Seaman Kenwyn Berkeley, crew member aboard Coast Guard Cutter Resolute, a 210-foot medium-endurance Reliance class cutter homeported in St. Petersburg, Fla., takes the Oath of Allegiance Friday, June 29, 2018, aboard the cutter to become a citizen during a U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services naturalization ceremony. Berkeley was required to take part in a series of tests and interviews administered by the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services as a part of the naturalization process. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Michael De Nyse.

Coast Guard member becomes a U.S. citizen in St. Petersburg

Seaman Kenwyn Berkeley, crew member aboard Coast Guard Cutter Resolute, a 210-foot medium-endurance Reliance class cutter homeported in St. Petersburg, Florida, took the Oath of Allegiance Friday, July 6, 2018, to become a citizen during a U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services naturalization ceremony.


Honor, Respect, Devotion to Duty: Aidalis Mills

Aidalis Mills has been a civil servant at the 9th Coast Guard District for over 20 years. As the Coast Guard Reserve funds manager for the 9th District, Mills’ job is to execute funding associated with reserve affairs for over 450 reservists across the district. She is also the Hispanic Emphasis program manager, a member of the Leadership and Diversity Advisory Committee, a Defense Finance and Accounting Service committee member and a volunteer within the community. Her selfless service has earned her the 2018 George R. Putnam Inspirational Leadership award. Read more to find out what inspires this inspirational leader.


The Class of 2022 participates in Day One, the start of Swab Summer and the beginning of their 200-week journey to becoming an officer, July 2, 2018. Swab Summer is an intensive seven-week program, that prepares students for military and Academy life. Cadre, second class cadets in-charge of the swabs training, will lead swabs through a series of challenging tasks, events and evolutions. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Nicole Foguth.

Day One

The U.S. Coast Guard Academy renewed a longstanding tradition last week as 279 U.S. cadets and 11 international cadets took part in Day One. Class of 2022 features the largest and most diverse group of international students.


Uranium glass was popular from the 1920s to the early 1950s. It contained between 2 percent and 25 percent of the oxide diuranate form of uranium which was added to glass before it was melted and formed into glassware. It has a distinctive fluorescent yellow color in regular light, but will glow under blacklight. Despite registering on a Geiger Counter, uranium glass was often used as tableware or other household items. U.S. Coast Guard photo.

When Navy Explosive Ordnance Division knows your name…

A curator’s job is not for the faint of heart as Jen Gaudio, Coast Guard Museum curator, can attest to. In her colorful blog, read more about how working at the Coast Guard Museum in New London, Connecticut, has her on a first-name basis with the Navy Explosive Ordnance Division, and how “dangerous” live in the museum can really be.


Vice Adm. Michael McAllister (right), deputy commandant for mission support, and Alan Kaplan, national president of the Navy League, present Petty Officer 1st Class Elizabeth Meister, food services officer, Sector San Francisco, with the Douglas A. Munro Award for Inspirational Leadership, during the 2018 Navy League National Caonvention held in Portland, Ore., June 8, 2018. The Douglas A. Munro Award for inspirational leadership is awarded to the Coast Guard enlisted member who has demonstrated outstanding leadership and professional competence to the extent of their rank and rate. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Levi Read.

Honor, Respect, Devotion to Duty: CSC Elizabeth Meister

Chicago native, Chief Petty Officer Elizabeth Meister, a culinar specialist, is the 2018 winner of the Douglas A. Munro Award. The award, presented once a year, recognizes Coast Guard enlisted members who demonstrate outstanding leadership qualities and professional expertise. Meister’s commitment to others is seen not only in the galley of Sector San Francisco, but with the mentorship and leadership she provides as well as participation with the victim’s advocate and Leadership Diversity Advisory Council.


The crew of the Coast Guard Cutter Active, a 210-foot medium endurance Reliance-class cutter homeported in Port Angeles, Wash., interdicts more than 1 ton of cocaine from four suspected drug smugglers during a counter-narcotics patrol in the eastern Pacific Ocean, Friday, May 18, 2018. Cutters like Active routinely conduct operations from South America to the Bering Sea to perform defense operations, alien migrant interdiction, domestic fisheries protection, search-and-rescue, counter-narcotics and other Coast Guard missions at great distances from shore keeping threats far from the U.S. mainland. U.S. Coast Guard Photos by Petty Officer 1st Class Michael De Nyse.

Damage control, not damage repair – keeping an aging cutter active

Petty Officer 1st Class Victor Arcelay, a damage controlman and one of the 75 crew members aboard Active, has the daunting task of keeping the 52-year-old Coast Guard Cutter Active, well — active. The Active is currently operating well beyond its 30-year design service life. The Medium Endurance Cutter class is considered the backbone of the Coast Guard’s fleet; however, engineering challenges have plagued the operations of these vessels in recent years.


Petty Officer 1st Class Kevin Spratt, a boatswain's mate stationed on the Coast Guard Cutter SPAR, displays his hammer hook invention in Kodiak, Alaska, April 12, 2018. Spratt combined two tools commonly used by crew members working on a buoy deck, a chain hook and a maul, which allowed for a safer working environment by de-cluttering the buoy deck. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Lauren Dean.

Innovation from a life at sea

The crews aboard buoy tenders like Coast Guard Cutter SPAR, homeported in Kodiak, Alaska, use both sledgehammers and hooks to work on buoys but with so many tools, wouldn’t it make sense to combine? That’s exactly what Petty Officer 1st Class Kevin Spratt that earned him the 2017 Capt. Niels P. Thomsen Innovation Award after coming up with the hammer hook.


A Coast Guard 45-foot Response Boat Medium circles a Coast Guard Auxiliary vessel in preparation for a side-tow demonstration during the Regatta Point Marina Nautical Association Spring Expo. Coast Guard Auxiliarists from the 7th District near Coast Guard Station Cortez routinely work with the active duty Coast Guard for training, demonstrations, and patrols. Coast Guard Auxiliary photo by Patti Kuhn.

Honor, Respect, Devotion to Duty: Coast Guard Auxiliary

Today the Coast Guard Auxiliary celebrates its proud history of outstanding volunteer service on America’s waterways, turning 79 years young…and its members show no signs of slowing down. Auxiliarists have supported Coast Guard missions along our nation’s coasts and inland waters, with emphasis on the promotion of recreational boating safety, since June 23, 1939, when Congress authorized the formation of the Coast Guard’s “Volunteer Reserve.”


Petty Officer 2nd Class Kenneth Minnes and his father, both New Jersey state troopers pose for a photo together. Photo courtesy of Kenneth Minnes.

Off-duty trooper and reservist improvises rescue

A Coast Guard Reserve petty officer was hailed as a hero in early March after saving an accident victim on the Atlantic City Expressway in Gloucester Township, New Jersey. Minnes, a New Jersey state trooper, pulled a man to safety and provided emergency medical assistance to save the man’s life earning him the gratitude of survivor, the governor of New Jersey and the Winslow Fire Department.


Senior Chief Petty Officer Marilyn Dufrat (center), a victim's advocate, shows off her award with her senior reserve officer, Cmdr. Maureen Kallgren.

Victims advocate receives state award

Senior Chief Petty Officer Marilyn Dufrat was awarded the Unsung Hero Award from Attorney General of Virginia Mark Herring at the attorney general’s office in Richmond, Virginia, on April 12, 2018. Dufrat has been the manager of the victim-support program for the last 16 years. Her staff offers information and services to victims and witnesses with the goal of reducing confusion during what can be a complicated, lengthy ordeal.


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