Petty Officer Second Class Paul F. Floge, a Coast Guard reservist with Coast Guard Port Security Unit 311 out of San Pedro, Calif., provides security with a .50 caliber machine gun on the Khawr al Amaya oil terminal off the coast of Iraq. Flodge, who works full time for the Los Angeles Police Department, is one of many reservists called to active duty in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom. U.S. Coast Guard photo.

The Long Blue Line: Coast Guard combat operations in Operation Iraqi Freedom

In Operation Iraqi Freedom, the Coast Guard demonstrated the importance of a naval force experienced in shallow-water operations, maritime interdiction operations, port security and aids to navigation work. The port security units performed their port security duties efficiently in spite of their units being divided between three separate port facilities and two oil terminals. Patrol boats operated for countless hours without maintenance in waters too shallow for Navy assets and served as the Coalition fleet’s workhorses in boarding, escort and force protection duties. OIF was just one of the many combat operations fought by the Coast Guard since 1790 and its heroes are among the many members of the long blue line.


Lt. Cmdr. Matt Walter is one of only 2,738 to have earned the international emergency management credential. U.S. Coast Guard photo.

Coast Guard officer earns emergency management credential

A Coast Guard officer who helped coordinate the response to Hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria has earned an international emergency management credential. Lt. Cmdr. Matthew J. Walter received the Certified Emergency Manager credential from the International Association of Emergency Managers in June 2018.


Nineteen packages of marijuana float near Naval Station Guantanamo Bay after being jettisoned off a small boat in June 2018. U.S. Coast Guard photo.

PSU 309, Coast Guard Cutter Vigilant team up to interdict illegal drugs

Coast Guard service members from Port Security Unit 309 and Coast Guard Cutter Vigilant often conduct missions very different from each other. Despite having different missions, these units often operate jointly with other Coast Guard assets and with international partners. In early June, members from both units collaborated to interdict illegal drugs approximately one mile from Naval Station Guantanamo Bay’s shoreline.


Coast Guard Petty Officer 2nd Class Elizabeth Haworth, auxiliary division member aboard Cutter Northland in Portsmouth, Va., poses for a photo in front of the cutter on Base Portsmouth, May 24, 2018. Haworth received the Coast Guard's MCPO Pearl Faurie Leadership Award at the 2018 Joint Women's Leadership Symposium in San Diego, June 21, 2018, and was recognized for her impactful leadership both on and off the cutter. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Cheryl Dixon.

Honor, Respect, Devotion to Duty: MK2 Elizabeth Haworth

Petty Officer 2nd Class Elizabeth Haworth was recently recognized with the Master Chief Petty Officer Pearl Faurie Inspiration Leadership award at the 2018 Joint Women’s Leadership Symposium in San Diego. Haworth is a leader, a mentor and a teacher. In her spare time, whether at homeport or on port calls, Haworth is an avid volunteer with local communities and president of the unit’s Leadership Diversity Advisory Council.


Fire boat response crews battle the blazing remnants of the off shore oil rig Deepwater Horizon, April 21, 2010. A Coast Guard MH-65C dolphin rescue helicopter and crew document the fire aboard the mobile offshore drilling unit Deepwater Horizon, while searching for survivors April 21. Multiple Coast Guard helicopters, planes and cutters responded to rescue the Deepwater Horizon's 126 person crew. U.S. Coast Guard photo.

The Long Blue Line: local enforcer to global responder—nearly 230 years of Coast Guard evolution!

In 1790, Alexander Hamilton established a small fleet of coastal law enforcement vessels to patrol off East Coast seaports. Over the next 228 years, the service experienced rapid growth in its geographic area of responsibility, mandated missions, and organization through mergers with other maritime services, reorganizations, and transfers from one federal agency to another. These frequent changes demanded remarkable flexibility and resourcefulness of the Coast Guard. The service has lived-up to its motto Semper Paratus by adapting and evolving to meet the nation’s changing needs emerging as a global responder known and respected at home and abroad.


U.S. Coast Guard photograph by Petty Officer 1st Class Seth Johnson

Hoax calls affect us all

Hoax calls happen all too frequently and not only impact the responders and community, but also waste time, money and resources at the taxpayers’ expense. Hoax calls are a Class D felony and incur substantial prison time and fines.


The U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Mellon (WHEC 717) and crew patrol along the Maritime Boundary Line between the U.S. and Russia in the Bering Sea, Alaska, May 25, 2018. The crew kept a lookout for illegal encroachments of the U.S. Exclusive Economic Zone by foreign fishing vessels. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Bill Colclough.

Lookouts of The Last Frontier

The Coast Guard Cutter Mellon, homeported in Seattle, and its 180 crew members embark every year on their Alaskan patrol from Dutch Harbor, Alaska, the nation’s top fishing port. The Mellon and its crew divide their patrols between the Pacific Ocean adjacent to Mexico and Guatemala. In the Eastern Pacific, offshore South America, the crew interdicts drug smugglers in the Joint Interagency Task Force – South area of responsibility.

In the Bering Sea, the Mellon crew keeps a lookout for mariners in distress and enforces laws and regulations related to the preservation of U.S. fisheries stocks.


Seaman Kenwyn Berkeley, crew member aboard Coast Guard Cutter Resolute, a 210-foot medium-endurance Reliance class cutter homeported in St. Petersburg, Fla., takes the Oath of Allegiance Friday, June 29, 2018, aboard the cutter to become a citizen during a U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services naturalization ceremony. Berkeley was required to take part in a series of tests and interviews administered by the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services as a part of the naturalization process. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Michael De Nyse.

Coast Guard member becomes a U.S. citizen in St. Petersburg

Seaman Kenwyn Berkeley, crew member aboard Coast Guard Cutter Resolute, a 210-foot medium-endurance Reliance class cutter homeported in St. Petersburg, Florida, took the Oath of Allegiance Friday, July 6, 2018, to become a citizen during a U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services naturalization ceremony.


Honor, Respect, Devotion to Duty: Aidalis Mills

Aidalis Mills has been a civil servant at the 9th Coast Guard District for over 20 years. As the Coast Guard Reserve funds manager for the 9th District, Mills’ job is to execute funding associated with reserve affairs for over 450 reservists across the district. She is also the Hispanic Emphasis program manager, a member of the Leadership and Diversity Advisory Committee, a Defense Finance and Accounting Service committee member and a volunteer within the community. Her selfless service has earned her the 2018 George R. Putnam Inspirational Leadership award. Read more to find out what inspires this inspirational leader.


Painting commissioned of Revenue Cutter McCulloch when it first set sail in 1897. U.S. Coast Guard Academy collection.

The Long Blue Line: McCulloch — fighting cutter of Manila Bay

During the ship’s 20-year career, McCulloch performed the missions of search and rescue, ice operations, law enforcement, environmental protection, humanitarian relief and maritime defense. The ship recorded many firsts, such as the first cutter to steam through the Mediterranean and Red seas, transit the Suez Canal, and visit the Far East by way of the Indian Ocean. In addition, its West Coast cruising territory extended from the Arctic and Alaska to southern California. Cutter McCulloch and the men who sailed it remain a part of the legend and the lore of the long blue line.


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