Petty Officer Second Class Paul F. Floge, a Coast Guard reservist with Coast Guard Port Security Unit 311 out of San Pedro, Calif., provides security with a .50 caliber machine gun on the Khawr al Amaya oil terminal off the coast of Iraq. Flodge, who works full time for the Los Angeles Police Department, is one of many reservists called to active duty in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom. U.S. Coast Guard photo.

The Long Blue Line: Coast Guard combat operations in Operation Iraqi Freedom

In Operation Iraqi Freedom, the Coast Guard demonstrated the importance of a naval force experienced in shallow-water operations, maritime interdiction operations, port security and aids to navigation work. The port security units performed their port security duties efficiently in spite of their units being divided between three separate port facilities and two oil terminals. Patrol boats operated for countless hours without maintenance in waters too shallow for Navy assets and served as the Coalition fleet’s workhorses in boarding, escort and force protection duties. OIF was just one of the many combat operations fought by the Coast Guard since 1790 and its heroes are among the many members of the long blue line.


Lt. Cmdr. Matt Walter is one of only 2,738 to have earned the international emergency management credential. U.S. Coast Guard photo.

Coast Guard officer earns emergency management credential

A Coast Guard officer who helped coordinate the response to Hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria has earned an international emergency management credential. Lt. Cmdr. Matthew J. Walter received the Certified Emergency Manager credential from the International Association of Emergency Managers in June 2018.


Nineteen packages of marijuana float near Naval Station Guantanamo Bay after being jettisoned off a small boat in June 2018. U.S. Coast Guard photo.

PSU 309, Coast Guard Cutter Vigilant team up to interdict illegal drugs

Coast Guard service members from Port Security Unit 309 and Coast Guard Cutter Vigilant often conduct missions very different from each other. Despite having different missions, these units often operate jointly with other Coast Guard assets and with international partners. In early June, members from both units collaborated to interdict illegal drugs approximately one mile from Naval Station Guantanamo Bay’s shoreline.


Coast Guard Petty Officer 2nd Class Elizabeth Haworth, auxiliary division member aboard Cutter Northland in Portsmouth, Va., poses for a photo in front of the cutter on Base Portsmouth, May 24, 2018. Haworth received the Coast Guard's MCPO Pearl Faurie Leadership Award at the 2018 Joint Women's Leadership Symposium in San Diego, June 21, 2018, and was recognized for her impactful leadership both on and off the cutter. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Cheryl Dixon.

Honor, Respect, Devotion to Duty: MK2 Elizabeth Haworth

Petty Officer 2nd Class Elizabeth Haworth was recently recognized with the Master Chief Petty Officer Pearl Faurie Inspiration Leadership award at the 2018 Joint Women’s Leadership Symposium in San Diego. Haworth is a leader, a mentor and a teacher. In her spare time, whether at homeport or on port calls, Haworth is an avid volunteer with local communities and president of the unit’s Leadership Diversity Advisory Council.


Fire boat response crews battle the blazing remnants of the off shore oil rig Deepwater Horizon, April 21, 2010. A Coast Guard MH-65C dolphin rescue helicopter and crew document the fire aboard the mobile offshore drilling unit Deepwater Horizon, while searching for survivors April 21. Multiple Coast Guard helicopters, planes and cutters responded to rescue the Deepwater Horizon's 126 person crew. U.S. Coast Guard photo.

The Long Blue Line: local enforcer to global responder—nearly 230 years of Coast Guard evolution!

In 1790, Alexander Hamilton established a small fleet of coastal law enforcement vessels to patrol off East Coast seaports. Over the next 228 years, the service experienced rapid growth in its geographic area of responsibility, mandated missions, and organization through mergers with other maritime services, reorganizations, and transfers from one federal agency to another. These frequent changes demanded remarkable flexibility and resourcefulness of the Coast Guard. The service has lived-up to its motto Semper Paratus by adapting and evolving to meet the nation’s changing needs emerging as a global responder known and respected at home and abroad.


Seaman Kenwyn Berkeley, crew member aboard Coast Guard Cutter Resolute, a 210-foot medium-endurance Reliance class cutter homeported in St. Petersburg, Fla., takes the Oath of Allegiance Friday, June 29, 2018, aboard the cutter to become a citizen during a U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services naturalization ceremony. Berkeley was required to take part in a series of tests and interviews administered by the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services as a part of the naturalization process. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Michael De Nyse.

Coast Guard member becomes a U.S. citizen in St. Petersburg

Seaman Kenwyn Berkeley, crew member aboard Coast Guard Cutter Resolute, a 210-foot medium-endurance Reliance class cutter homeported in St. Petersburg, Florida, took the Oath of Allegiance Friday, July 6, 2018, to become a citizen during a U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services naturalization ceremony.


Honor, Respect, Devotion to Duty: Aidalis Mills

Aidalis Mills has been a civil servant at the 9th Coast Guard District for over 20 years. As the Coast Guard Reserve funds manager for the 9th District, Mills’ job is to execute funding associated with reserve affairs for over 450 reservists across the district. She is also the Hispanic Emphasis program manager, a member of the Leadership and Diversity Advisory Committee, a Defense Finance and Accounting Service committee member and a volunteer within the community. Her selfless service has earned her the 2018 George R. Putnam Inspirational Leadership award. Read more to find out what inspires this inspirational leader.


The Class of 2022 participates in Day One, the start of Swab Summer and the beginning of their 200-week journey to becoming an officer, July 2, 2018. Swab Summer is an intensive seven-week program, that prepares students for military and Academy life. Cadre, second class cadets in-charge of the swabs training, will lead swabs through a series of challenging tasks, events and evolutions. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Nicole Foguth.

Day One

The U.S. Coast Guard Academy renewed a longstanding tradition last week as 279 U.S. cadets and 11 international cadets took part in Day One. Class of 2022 features the largest and most diverse group of international students.


Uranium glass was popular from the 1920s to the early 1950s. It contained between 2 percent and 25 percent of the oxide diuranate form of uranium which was added to glass before it was melted and formed into glassware. It has a distinctive fluorescent yellow color in regular light, but will glow under blacklight. Despite registering on a Geiger Counter, uranium glass was often used as tableware or other household items. U.S. Coast Guard photo.

When Navy Explosive Ordnance Division knows your name…

A curator’s job is not for the faint of heart as Jen Gaudio, Coast Guard Museum curator, can attest to. In her colorful blog, read more about how working at the Coast Guard Museum in New London, Connecticut, has her on a first-name basis with the Navy Explosive Ordnance Division, and how “dangerous” live in the museum can really be.


Vice Adm. Michael McAllister (right), deputy commandant for mission support, and Alan Kaplan, national president of the Navy League, present Petty Officer 1st Class Elizabeth Meister, food services officer, Sector San Francisco, with the Douglas A. Munro Award for Inspirational Leadership, during the 2018 Navy League National Caonvention held in Portland, Ore., June 8, 2018. The Douglas A. Munro Award for inspirational leadership is awarded to the Coast Guard enlisted member who has demonstrated outstanding leadership and professional competence to the extent of their rank and rate. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Levi Read.

Honor, Respect, Devotion to Duty: CSC Elizabeth Meister

Chicago native, Chief Petty Officer Elizabeth Meister, a culinar specialist, is the 2018 winner of the Douglas A. Munro Award. The award, presented once a year, recognizes Coast Guard enlisted members who demonstrate outstanding leadership qualities and professional expertise. Meister’s commitment to others is seen not only in the galley of Sector San Francisco, but with the mentorship and leadership she provides as well as participation with the victim’s advocate and Leadership Diversity Advisory Council.


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