Fireman Corin Gilbert, a member of the Coast Guard Cutter Polar Star’s main propulsion division, records machinery readings during a security watch while underway in McMurdo Sound, Antarctica, Jan. 10, 2016. The security watchstander monitors equipment in the icebreaker’s machinery spaces. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Grant DeVuyst.

Deep Freeze 2016: All in a day’s watch (Part 2)

Hopefully you have a better picture of what life is like aboard the Polar Star, and what it takes to operate it. The mission is still just beginning, so continue to check back as we look into the history and purpose of Operation Deep Freeze 2016, the art of icebreaking in Antarctica and many more glimpses into life on the south side of the planet.


The tools of the Coast Guard Cutter Polar Star’s quarter master of the watch sit on the cutter’s chart table while underway in McMurdo Sound, Antarctica, Jan. 9, 2016. The QMOW logs the cutter's movement, working closely with the officer of the deck. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Grant DeVuyst.

Deep Freeze 2016: All in a day’s watch (Part 1)

The Coast Guard Cutter Polar Star doesn’t sleep, not for a second. The cutter and its crew rotate through a daily cycle, like the Antarctic sun looking down on the icebreaker. Always moving, never setting. What’s going on above and below the deck? What does it take to run the nation’s only operational heavy icebreaker? There’s no better way to find out than living it. So join us for two days of 12-hour watch shifts: three four-hour watches from 8 a.m. (0800) to 8 p.m. (2000) each day. Start your coffee brewing; it’s going to be a long couple of days.


Coast Guard Cutter Polar Star supports Operation Deep Freeze 2016

Deep Freeze 2016: Another year, another journey

Every turned page of the calendar shows in the ice-bludgeoned, though sturdy, red hull. It’s not just a 399-foot chunk of metal. If observed correctly, the Polar Star is a book; chock full of the stories of every Coast Guardsman who ever sailed aboard.


The above screenshot shows the display of the virtual aid to navigation established in partnership between the U.S. Coast Guard and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers on the Mississippi River. The virtual aid is significant in that it allows mariners to see a hazard when it is not possible to place a floating aid to mark it. U.S. Coast Guard image.

Coast Guard, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers leverage technology to ensure mariner safety

Across the nation, more than 48,000 Coast Guard aids to navigation, commonly known as ATON, mark every navigable waterway, identifying navigational hazards and ensuring mariner safety. But what happens when navigational aids are knocked off course by a natural disaster like a hurricane or flood?


2015 Videos of the Year: Healy Geotraces Expedition

2015 Videos of the Year: Healy Geotraces expedition

In the eighth video of this year’s top 10 competition, the crew of Coast Guard Cutter Healy embarks on an expedition with the National Science Foundation-funded research program Geotraces in an endeavor to study trace elements in the world’s oceans.


2015 Videos of the Year: Great Lakes Icebreaking partnerships

2015 Videos of the Year: Great Lakes icebreaking partnership

Combined efforts between Coast Guard Cutter Bristol Bay and Canadian Coast Guard Ship Samuel Risley broke ice in the Great Lakes to help a tug and barge travel from Sarnia, Ontario, to Windsor, Ontario, in less than a day. This time lapse is the sixth video nominee in this year’s top 10 competition!


Video of the Year: Turtle rescue

2015 Videos of the Year: Turtle rescue

During a patrol over the summer, the crew of Coast Guard Cutter Stratton thought they were going to find drugs but instead found turtles entangled in fishing gear. What happened next? Watch to find out!


Video of the Year 2015

It’s back…2015 Video of the Year!

Drug busts. Environmental responses. Security patrols. Lives saved. These daily operations, like many performed by the men and women of the U.S. Coast Guard, largely go unseen by members of the public … until now.


The Long Blue Line: Lt. John Pritchard and his World War II rescues

The Long Blue Line: Lt. John Pritchard and his World War II rescues

There are so many Coast Guard men and women whose devotion to duty has put them in harm’s way that it would take a lifetime to write-up each and every story. Like many of these selfless Coast Guardsmen, Lt. John A. Pritchard went in harm’s way to save the lives of others only to sacrifice his own.


Geotraces 2015: Down to a science

Geotraces 2015: Down to a science

As the Arctic region continues to open up to development, the data gathered onboard Healy, as well as the Coast Guard’s ability to maintain access and presence in the Arctic, will become ever more essential to understanding how this part of the world works, and how to most responsibly exercise stewardship over the region.


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