R1KU, an endangered Hawaiian monk seal. U.S. Coast Guard photo.

The transport of R1KU

Safeguarding marine mammals falls under the Coast Guard’s living marine resources mission, one of the service’s 11 statutory missions. The nation’s waterways and their ecosystems are vital to the country’s economy and health. This includes ensuring the country’s marine protected species are provided the protection necessary to help their populations recover to healthy, sustainable levels.


formation

Shipmate of the Week – SN Cody Reed

Coast Guard members display various awards, ribbons and badges they have earned throughout their careers upon their chests. From pilot wings to marine safety pins, the insignia worn on a uniform can tell you a lot about a servicemember’s career. One member, though early in his career, has something rare on his Coast Guard uniform – the coveted Army Air Assault Badge.


Hawaii airdrop

Airdrop at sea

Coast Guard aircraft are equipped to drop lifesaving equipment to individuals in distress. Life rafts, radios, emergency rations and medical supplies are the most common, but flexibility in operations is necessary in order to save lives at sea. This weekend, a Coast Guard aircrew flew approximately 1,036 miles to airdrop blood and medical supplies to a cruise ship northeast of the Hawaiian Islands.


salutes

Adm. Papp visits international partners Down Under

Adm. Papp toured the new Australian Customs and Border Protection Service patrol boat Cape St. George, visited Rescue Coordination Center Australia and received detailed briefings from the Royal Australian Navy and Australian Border Protection Command, a multi-agency task force that directs coordinated maritime governance operations.


Cutter Washington and Station Apra Harbor

Leaning forward on forward deployments

The 14th Coast Guard District is charged with protecting and patrolling more than 90,000 miles of coastline. In fact, of the total 3.4 million square nautical miles of U.S. Exclusive Economic Zone, 43 percent resides within this region. With such a large expanse of ocean to operate in, teamwork is critical in performing the many missions of the U.S. Coast Guard. It was this sense of teamwork and partnership that the two units – cutter and station – joined together.


Hercules in flight

Thinking outside the box

Drifting for five days 70 miles west of the Pacific atoll of Tarawa, three fishermen ate their last morsels of food and sipped the last drops of water; they were in trouble and they knew it. Suddenly an airplane from Coast Guard Air Station Barbers Point flew overhead. The fishermen were spotted. This rescue of three fishermen lost in the Pacific may not have happened at all were it not for the staff from Command, Control and Communications Engineering Center and contractors from Applied Science Associates some 7,000 miles away in Portsmouth, Va.


Fly over

Search and rescue: Oceania

Standing the Hawaiian Islands watch requires a force of on call specialists, always ready for the surge capacity nature of the job. Modern search and rescue methodology has sprinted forward in recent decades, keeping pace with evolving technology. Sometimes a Coast Guardsmen’s best lifesaving tool is not only more than two hundred year of lifesaving tradition, but also products of the digital era.


Whale breaching

Safeguarding the humpback whale

  Written by 14th Coast Guard District public affairs. The Coast Guard is a key protector of our nation’s critical marine habitats and the endangered species dependent on them. These ocean resources are particularly important to those in the 14th […]


Jarvis

Coast Guard Cutter Jarvis: The last cruise

A ship can accomplish anything with a proud crew. The spirit of all ships resides in the hearts of the crew, no matter where they go. With this in mind, we decided to focus on what we will be keeping with us instead of what we will be losing. Soon we will be leaving Jarvis behind for another ship, the Morgenthau. Yet, we will remain the same capable, hard charging crew.


MSA exercise

East meets West in historic exercise

History was made earlier this month when a Chinese Maritime Safety Administration ship pulled into the Port of Honolulu marking the first time an MSA patrol boat visited a U.S. port. The 367-foot MSA ship, Haixun 31, made the historic port call to participate in a combined search and rescue exercise alongside Coast Guard Cutter Galveston Island. Together the two ships, both with helicopters aboard, formed building blocks towards a cooperative partnership.


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