Coast Guardsman performs at World Series

If you watched Game 5 of the World Series, as tens of millions of people did, you’d have spotted a familiar blue uniform at the start of the game.


Lt. Marvin Peña, Health Safety and Work-Life Deputy Regional Practice Manager for the 17th Coast Guard District, reminisces on his childhood, fleeing the war-torn El Salvador and finding citizenship in the United States, Oct. 9, 2018. Peña joined the U.S. Coast Guard as a U.S. resident in 1996, earning citizenship in 2000. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Jon-Paul Rios.

Honor, Respect, Devotion to Duty: Lt. Marvin Peña

Lt. Marvin Peña and his family escaped a life of hardship in El Salvador during a time when civil war raged in South America. He enlisted in the Coast Guard and became a health services technician and worked his way up the ranks from seaman to lieutenant. Today he is the Health Safety and Work-Life Deputy Regional Practice Manager for the 17th Coast Guard District in Alaska and strives to educate his own children of their heritage and instill the same worth ethic he developed from his own parents.


Marker at Arlington National Cemetery honoring Merrill Hoover. Courtesy of Tom Varner.

The Long Blue Line: Merrill Walter Hoover

In the early morning hours of April 10, 1943, Seaman 2nd Class Merrill Walter Hoover sounded the alarm that an oncoming freighter was in the direct path of the CG-72010 he and his shipmates were patrolling aboard in Chincoteague, Virginia. The crew of the freighter, a steamship named Colytto, and CG-72010 made it out alive but Hoover’s body was never recovered. Hoover went in harm’s way and sacrificed his own life to save the lives of his shipmates and was posthumously awarded the DeMolay Medal of Heroism in 2016.


U.S. Coast Guard Petty Officer 1st Class Sean Carrillo, 37, of El Paso, Texas, poses for a photograph, Oct. 7, 2018, approximately 650 north of Barrow, Alaska. Carrillo is a marine science technician stationed aboard the Coast Guard Cutter Healy (WAGB-20) and serves as a liaison between the ship's command cadre and a team of scientists conducting research in the arctic. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Senior Chief Petty Officer NyxoLyno Cangemi.

Out of his native element: El Paso native trades desert sands for Arctic waters

In 2015, Petty Officer 1st Class Sean Carrillo, a marine science technician, stepped off a 420-foot icebreaker and onto the North Pole for the first time. The barren and frigid landscape was vastly different from the desert sands he grew up with more than 4,000 miles away in El Paso, Texas. Due to a bad back, Carrillo deviated from law enforcement to marine science, which eventually led him to join the small community of Arctic blue nose polar bear sailors.


U.S. Coast Guard Petty Officer 3rd Class Shannon Eubanks poses for a photograph, Oct. 3, 2018, about 715 miles north of Barrow, Alaska, in the Arctic. Eubanks is a crew member aboard the Coast Guard Cutter Healy (WAGB-20) and serves on the ice rescue team to protect crew members and scientists conducting work in the Arctic. The Healy is underway in the Arctic with about 100 crew members and 30 scientists to deploy sensors and semi-autonomous submarines to study stratified ocean dynamics and how environmental factors affect the water below the ice surface for the Office of Naval Research. The Healy, which is homeported in Seattle, is one of two ice breakers in U.S. service and is the only military ship dedicated to conducting research in the Arctic. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Senior Chief Petty Officer NyxoLyno Cangemi.

Vermont native takes on the Arctic ice

When Shannon Eubanks graduated high school in Barton, Vermont, she did so surrounded by people she had grown up with for years. Little did she know at the time, she would later surround herself with a similar close-knit group of people on a polar icebreaker in the Arctic Ocean. Each summer, Eubanks deploys in the Arctic with a team of scientists to assist them in conducting scientific research. As a boatswain’s mate aboard the ship, she is in charge of piloting the ship’s small boats, standing watch on the ship’s bridge and supervising a small workforce of enlisted members. With the lives and safety of her fellow shipmates at stake, it’s a responsibility Eubanks doesn’t take lightly.


A neighborhood outside Panama Beach City, Fla., recovers after Hurricane Michael tore through the area in October 2018. Courtesy photo.

Honor, Respect, Devotion to Duty: Lt. j.g. Aaron Black

Lt. j.g. Aaron Black answered the call for help when a shipmate he had only met once asked for help after Hurricane Michael tore through his neighborhood outside Panama City Beach, Florida. Black and other officers from Coast Guard flight school in Pensacola brought tools, fuel, water and food, and helped patch four roofs, cleared debris and damaged trees from the roads and yards. Black and his team’s selfless acts and tireless dedication made a true impact to his shipmate and others in the neighborhood.


Petty Officer 3rd Class Donald Molony assists two survivors from the Empire State Building in New York City after an accidental allusion with a B-52 bomber aircraft. Courtesy photo.

Unsung Coast Guard hero’s daring Empire State Building rescue

Few people today know that on July 28, 1945, a large aircraft crashed into the Empire State Building. Fewer still know that the accident produced the world record for surviving an elevator fall and that the fall’s victim was rescued by a United States Coast Guardsman.


U.S. Coast Guard Academy swabs from the Class of 2022 participate in the 2018 Mystic Flag Ceremony at the Mystic Seaport, Conn., July 28, 2018. During the fourth week of Swab Summer the companies at the Academy, and not on Coast Guard Cutter Eagle, travel to nearby Mystic Seaport, a national maritime museum in Mystic, for a presentation of the class flag to the swabs. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Nicole Foguth.

Honor, Respect, Devotion to Duty: Fourth Class Cadet Bryan Landreth

Coast Guard members live by the core values of Honor, Respect and Devotion to Duty and cadets at the Coast Guard Academy live by the motto “Who lives here, reveres honor, honors duty.” Notice a pattern yet? Honor – a high standard of conduct that can neither be delineated by laws nor defined by regulation. It is this concept that brought Fourth Class Cadet Bryan Landreth to the Academy in which he has pledged to support and defend the Constitution of the United States not once, but twice. Landreth brings his experience from his time in the Coast Guard’s elite Honor Guard and Silent Drill Team to the Academy.


Melvin Bell after his second retirement in 2004. Bell dedicated 66 years of federal service in the military and civil service. Photo courtesy of the Bell family.

The Long Blue Line: Master Chief Petty Officer Melvin Kealoha Bell – minority pioneer, Pacific War hero

On Sept. 9, 2018, Master Chief Melvin Kealoha Bell, retired, crossed the bar at the age of 98. He was a patriot whose distinguished career in service of his country spanned 65 years. During his active-duty career, Bell held many distinctions such as being the first minority master chief petty officer in the Coast Guard and the first master chief in the electronics technician rating. His life, career and work embody the service’s core values of honor, respect and devotion to duty.


Ens. Nikole Barnes and her sailing partner, Lara Dallman-Weiss, sail in Miami. Photo courtesy of Dean Barnes.

Sailing for gold

Ens. Nikole Barnes, Class of 2017, plans to sail her way to gold in the 2020 Olympics in Tokyo. To get there, she has kicked off her three-pronged campaign in order to train with her partner Lara Dallman-Weiss. Barnes hasn’t done this alone, her goals have been supported by the Coast Guard, her coaches, the Coast Guard Academy and the Coast Guard Academy Alumni Association. This marks the first time the Coast Guard has extended orders to an officer to train and compete in the Olympics Games.


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