Petty Officer 1st Class Seth Carrington uses a thermal imager to detect heat sources while Petty Officer 3rd Class Donald Delach mans a fire hose during firefighting training aboard the Coast Guard Cutter Healy while underway near Kodiak, Alaska, Aug. 28, 2014. Crew members aboard Coast Guard vessels train regularly to mitigate a variety of potential shipboard emergencies, including fire and flooding. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Shawn Eggert.

Week in the life of the Coast Guard 2014: Weekend

This Weekend is the final post for the Week in the life of the Coast Guard 2014 series. We hope you enjoyed seeing and reading about your Coast Guard in action, as well as a typical week for us. What did you learn about the Coast Guard this week? What would like to know more about? You may contact us through Facebook or email us as well. We appreciate it!


Crewmembers from the Coast Guard Cutter Morgenthau assist in removing a brow from the Coast Guard Cutter Kukui prior to departing for a patrol, Aug. 25, 2014. Cutters rely on personnel from other units to assist in pier operations prior to departure. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Tara Molle.

Week in the life of the Coast Guard 2014: Thursday

Thursday’s week in the life of the Coast Guard 2014 features the Cutter Kukui from Hawaii, family day on the Delaware River, an unmanned Arctic flight from the Cutter Healy, dirty work in Newport, Oregon, and quick fixes at Base Honolulu.


Coast Guard RDC, Cutter Healy underway for Arctic Shield 2014

Coast Guard RDC, Cutter Healy underway for Arctic Shield 2014

A team of scientists from the Coast Guard Research and Development Center, New London, Connecticut, is currently underway aboard Coast Guard Cutter Healy for a series of technology evaluations in the Arctic. The team departed Seward, Alaska, August 8 and is currently conducting operations off the North Slope.


Arctic Rescue

Stuck in the Arctic

The 24 hours of sunlight, enormous marine mammals and vast emptiness create an environment unlike any in the world. It’s no surprise, then, that the melting ice is enticing adventure seekers to experience the untouched frontier. As vessel traffic increases, so does the chance for an accident in this inherently dangerous maritime region. It’s the inevitability of peril that drives many Coast Guard missions, and those missions extend all the way into the Nation’s Arctic. When an adventure on the Chukchi Sea took a turn for the worse, the Coast Guard was ready to respond.


Testimony

Vice Adm. Neffenger testifies on implementing US policy in the Arctic

Today, Coast Guard Vice Commandant Vice Adm. Peter Neffenger testified on implementing U.S. policy in the Arctic before the Subcommittee on Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation. The Vice Commandant led his opening statement by sharing his personal experience with Coast Guard operations in the Arctic; experiences that have shaped his understanding of the service’s role as the nation’s lead federal agency for ensuring maritime safety and security in the region.


Healy in the Arctic

Scientific adventures in the Arctic

Crewmembers aboard Coast Guard Cutter Healy recently supported scientific research in the Arctic’s dynamic waters. As the crew supported vital scientific research, they were joined by a multitude of scientists and support staff from the National Intelligence University, U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, U.S. Air Force, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and University of Alaska.


underway

Polar Star stands down from Antarctic rescue

The U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Polar Star was released by the Australian Maritime Safety Authority from search and rescue duties Jan. 7, following confirmation the Russian-Flagged Akademik Shokalskiy and Chinese-Flagged Xue Long are free from the Antarctic ice due to a favorable change in wind conditions. The Coast Guard Pacific Area command center received confirmation from the Australian Maritime Safety Authority at 2 p.m. Pacific Standard Time that both ships broke through the heavy ice, rendering assistance from the Polar Star no longer necessary.


The Polar Star is the U.S. Coast Guard’s only active heavy polar icebreaker. The ship is 399 feet in length, its maximum speed is 18 knots and it is able to continuously break six feet of ice at three knots and 21 feet of ice backing and ramming. U.S. Coast Guard photo.

U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Polar Star to assist vessels in Antarctica

The U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Polar Star is responding to a Jan. 3rd request from the Australian Maritime Safety Authority, AMSA, to assist the Russian-Flagged Akademik Shokalskiy and Chinese-Flagged Xue Long that are reportedly ice-bound in the Antarctic. The Russian and Chinese Governments have also requested assistance from the United States.


Arctic Flight, video of the year competition. U.S. Coast Guard image.

2013 Videos of the Year: Arctic Flight

The eighth video of the contest takes us aboard a Coast Guard airplane with scientists from NOAA and the University of Washington’s Polar Science Center as they conduct extensive research to gain a better understanding of the emerging Arctic frontier. […]


U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Willow drifts by an ice berg during an Arctic patrol. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Luke Clayton.

Adm. Papp encourages international community to adopt Polar Code

Written by Christopher Lagan. In an address to the general assembly of the International Maritime Organization, Coast Guard Commandant Adm. Bob Papp encouraged the IMO to address the pressing issues facing the international shipping community, including the Arctic, piracy and […]


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