Traveling Inspectors

Traveling inspectors: 100 years of expertise

July 16 marked the 100th anniversary of the traveling inspection staff, originally created under the Steamboat Inspection Service. These travelers are highly experienced marine inspectors and investigators that help to measure the effectiveness of existing programs and policies.


World War II Veteran honored

Honored 69 years later

A much different sort of chaos greeted Coast Guard veteran Edward DiGiovanni on Easter Sunday in April 1945. DiGiovanni, then 18, was aboard the USS LST-884, a tank landing ship operated by his unit, heading toward Japan’s Okinawa Island. Just weeks earlier, DiGiovanni and the ship’s crew had participated in the U.S. invasion of Iwo Jima during the closing months of World War II. DiGiovanni stood at the bottom of the hill as a group of U.S. Marines raised the country s flag atop Mount Surabachi, as depicted in the now-famous photograph.


Caleb Brewster

Caleb Brewster: Revolutionary War hero

Brewster began serving as an officer in the Revenue Cutter Service in 1797, about the time the Quasi-War with France began. By 1801, he received his captain’s commission and began serving as skipper of cutter Active, out of New York. He remained in the service until a year after the end of the War of 1812. All of cutter Active’s missions during the War of 1812 were carried out under his command.


Coast Guard Cutter Elderberry

Lighting the Passage for 60 years

If 60 years of sea duty is a long time, then 60 years of performing aids to navigation maintenance in Southeast Alaska qualifies as an eternity. Imagine working with wind whipping down the straits and narrows, with snow blowing so thick that visibility is more about what you can feel than what you can see. Picture living with the trappings of civilization separated by bays and rivers and mountains and every other obstacle the Last Frontier can muster. Tasked with a mission immeasurably crucial, if humbly unnoticed, to the people who live there, this is the life of the Coast Guard Cutter Elderberry and its crew of eight.


Capt. Robert Smith

‘Too good to be true?’

June 18 marks the 25th anniversary of the College Student Pre-Commissioning Initiative Program. CSPI is a fully funded scholarship program open to students of all races and ethnicities, which may pay up to two academic years of college tuition and books. While in the program, officer trainees are provided with valuable leadership, management, law enforcement, navigation and marine science skills and professional development training. Upon graduation from college, officer trainees attend Officer Candidate School and are commissioned as ensigns in the Coast Guard. In honor of this milestone, we highlight one of the program’s initial candidates, Capt. Robert Smith.


Olivia Hooker recalled her experiences as one of the first African American female members in the Coast Guard SPAR program during World War II. U.S. Coast Guard photo.

A national treasure

On Nov. 23, 1942, legislation approved the implementation of the United States Coast Guard Women’s Reserve. The women who joined were more commonly known as SPARs – an acronym derived from the Coast Guard’s motto, ‘Semper Paratus, Always Ready’ – and formed the foundation for women serving today. On March 9, 1945, Olivia Hooker headed to boot camp. While women had been heading enlisting for months by then, one thing was unique about Hooker – she was one of only five African American females to first enlist in the SPAR program.


Reflecting

‘Nothing less than full victory’

Seventy years ago today 160,000 allied troops put their lives on the line in defense of freedom. Collectively they have been recognized for decades as The Greatest Generation. Today we bring you the stories of four members who would accept “nothing less than full victory.”


jawsofdeath

5 facts you may not know about the Coast Guard at Normandy

When the Allied Forces landed on Normandy Beach, the U.S. Coast Guard took part in the greatest amphibious operation the world had ever seen. On June 6, 1944, the Coast Guard joined the other U.S. military branches and Allied Forces in the operation code-named Overlord. As the world commemorates the 70th anniversary of D-Day, we bring you five facts you may not know about the Coast Guard at Normandy.


Honorary plane

The passing of wings: An ‘ancient’ tradition

Ancient. It’s not normally something you’d want to be called. Unless of course, you are earning the title of a Coast Guard “ancient” – an honor given to a select group of experienced service members. Today, in a change of watch ceremony held at Air Station Traverse City, Mich., retired Vice Adm. John Currier passed the Ancient Albatross designation to Rear Adm. John Korn.


Adm. Paul F. Zukunft departs his change of command ceremony. Zukunft assumed command as the 25th Commandant of the United States Coast Guard. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Patrick Kelley.

Adm. Paul F. Zukunft assumes command of U.S. Coast Guard

Moments ago, Adm. Paul F. Zukunft assumed command of the United States Coast Guard in a change of command ceremony teeming with naval tradition at Douglas A. Munro Coast Guard Headquarters in Washington, D.C. As the 25th Commandant of the Coast Guard, Zukunft will lead the largest component of the Department of Homeland Security, comprised of 41,700 active duty, 7,800 reserve and 8,300 civilian personnel as well as 31,000 volunteer Coast Guard auxiliarists.


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