Olivier Jehl, a French sailor, shows off his EPIRB at Coast Guard Air Station Atlantic City, N.J., Monday, May 16, 2016, after he was rescued by the Coast Guard. Jehl was attempting a solo voyage from New York to the United Kingdom when his 21-foot sailboat struck a submerged object and sank, causing him to use his rescue raft, emergency position-indicating radio beacon and flares. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Chief Petty Officer Nick Ameen/released)

Calling for help: Do you have the right equipment?

Knowing how to reach the Coast Guard in an emergency is an important step in getting help quickly. Make sure you have the right equipment to make a distress call before hitting the water. Some reliable forms of communication include: VHF radio with digital selective calling, an emergency positioning indicating radio beacon and a person locator beacon.


Boat safety training is important for boaters of all experience levels. Statistics show that a greater percent of accidents involving fatalities occurred on boats where the boat operator had received no formal instruction on how to operate the vessel.

Boating Safety Course: Sign up, log on, learn how

Boat safety training is important for boaters of all experience levels. Statistics show that a greater percent of accidents involving fatalities occurred on boats where the boat operator had received no formal instruction on how to operate the vessel.


A Coast Guard petty officer and a civilian pose for a staged photo of someone being arrested for boating under the influence. Alcohol use is the leading contributing factor in boater deaths. Be part of Operation Dry Water by making a pledge to never boat under the influence. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class David R. Marin)

Boat safe, boat sober: Designate a sober skipper

Boating under the influence of alcohol or illegal drugs continues to be the primary contributing factor in fatal boating accidents where the primary cause was known. Alcohol was a contributing factor in 91 boating fatalities and 228 boating injuries in 2015.


Get your free vessel safety check today!

Vessel Safety Checks: Are you in compliance?

Getting a free vessel safety check ensures you are better prepared if something goes wrong while you’re out on the water and could save your life. The free VSC is performed at your boat – whether in a slip, at the launch ramp, or in your driveway – by a certified vessel examiner, at a mutually-convenient time, and usually takes 30 to 45 minutes, depending upon the size of your boat.


2015 Lifejacket statistics

Life jacket wear: Live to love another day

A life jacket buys you time to catch your breath when you fall in the water. It buys you time to try to rescue yourself and get back on your boat or personal watercraft. Wear your life jacket and live to love them another day.


HURRICANE KATRINA

Hurricanes are no joke – prepare yourself, family before it’s too late

Hurricane season officially begins in little more than a week from now, and runs June 1 through November 30. If history has taught us anything about hurricanes, it’s to never underestimate a storm’s power of destruction – take for instance Katrina (2005), Irene (2011) and Sandy (2012), which incurred a combined total of $168 billion in damages. According to the Wall Street Journal, of the top 10 costliest natural disasters in the U.S., eight of them have been hurricanes.


AET2 Dan Grow

100 Years of Coast Guard Aviation: Ready for operations

To celebrate the centennial anniversary of Coast Guard aviation, we share the story of Petty Officer 2nd Class Dan Grow, a flight mechanic currently stationed at U.S. Coast Guard Air Station Houston.


Feature_Prause

The Long Blue Line: Coast Guardsman’s invention of cold-water rescue technique saved over 100 lives during WWII

Coast Guard men and women have long created innovative ways to solve the service’s challenges. Lt. Robert Henry “Bob” Prause, Jr., interests in technology and engineering would prove invaluable during WWII.


Griffons and Pipers and Dolphins, oh my!

Shutter Shootout 2016: Photo of the Year!

After hundreds of thousands of your votes on our Facebook page, we are proud to announce “Wildlife Control” has won Shutter Shootout 2016. “Wildlife Control” features Piper, the wildlife control canine at the Cherry Capital Airport in Traverse City, Mich. Piper keeps the airport clear of pests so aircrews, such as the ones featured in the winning photo from Coast Guard Air Station Traverse City and the Royal Canadian Air Force, can safely transit the area.


Graphic for Coast Guard Shutter Shootout competition

Shutter Shootout 2016: Finals

It’s Dog versus Eagle in this head-to-head 2016 Shutter Shootout championship round! Which will be crowned the winner? We need our fans to decide! Go to the official Coast Guard Facebook page and VOTE!


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