A unique rescue operation saves two sea turtles

Unique rescue operation saves two sea turtles

Protecting living marine resources is one of the 11 statutory missions of the U.S. Coast Guard. While thinking about Coast Guard rescues, many think about the Coast Guard assiting those in distress, but many forget about the Coast Guard’s committment to rescuing those that also live beneath the water’s surface.


Heading south for the winter

Heading south for the winter: The ultimate Polar plunge

Only a small fraction of the world’s population will ever have the opportunity to visit one of the most remote places on earth. Of that small group, an even smaller contingent actually performs their duties below the frozen surface in support of science that has the potential to benefit the entire planet.


Polar Star frees vessel from Antarctic ice

Heading south for winter: 26 people rescued trapped in Antarctic ice

The 157 crewmembers of the Coast Guard Cutter Polar Star departed the U.S. Antarctic Program’s McMurdo Station Feb. 9, 2015 after successfully completing the surface vessel portion of Operation Deep Freeze 2015, which provided military logistical support to the National Science Foundation-managed U.S. Antarctic Program…


ATLANTIC OCEAN - Petty Officer 1st Class Matt Hare hands Chief Petty Officer Brian Smith a lube oil sample as the crew works to remove a failed reduction gear lube oil pump aboard the Coast Guard Cutter Dallas Feb. 7, 2012.  This is the fourth time engineers have had to change the pump on Cutter Dallas' current patrol.  U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Patrick Kelley.

Coast Guard Engineering: A multidisciplinary team dedicated to guarding our homeland through technical expertise

Behind every Coast Guard mission is a dedicated team of engineers charged with keeping our aircraft, cutters, boats, and shore infrastructure both operational and technologically at the cutting edge. Coast Guard engineering as a whole encompasses several engineering disciplines…


Coast Guard

Impacts of a Potential Continuing Resolution or Lapse in Appropriation

Today, United States Coast Guard men and women are standing the watch around the world in service to our Nation. Our efforts and mission success depend on reliable and predictable funding.


Petty Officer 2nd Class John Thompson, a boatswain's mate aboard the Coast Guard Cutter Sequoia, and Dr. Joe Haxel, a research assistant with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, prepare special floats used to deploy a hydrophone in Challenger Deep near the Federated States of Micronesia, Jan. 11, 2015. The crew of the Sequoia and NOAA scientists deployed the hydrophone in an attempt to listen to ambient sound in the deepest part of the Challenger Deep. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Tara Molle.

Listening to the deep

We know more about the surface of the Moon and Mars than we do about the ocean’s seafloor. With water encompassing 63.78 million square miles, the oceans cover 70 percent of the Earth’s surface, with the world’s largest body of water, the Pacific Ocean, covering roughly one third. The Pacific also boasts the deepest trenches, specifically Challenger Deep in the Mariana Trench near the Federated States of Micronesia. Given Challenger Deep’s inhospitable environment, no one has attempted to extensively record ambient sound at its full depth. That is, until now.


Coast Guard manages lava flow

Coast Guard technicians manage lava threat in Hawaii

It’s not every day that a lava flow threatens Coast Guard operations, but crews operating in Hawaii have been battling the complex issues presented by the recent Kilauea Volcano eruption to ensure equipment remains capable and crews remain Semper Paratus.


Cutter Polar Star breaking ice

Headed south for the winter: Icebreaking 101

Simple physics explains the process of icebreaking: two objects cannot occupy the same space at the same time. The 150-person crew of Polar Star uses that principle to open the channel for cargo and fuel ships to deliver vital supplies to the scientists and support personnel at McMurdo Station as part of Operation Deep Freeze.


Operation Deep Freeze

Heading south for the winter: Engineers keep a venerable cutter underway

Without them, the ship goes nowhere. The 93 members of the engineering department aboard Coast Guard Cutter Polar Star are responsible for the propulsion, steering, electrical, sewage, ventilation, firefighting and damage control systems on board the heavy icebreaker supporting the U.S. Antarctic Program through Operation Deep Freeze 2015.


NSF coil spill assistance in Bangladesh

Coast Guard National Strike Force ends 2014 with international oil spill assistance

The U.S. Coast Guard is well known for its ability to handle oil and other hazardous material spills, but what isn’t well known is that the service often works with other countries to assist with their marine pollution incidents. In this case, the spill was in the Eastern Sundarbans Reserved Forest in Bangladesh.


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