Arctic Encounter Symposium 2016

Arctic Encounter Symposium 2016 – Breaking the ice on the Arctic’s future

As the demand for resources increases, the eco-tourism industry expands and destination-focused and trans-Arctic shipping routes cross waters previously blockaded by sea ice, the Coast Guard must be ready to operate in the Arctic. The Coast Guard men and women serving in the Arctic today aboard platforms like the Coast Guard Cutter Healy, which recently completed a historic trip to the North Pole, do so with the same sense of professional pride and excellence that started with the Coast Guard Cutter Bear 150 years ago.


Vice Commandant of the Coast Guard Vice Adm. Charles Michel enters the Rayburn House Office Building shortly before testifying with the House Committee on Foreign Affairs. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Patrick Kelley.

Vice Adm. Michel testifies at Arctic hearing

Coast Guard Vice Commandant Vice Adm. Charles Michel testified on Arctic operations before a joint subcommittee hearing held today that included the Subcommittee on Europe, Eurasia and Emerging Threats and the Subcommittee on the Western Hemisphere, both with the House Committee on Foreign Affairs.


U.S. Coast Guard photo.

The Long Blue Line: Iceberg Smith’s 1931 Graf Zeppelin Arctic Expedition

Passing over vast regions never seen by the human eye, discovering new landforms, exploring unknown and un-mapped areas of the Russian arctic in an Indian Jones-style adventure in 1931, Lt. Cmdr. Edward “Iceberg” Smith proved that polar exploration could be accomplished safely and comfortably with the aid of airship technology such as the Graf Zeppelin.


Petty Officer 1st Class Seth Carrington uses a thermal imager to detect heat sources while Petty Officer 3rd Class Donald Delach mans a fire hose during firefighting training aboard the Coast Guard Cutter Healy while underway near Kodiak, Alaska, Aug. 28, 2014. Crew members aboard Coast Guard vessels train regularly to mitigate a variety of potential shipboard emergencies, including fire and flooding. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Shawn Eggert.

Week in the life of the Coast Guard 2014: Weekend

This Weekend is the final post for the Week in the life of the Coast Guard 2014 series. We hope you enjoyed seeing and reading about your Coast Guard in action, as well as a typical week for us. What did you learn about the Coast Guard this week? What would like to know more about? You may contact us through Facebook or email us as well. We appreciate it!


Crewmembers from the Coast Guard Cutter Morgenthau assist in removing a brow from the Coast Guard Cutter Kukui prior to departing for a patrol, Aug. 25, 2014. Cutters rely on personnel from other units to assist in pier operations prior to departure. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Tara Molle.

Week in the life of the Coast Guard 2014: Thursday

Thursday’s week in the life of the Coast Guard 2014 features the Cutter Kukui from Hawaii, family day on the Delaware River, an unmanned Arctic flight from the Cutter Healy, dirty work in Newport, Oregon, and quick fixes at Base Honolulu.


Coast Guard RDC, Cutter Healy underway for Arctic Shield 2014

Coast Guard RDC, Cutter Healy underway for Arctic Shield 2014

A team of scientists from the Coast Guard Research and Development Center, New London, Connecticut, is currently underway aboard Coast Guard Cutter Healy for a series of technology evaluations in the Arctic. The team departed Seward, Alaska, August 8 and is currently conducting operations off the North Slope.


Arctic Rescue

Stuck in the Arctic

The 24 hours of sunlight, enormous marine mammals and vast emptiness create an environment unlike any in the world. It’s no surprise, then, that the melting ice is enticing adventure seekers to experience the untouched frontier. As vessel traffic increases, so does the chance for an accident in this inherently dangerous maritime region. It’s the inevitability of peril that drives many Coast Guard missions, and those missions extend all the way into the Nation’s Arctic. When an adventure on the Chukchi Sea took a turn for the worse, the Coast Guard was ready to respond.


Testimony

Vice Adm. Neffenger testifies on implementing US policy in the Arctic

Today, Coast Guard Vice Commandant Vice Adm. Peter Neffenger testified on implementing U.S. policy in the Arctic before the Subcommittee on Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation. The Vice Commandant led his opening statement by sharing his personal experience with Coast Guard operations in the Arctic; experiences that have shaped his understanding of the service’s role as the nation’s lead federal agency for ensuring maritime safety and security in the region.


Healy in the Arctic

Scientific adventures in the Arctic

Crewmembers aboard Coast Guard Cutter Healy recently supported scientific research in the Arctic’s dynamic waters. As the crew supported vital scientific research, they were joined by a multitude of scientists and support staff from the National Intelligence University, U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, U.S. Air Force, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and University of Alaska.


underway

Polar Star stands down from Antarctic rescue

The U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Polar Star was released by the Australian Maritime Safety Authority from search and rescue duties Jan. 7, following confirmation the Russian-Flagged Akademik Shokalskiy and Chinese-Flagged Xue Long are free from the Antarctic ice due to a favorable change in wind conditions. The Coast Guard Pacific Area command center received confirmation from the Australian Maritime Safety Authority at 2 p.m. Pacific Standard Time that both ships broke through the heavy ice, rendering assistance from the Polar Star no longer necessary.


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