State of the Coast Guard 2018

Last week, Adm. Zukunft gave his final “State of Coast Guard Address” at the historic National Press Club in Washington, D.C. In his address, Adm. Zukunft used the events of the past year to highlight how each Coast Guard member […]


Arctic stakeholders gain momentum through historic forum

U.S. Coast Guard Commandant Adm. Paul Zukunft (right) and the heads of seven other Arctic nations’ coast guards sign a joint statement that establishes the frameworks that detail the development of a multi-year strategic plan, avenues to share information, highlight best practices, identify training exercises, and on-the-water combined operations to achieve safe, secure and environmentally-responsible maritime activity in the Arctic.


A memorial to Signalman 1st Class Douglas Munro at Guadalcanal. U.S. Coast Guard photo.

Coast Guard, Marines, Nation remember Signalman 1st Class Douglas Munro

Ask any Coast Guard man or woman and any Marine about Douglas Munro and you will instantly be taken back to the fateful day in 1942 when a Coast Guardsman gave his life so a detachment of Marines might live. To a woman or man, each will recite Munro’s last words to his best friend, Ray Evans, “Did they get off?” In many ways, Munro’s sacrifice is at the very core of the close relationship between the two services. And, all who hear Munro’s story instantly understand the bond between American brothers and sisters in arms and the true meaning of service to nation.


Coast Guard Commandant, Adm. Paul Zukunft, recognizes Petty Officer 2nd Class Matthew Baasch from Coast Guard Cutter Bertholf in Alameda, Calif., Sept. 16, 2014, for his role in two separate counter narcotics off the coast of Colombia. The crew of Cutter Bertholf recently returned from a 140-day patrol off the coast of South America. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Patrick Kelley.

Honor, Respect, Devotion to Duty: GM2 Matthew Baasch

Sometimes a person gets a weird feeling in the pit of their stomach because there is more to a situation than meets the eye. This feeling is commonly referred to as a person’s “sixth sense.” Coast Guard boarding officers are trained to follow that “sixth sense” while they’re conducting counter narcotics operations in the Eastern Pacific and Caribbean Basin. That’s exactly what happened to Petty Officer Matthew Baasch and a boarding team from the Cutter Bertholf when they climbed aboard the fishing vessel Goliat I off the coast of Colombia on June 28.


Petty Officer 1st Class Rachid Arnik, a rescue swimmer at Air Station Kodiak, Alaska. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Kelly Parker.

So others may live: AST1 Rachid Arnick

So others may live. It’s the creed of the aviation rescue swimmer community and a promise to those in danger that when a Coast Guard rescue swimmer enters the water, she or he will do everything in their power – including risk their own life – to save you. Petty Officer 1st Class Rachid Arnick kept that promise and proved he was willing to risk his own life so others may live on the morning of Sept. 21, 2013, in the frigid waters of the Bering Sea.


Commissioing ceremony for the Coast Guard Cutter Raymond Evans. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Patrick Kelley.

Evans and Munro reunited in Coast Guard fleet

“Raymond Evans’ memory, character and legacy is a part of our Coast Guard culture,” said Coast Guard Commandant Adm. Paul Zukunft. “Nothing could be more fitting than to commission a fast response cutter in his name – his spirit will live on in the Coast Guard Cutter Raymond Evans.”


Memorabilia showcased at a memorial service for Senior Chief Petty Officer Terrrell Horne III. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Timothy Tamargo.

Coast Guard to name cutter for BMCS Terrell Horne III

Coast Guard Commandant Adm. Paul Zukunft announced today the Coast Guard will name a cutter in honor of Senior Chief Petty Officer Terrell Horne III who died on Dec. 2, 2012, while carrying out law enforcement operations near Santa Cruz, California. The Commandant personally informed the Horne family earlier today a fast response cutter will bear Terrell’s name in honor of his sacrifice and faithful service in defense of his nation.


Adm. Paul F. Zukunft departs his change of command ceremony. Zukunft assumed command as the 25th Commandant of the United States Coast Guard. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Patrick Kelley.

Adm. Paul F. Zukunft assumes command of U.S. Coast Guard

Moments ago, Adm. Paul F. Zukunft assumed command of the United States Coast Guard in a change of command ceremony teeming with naval tradition at Douglas A. Munro Coast Guard Headquarters in Washington, D.C. As the 25th Commandant of the Coast Guard, Zukunft will lead the largest component of the Department of Homeland Security, comprised of 41,700 active duty, 7,800 reserve and 8,300 civilian personnel as well as 31,000 volunteer Coast Guard auxiliarists.