Petty Officer 1st Class Jared Bohler, a marine science technician with Marine Safety Detachment American Samoa, checks lifejacket serviceability aboard the 190-foot U.S.-flagged tuna purse seiner Raffaello during a deficiency check, Oct. 23, 2017. The Raffaello suffered a fire more than two years ago and has been effecting repairs monitored by the MSD personnel. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Chief Petty Officer Sara Muir.

The Coast Guard, 14 degrees south of the equator

The crew of Marine Safety Detachment American Samoa consists of two officers, a first class petty officer, and a GS-12 civilian who conduct about 50 vessel exams consisting mostly of commercial fishing vessels and 25 to 30 investigations varying from pollution to marine causalities annually. While tours are short, around one year, on the island, the crews work to build strong relationships with the communities through boating and safety education as well as participating in community events.


Research, Development, Test and Evaluation Spotlight: Cockpit Laser Strike Protection

Laser strikes are a safety concern for both commercial and military aviation because direct eye strikes can result in temporary flash blindness or eye damage, depending on the strength of the laser. The Coast Guard’s Research and Development Center is working to find options that would provide the necessary eye protection for pilots while still allowing the level of visibility needed for operational awareness and to see the many indicators used during SAR missions – one of those options is a flexible optical filter. Find out more here!


Duck decoys like these help duck hunters attract waterfowl. The Coast Guard encourages all waterfowl hunters to prepare for the worst-case scenario when headed out on the water. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Nate Littlejohn.

Humbled hunter recalls mistakes in the marsh

A duck hunter learns a lesson in preparedness after his boat gets caught in low tides in the marshes on a cold December day without a reliable means of communication or hunting partner.


Members of the Coast Guard Academy, Leadership Development Center, and Officer Candidate School hosted a memorial service in honor of the 11 crewmembers who gave their lives aboard the Coast Guard Cutter Cuyahoga when it sank after colliding with the Argentine coal freighter, Santa Cruz II at the mouth of the Potomac River in 1978, at the Coast Guard Academy in New London, Conn., Oct. 20, 2017. Speaking at the event is Dr. Peter Eident, a survivor of the sinking of the Cuyahoga in 1978. U.S. Coast Guard photos by Petty Officer 2nd Class Lauren Laughlin

Learning from history

From 1968-1980, the U.S. Coast Guard was involved in three major mishaps that had devastating impacts on those who survived. These mishaps also served as the impetus for the Prospective Commanding Officer/Executive Officer Course and the Bridge Resource Management Course, which trains members going back to sea in various leadership roles. Learning from our history in regards to the Coast Guard Cutters Blackthorn, Cuyahoga and White Alder is why the Coast Guard Leadership Development Center runs these courses: to prevent loss of life at sea.


Innovation Program seeks hurricane lessons learned from Coast Guard responders

The Hurricane Lessons Learned challenge on the Coast Guard’s crowdsourcing platform, CG_Ideas@Work, was started as a way to preserve and institutionalize the wealth of lessons learned during hurricane response efforts. All Coast Guard personnel who participated in any of the response efforts are encouraged to share their observations, issues and ideas.


Crew members from Coast Guard Station Golden Gate brace themselves in their 47-foot motor life boat during heavy surf training off the coast of San Francisco. Surf Station Operations require a high level of head protection due to factors like the possibility of moderate impact force, extreme wave/surf heights and minimal warning time. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Barry Lane.

Research, Development, Testing and Evaluation: Boat crew helmets

Helmets are worn by boat crew members to provide head protection during hazardous conditions in various environments. The Coast Guard Research and Development Center has been evaluating personal protective helmets. The center’s extensive research will benefit 16,000 Coast Guard boat crew members throughout the active duty, reserve and auxiliary ranks.


Drifting in the dark

Two Coast Guard members diving off Atlantic Beach, North Carolina, lost their vessel, along with their emergency position indicating radio beacon, marine radio and cell phones. With a flashlight and a filed float plan, the two were safely found and brought to shore after 4 1/2 hours drifting in the water.


The Long Blue Line: The Espionage Act – supporting Coast Guard port security for 100 years

World War I focused public attention on the dangers posed by explosive cargoes to American port cities 100 years ago. The Espionage Act of 1917 became one of the most important legislative acts to empower the Coast Guard in its port security mission. Today, the act continues to support the Coast Guard’s mission to protect ports from sabotage and accidental detonations of dangerous cargoes.


Kayaker shares how she nearly drowned in Cape Cod, Massachusetts

An experienced kayaker shares her story of running into danger while kayaking in Cape Cod, Massachussets. The kayaker learned a valuable lesson that day and hopes that in sharing her story, others learn from her mistakes to always be prepared with the right equipment and to wear a life jacket.


National Safe Boating Week 2017: Wear It!

The North American Safe Boating Campaign has kicked off yet again and in a not so surprising turn of events, the theme remains: Wear It!


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