During Arctic Technology Evaluation 2018, the AeroVironment Puma unmanned aircraft system and a Coast Guard unmanned surface vessel were deployed together to test the feasibility of using multiple unmanned systems as a communications link over larger areas. Patrick Ryan, a researcher in the Systems Branch at the Coast Guard Research and Development Center, readies the UAS before launch. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Alexandra Swan.

Research, Development, Test and Evaluation Spotlight: Arctic Technology Evaluation 2018

The Coast Guard’s objectives in the Arctic include advancing U.S. security interests and pursuing responsible stewardship of the area. Two components of that strategy – maritime domain awareness and protection of the delicate environment – were the focus of the Coast Guard Research, Development, Test and Evaluation Program’s 2018 Arctic Technology Evaluation held in late July in Alaska. The event enables the Coast Guard to gain efficiencies by evaluating multiple technologies that have the potential to enhance future Coast Guard operations in harsh environments.


From left to right, multipurpose offshore patrol vessel ICGV Thor (Iceland), frigate HDMS Vaedderen (Denmark, medium river icebreaker CCGS Pierre Radisson (Canada), medium endurance U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Spencer, and offshore patrol vessel NOCGV Andenes (Norway) sail in formation during exercise "Arctic Guardian 2017." U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Frank Iannazzo-Simmons.

Historic exercise tests search and rescue capabilities in the Arctic

The Arctic Coast Guard Forum consisting of members from Canada, Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, Sweden, the Russian Federation and the United States coordinated an exercise to test search and rescue capabilities in the Arctic. The “Arctic Guardian 2017” exercises took place in Reykjavik, Iceland, testing cooperation, coordination, and communication across partner nations’ rescue coordination centers.


The crew of U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Maple follows the crew of Canadian coast guard icebreaker Terry Fox through the icy waters of Franklin Strait, in Nunavut, Canada, Aug. 12, 2017. The Canadian coast guard assisted Maple's crew by breaking and helping navigate through ice during several days of Maple's 2017 Northwest Passage transit. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Nate Littlejohn.

Allies in the Arctic

The Canadian coast guard assisted the crew of Coast Guard Cutter Maple by breaking and helping navigate through ice during several days of Maple’s 2017 Northwest Passage transit. This is the 60th anniversary of the last transit by a Coast Guard cutter, and 150th anniversary of the Coast Guard’s presence in Alaska.


Coast Guard and America’s future as an Arctic nation

Gov. Christine Todd Whitman recently visited the U.S. Coast Guard Academy to speak about leadership and the Coast Guard’s future in the Arctic, during the 22nd annual Coast Guard Foundation Hedrick Fellowship.


Below Zero: Partnership between the Coast Guard and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

For more than 200 years, the U.S. Coast Guard and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration have partnered together in maritime resiliency, environmental sustainability and scientific research. The two services have a strong working relationship supporting and representing the U.S. in cold weather operations and Arctic initiatives.


Mapping the extended continental shelf in the Arctic

The crew of the service’s most technologically advanced polar icebreaker, Coast Guard Cutter Healy, has been assisting Dr. Larry Mayer and his team from University of New Hampshire’s (UNH) National Center for Coastal and Ocean Mapping with mapping the areas of the Arctic where the U.S. has potential rights to extend its continental shelf. The Healy crew acts as the backbone for groundbreaking science, providing presence and access throughout the Arctic to execute Coast Guard missions, project national sovereignty, and fulfill treaty obligations.


Coast Guard Cutter Healy: Still breaking the way

Coast Guard Cutter Healy’s mission has been devoted to service in Alaskan and Arctic waters since it first sailed. This summer, Healy’s crew and scientists from both the University of Alaska-Anchorage and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration made several ground-breaking discoveries while plying the frigid waters of the Arctic Chukchi Sea. Read more to find out how they helped improve knowledge and understanding of the rapidly changing region.


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Coast Guard charted the Northwest Passage in 1957 and continues to play a lead role in the Arctic today

In July of 1957, the Coast Guard was tasked with establishing and charting a successful path through the Northwest Passage in response to defense concerns caused by Cold War tensions with the Soviet Union. In October, 1957, three Coast Guard cutters accomplished what no other U.S. vessels had done before — they transited through the icy seas of the Northwest Passage and circumnavigate the North American continent. Read the full story to learn more!


Arctic partnerships

Arctic Operations: Partnerships

Success in the Arctic depends on unity of effort among Arctic nations. Why? Because no single nation has the sovereignty, capacity or control over all the resources necessary to meet the emerging challenges in the Arctic. While in Greenland, Coast Guard Commandant Adm. Paul Zukunft and Sen. Angus King met with the Joint Arctic Command, government dignitaries, leaders of indigenous communities and members of the scientific community to learn more about how our missions may change in this complicated operating environment.


Capabilities

Arctic Operations: Capabilities

Environmental changes in the polar regions are boosting new economic opportunities and transforming maritime activity in the regions. Access to previously unreachable natural resources is now possible and is encouraging new sovereignty claims by Arctic nations.


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