Coast Guard VeteranTristan Heaton continues service with the Department of Veteran's Affairs, acting as the head of their summer Adaptive Sports programs. Photo courtesy of the Department of Veterans Affairs.

Veterans Day: Paying service forward

Members who serve in any of the five armed services earn a highly coveted title that can never be taken from them: Veteran. Coast Guard Veteran Tristan Heaton has utilized the skills and training gained in his service to help other veterans as part of the Department of Veteran’s Affairs Adaptive Sports program.


AST3 Bates

Honor, Respect, Devotion to Duty: AST3 Brett Bates

So others may live. It’s the creed of Coast Guard rescue swimmers and a promise the Coast Guard makes to those in danger. It’s also a motto that Petty Officer 3rd Class Brett Bates lives by.


Seaman Derrian Duryea swims through the water

Chasing a dream

Listening to the helicopter’s rotor blades slice through the night sky while watching his feet dangle above the turbulent water, the words “never quit,” repeated over and over in his head. Never quit – words Seaman Derrian Duryea repeated to himself before high school swim meets and now words he lives by as a Coast Guardsman.


red flare

New year, new filter: AST1 Ian Powell

The Coast Guard continues our #NewYearNewFilter and the launch of our official Instagram account with a new perspective this week! We’ve asked Coast Guard members from around the fleet to be guest Instagrammers and in the past two weeks you’ve seen perspectives from Seaman Frank Iannazzo-Simmons at Patrol Forces Southwest Asia and Chief Warrant Officer Donnie Brzuska at Training Center Cape May. This week, Petty Officer 1st Class Ian Powell will use Instagram to share his unique perspectives in what it takes to be a Coast Guard rescue swimmer.


jump

Do you have what it takes?

To prepare for whatever may come their way, rescue swimmers, or aviation survival technicians, train at the Aviation Technical Training Center in Elizabeth City, N.C., the Coast Guard’s technical training provider for enlisted aviation forces. Take a look at this training exercise where rescue swimmers use what they learn from day one in a simulated emergency.


Training flight

Living your creed

A call came in from cruise ship, 150 miles east of Cape Lookout, N.C. A 50-year-old man suffered a heart attack and needed to get to a hospital. It was operations normal for most; another chance to save a life. However, for one junior petty officer, this case was far from the norm. He would be setting out on his first rescue since earning his spot as the Coast Guard rescue swimmer No. 830.


Chief Petty Officer Karen Voorhees

First female rescue swimmer promoted to chief petty officer

Chief Petty Officer Karen Voorhees is the first woman to advance to chief petty officer in the rate of aviation survival technician since women were integrated into Coast Guard active duty service in 1973.


Shallow water rescue Featured Image

Getting people out of bad situations

This story originally appeared at Coast Guard Pacific Southwest and was written by Petty Officer 1st Class Thomas McKenzie and Petty Officer 1st Class Rachel Polish. It began with a 911 call from someone stranded aboard a 17-foot recreation boat […]


Peaches

Don’t get carried away

Winter is a particularly dangerous time to be on the beaches of Northern California. Tragically, every year, people and their pets fall victim to sneaker waves. A sneaker wave is a large wave in a series of coastal waves. They frequently catch beachgoers, dog walkers and dogs off guard and wash them out to sea.


Aircrew

Shipmate of the Week – CWO Randall Rice

Two sailors were in for the trip of their lives as they set out sailing from Florida to Greece in May 2011. But the trip of their lives didn’t end in Greece, it ended in the shelter of a Coast Guard helicopter’s cabin. The 45-foot sailing vessel Eva was 150 nautical miles southeast of Cape Cod and had hit a nasty storm early into their journey. Water was streaming in and the vessel’s pumps could not keep up. The pounding winds had ripped the mast off the vessel and shattered its windows. There was no doubt; these sailors were in trouble.


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