Naval Research. Healy is one of two icebreakers in U.S. service that serves American interests in the region helping us better understand, plan and prepare for increased human activity.


Mapping the extended continental shelf in the Arctic

The crew of the service’s most technologically advanced polar icebreaker, Coast Guard Cutter Healy, has been assisting Dr. Larry Mayer and his team from University of New Hampshire’s (UNH) National Center for Coastal and Ocean Mapping with mapping the areas of the Arctic where the U.S. has potential rights to extend its continental shelf. The Healy crew acts as the backbone for groundbreaking science, providing presence and access throughout the Arctic to execute Coast Guard missions, project national sovereignty, and fulfill treaty obligations.


Spotting the mission: Coast Guard Cutter Healy’s Atlas

Sometimes, just like a weightlifter, even the best Coast Guard crew can use a spotter. With mechanical engineers from Coast Guard Base Seattle’s Naval Engineering Division and select civil contract technicians, the crew is able to get the job done with a little support from their spotters.


Coast Guard Cutter Healy: Still breaking the way

Coast Guard Cutter Healy’s mission has been devoted to service in Alaskan and Arctic waters since it first sailed. This summer, Healy’s crew and scientists from both the University of Alaska-Anchorage and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration made several ground-breaking discoveries while plying the frigid waters of the Arctic Chukchi Sea. Read more to find out how they helped improve knowledge and understanding of the rapidly changing region.


Kenny Cook feature photo

Life aboard a Coast Guard icebreaker

Petty Officer Kenny Cook, a boatswain’s mate aboard the Coast Guard Cutter Healy, gives a first-hand account of life aboard the Coast Guard’s largest icebreaker.


Extraordinary Polar Ice Lemonade by FS2 Ethan Sanders. Photo credit ENS Brian Hagerty.

Dessert First – Extraordinary Polar Ice Lemonade

Each Tuesday during the month of August, our very own Coast Guard food service specialists will share some of their favorite dessert recipes so you can have dessert first! This recipe comes to us from the Arctic where Coast Guard Cutter Healy has been conducting icebreaking operations to advance scientific research. Enjoy!


Coast Guard tests Digital Lightship capabilitiy

Coast Guard tests ‘Digital Lightship’ capabilities

From distant lights on the horizon to information at a navigator’s fingertips, the U.S. Coast Guard’s Aids to Navigation, ATON, systems have evolved over the years to keep up with technological advances and changing navigation requirements.


Geotraces 2015: Down to a science

As the Arctic region continues to open up to development, the data gathered onboard Healy, as well as the Coast Guard’s ability to maintain access and presence in the Arctic, will become ever more essential to understanding how this part of the world works, and how to most responsibly exercise stewardship over the region.


Geotraces 2015: Semester at sea

Fifty scientists joined the crew of Coast Guard Cutter Healy during the cutter’s most recent mission, including several world-renowned researchers in the fields of oceanography, chemistry, and biology. Considering the science party onboard, the rich waters below, and the sea birds punctuating the skies above, one would be hard pressed to find a more ideal location for an oceanography course.


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