The Coast Guard rescues three missing divers near Penguin Bank, Molokai, Jan. 18, 2016. The divers were located at 4 p.m. six miles from their original location by a Coast Guard 45-foot Response Boat-Medium crew from Coast Guard Station Honolulu. U.S. Coast Guard photo.

Lost at sea: A whale’s tale

Locating a person adrift at sea is no easy task. With only a head visible, it can be difficult to spot someone bobbing on the water’s surface in the vast Pacific Ocean. Even magnified by binoculars, a shadow the size of a pencil eraser is nearly impossible to find amidst the waves and solar glare. In the case of three divers who went missing off Molokai, Jan. 18, 2016, their sighting by a boat crew could be credited to a sharp lookout and a little luck. Well, a combination of a sharp lookout, luck and a whale.


Makapu'u

Legacy of Light: World’s largest lens shines Aloha light

From the Makapu’u Light on Oahu’s southeastern most point, the world’s largest lighthouse lens reflects a beam that can be seen from 19 nautical miles away. The light sheperds mariners through the well traveled waters around the Aloha State from freighters transporting goods to fishing vessels, dive boats and cruise ships.


Shutter Shootout featured image

Shutter Shootout 2015: First Round (West)

We continue the first round of Shutter Shootout 2015 photo contest with our West bracket, which covers the 11th and 14th Coast Guard districts. Starting today, you can vote in the new West bracket at the Coast Guard’s Facebook page by simply clicking “like” on your favorite photos.


Petty Officer 2nd Class John Thompson, a boatswain's mate aboard the Coast Guard Cutter Sequoia, and Dr. Joe Haxel, a research assistant with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, prepare special floats used to deploy a hydrophone in Challenger Deep near the Federated States of Micronesia, Jan. 11, 2015. The crew of the Sequoia and NOAA scientists deployed the hydrophone in an attempt to listen to ambient sound in the deepest part of the Challenger Deep. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Tara Molle.

Listening to the deep

We know more about the surface of the Moon and Mars than we do about the ocean’s seafloor. With water encompassing 63.78 million square miles, the oceans cover 70 percent of the Earth’s surface, with the world’s largest body of water, the Pacific Ocean, covering roughly one third. The Pacific also boasts the deepest trenches, specifically Challenger Deep in the Mariana Trench near the Federated States of Micronesia. Given Challenger Deep’s inhospitable environment, no one has attempted to extensively record ambient sound at its full depth. That is, until now.


Coast Guard manages lava flow

Coast Guard technicians manage lava threat in Hawaii

It’s not every day that a lava flow threatens Coast Guard operations, but crews operating in Hawaii have been battling the complex issues presented by the recent Kilauea Volcano eruption to ensure equipment remains capable and crews remain Semper Paratus.


On patrol

Operation Rai Balang

Coast Guard cutters Assateague and Sequoia recently returned to Apra Harbor, Guam, after each cutter completed patrols as part of Operation Rai Balang, a regional fisheries operation between the United States, Federated States of Micronesia, Republic of Palau and Republic of Marshall Islands. The cutters combined transited more than 7,500 nautical miles over 40 days at sea through the Commonwealth of Northern Marianas Island’s exclusive economic zone and surrounding high seas.


R1KU, an endangered Hawaiian monk seal. U.S. Coast Guard photo.

The transport of R1KU

Safeguarding marine mammals falls under the Coast Guard’s living marine resources mission, one of the service’s 11 statutory missions. The nation’s waterways and their ecosystems are vital to the country’s economy and health. This includes ensuring the country’s marine protected species are provided the protection necessary to help their populations recover to healthy, sustainable levels.


formation

Shipmate of the Week – SN Cody Reed

Coast Guard members display various awards, ribbons and badges they have earned throughout their careers upon their chests. From pilot wings to marine safety pins, the insignia worn on a uniform can tell you a lot about a servicemember’s career. One member, though early in his career, has something rare on his Coast Guard uniform – the coveted Army Air Assault Badge.


Hawaii airdrop

Airdrop at sea

Coast Guard aircraft are equipped to drop lifesaving equipment to individuals in distress. Life rafts, radios, emergency rations and medical supplies are the most common, but flexibility in operations is necessary in order to save lives at sea. This weekend, a Coast Guard aircrew flew approximately 1,036 miles to airdrop blood and medical supplies to a cruise ship northeast of the Hawaiian Islands.


salutes

Adm. Papp visits international partners Down Under

Adm. Papp toured the new Australian Customs and Border Protection Service patrol boat Cape St. George, visited Rescue Coordination Center Australia and received detailed briefings from the Royal Australian Navy and Australian Border Protection Command, a multi-agency task force that directs coordinated maritime governance operations.


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