A 1945 photograph of Cuyahoga in World War II haze gray paint scheme. U.S. Coast Guard photo.

The Long Blue Line: Cuyahoga – gone for 40 years, not forgotten

Coast Guard Cutter Cuyahoga began its career enforcing Prohibition laws and interdicting offshore liquor smugglers in 1926. It career ended as an Officer Candidate School teaching platform after a collision with a 521-foot bulk carrier in Chesapeake Bay in 1978. The Coast Guard will be honoring its fallen shipmates in ceremonies at the Coast Guard Academy in New London, Connecticut, and at Coast Guard Training Center Yorktown, Virginia, Oct. 19-20, 2018 – 40 years after its sinking.


A rigid-hull inflatable small boat from the Coast Guard buoy tender Abbie Burgess speeds out to the site of the survey project. (Courtesy of Mr. Brian R. McMahon)

The Long Blue Line: Minots Ledge Lighthouse – the deadly “Lover’s Light”

On April 17, 1851, the newly constructed lighthouse at Minots Ledge collapsed into the sea surrounding the ledge killing both its lighthouse keepers. Located off the Massachusetts coast south of Boston, the failure of this state-of-the-art lighthouse had been in the making for years. The lighthouse was rebuilt and has withstood every subsequent gale, but the two keepers lost will remain an important chapter in the Coast Guard’s long blue line.


Crew members aboard Coast Guard Cutter Legare honor Signalman First Class Douglas Munro in a ceremony, Sept. 27, 2018. U.S. Coast Guard photo.

Crew of Coast Guard Cutter Legare honors a hero

In the North Atlantic Ocean with sea spray crashing over the bow, and taps playing over a ship’s sound system, the crew of the Legare gathered Thursday, Sept. 27, 2018, to honor the 76th anniversary of Signalman First Class Douglas Munro’s courageous sacrifice.


Petty Officer 3rd Class Donald Molony assists two survivors from the Empire State Building in New York City after an accidental allusion with a B-52 bomber aircraft. Courtesy photo.

Unsung Coast Guard hero’s daring Empire State Building rescue

Few people today know that on July 28, 1945, a large aircraft crashed into the Empire State Building. Fewer still know that the accident produced the world record for surviving an elevator fall and that the fall’s victim was rescued by a United States Coast Guardsman.


Melvin Bell after his second retirement in 2004. Bell dedicated 66 years of federal service in the military and civil service. Photo courtesy of the Bell family.

The Long Blue Line: Master Chief Petty Officer Melvin Kealoha Bell – minority pioneer, Pacific War hero

On Sept. 9, 2018, Master Chief Melvin Kealoha Bell, retired, crossed the bar at the age of 98. He was a patriot whose distinguished career in service of his country spanned 65 years. During his active-duty career, Bell held many distinctions such as being the first minority master chief petty officer in the Coast Guard and the first master chief in the electronics technician rating. His life, career and work embody the service’s core values of honor, respect and devotion to duty.


U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Abbie Burgess sails past the Owl’s Head Lighthouse near Rockland, Maine. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Coast Guard Auxiliarist Bob Trapani.

U.S. Coast Guard ATON personnel honor lighthouse keepers

Crew members from the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Abbie Burgess (WLM-553) and Aids to Navigation Team (ANT) Southwest Harbor, Maine, placed flowers and national ensigns at the gravesites of Abbie Burgess and Isaac Grant, two renowned lighthouse keepers, during a visit to Thomaston, Maine, in August. Burgess was best known for keeping the Matinicus Light shining and later the Whitehead Lighthouse with her husband Grant.


tezanos sketchbook

The Tezanos sketchbook

Coast Guard Art Program artist Robert Selby deployed with Coast Guard Cutter Joseph for two weeks in May 2018. While aboard, Selby executed an artist’s sketchbook in preparation for a painting that will take the work of the Coast Guard at Sector San Juan as its theme.


Pritchard’s Grumman Duck in the icy waters of Greenland before taking flight on his final rescue mission. (U.S. Coast Guard)

The Long Blue Line: Pritchard and Bottoms – Last of the Coast Guard’s MIAs

Like many selfless Coast Guardsmen, Lt. John Pritchard and Petty Officer First Class Benjamin Bottoms, a radioman, went in harm’s way to save lives only to sacrifice their own. During World War II, the Coast Guard ran the Greenland theatre of operations. It was one of the war’s deadliest battlegrounds, where men fought not only the enemy, but the elements as well.


Coast Guard Academy First Class Cadets Marshall Grant, Ali Re, Terry Jung and Third Class Cadet Linda Duncan receive information from Brett Seymore, a member of the National Park Service, before diving in the water near the USS Arizona in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, Aug. 1, 2018.

Tears of the Arizona, a corrosion study

Cadets at the U.S. Coast Guard Academy conduct a long-term corrosion study on the USS Arizona in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, that will help to determine when the submerged hull of the sunken ship might collapse and release oil.


North Arabian Gulf - Coast Guardsmen onboard the U.S. Coast Guard Boutwell chat on the flight deck following refueling operations at sunset March 23, 2003.

The Long Blue Line: PATFORSWA – largest Coast Guard unit outside the US

Naval operations supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom began with the U.S. Navy in the summer of 2002. The Navy drew on its plans for combat operations in Iraq, and in September 2002, U.S. Naval Forces Central Command requested U.S. Coast Guard support for combat operations.


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