Healy strong

Geotraces 2015: Diverse crew supports Arctic mission

With one of the most gender-diverse crews in the Coast Guard, Healy is a showcase of strong, inspiring and high-performing women outgunning expectations and old stereotypes. Healy is a testament that when a talented and diverse crew comes together, nothing, not even 10 feet of solid ice, can stand in their way.


Chief Petty Officer Nathan Mahoney, firefighter James Jeffers and Fire Capt. Chad Davis stand for a photo in front of Training Center Petaluma's Fire Department Engine 9862. U.S. Coast Guard photo.

Honor, Respect, Devotion to Duty: TRACEN Petaluma Fire Dept. Engine 9862

As Coast Guardsmen, we are trained and are always prepared to respond to emergency situations, but it’s rare that we’re called into action to fight what is being described as one of the worst wildland fires in the last 15 years. That is just what Fire Capt. Chad Davis, firefighter James Jeffers and Chief Petty Officer Nathan Mahoney did from July 29-August 5, as they, along with thousands of other firefighters, battled the Rocky Fire in Northern California.


Geotraces 2015

Geotraces 2015: Roaring north with Healy

“The U.S. is an Arctic nation. The Coast Guard has provided presence and access to the Arctic region since the 1860s – the time of Capt. Mike Healy. This ship, which carries his name, continues that proud tradition. This summer we will demonstrate how we continue to provide access to the furthest regions of the globe.”


Remote Rescue

Remote rescues

To say that the North Shore of Alaska is a remote place is an understatement. The North Shore borders the Chukchi Sea and the Beaufort Sea, two marginal seas of the Arctic Ocean. Even in the middle of July, the waters in the area are still icy with large ice flows in many areas. It is not hard to see that conducting search and rescue, one of the Coast Guard’s core missions in the area, presents unusual challenges.


Coast Guard inspection

Honor, Respect, Devotion to Duty: CWO Andrew Schock

A strong leader leads by example and will do the right thing – even when no one is looking.

“Those are two leadership characteristics that I try to exemplify,” said Chief Warrant Officer Andrew Schock, a Coast Guard marine investigator. Schock recently received the Coast Guard Award for Excellence in Marine Inspections for his dedication to the Coast Guard and his team.


225 Years of Service to Nation

225 years of Service to Nation: Marine environmental protection

The U.S. Coast Guard has been the steward of the nation’s maritime environment since the 1820s. This mission dates back to 1822, when Congress tasked the U.S. Revenue Cutter Service with monitoring Federal forest preserves that provided specialized ship timber required for construction of U.S Navy warships.


225 Years of Service to Nation

225 years of Service to Nation: Living marine resources

As the Nation’s environmental and Homeland Security priorities continue to evolve, the Coast Guard’s living marine resources mission will continue to evolve in order to meet shifting demands. Throughout all the changes, however, one thing will remain certain: the Coast Guard will remain ‘Semper Paratus’ to ensure safety, security and stewardship- protecting life, not only at sea, but within the sea as well.


High seas driftnets

High-Seas driftnets: Destroyers of the deep

While every Coast Guard mission makes a difference, some truly leave a legacy. Defending the high seas from the abuses of illegal and indiscriminate fishing has a global impact that ripples far into the future, ensuring stability and sustenance for generations to come.


World Oceans Day 2015

World Oceans Day: Protecting our oceans

From protecting sea turtles and Hawaiian sea monks to safeguarding our Nation’s maritime resources, the Coast Guard stands ready to ensure our the protection of each and every federal waterway and the natural resources therein.


Hurricane Preparedness

Hurricane preparedness: 5 things to keep in mind this season

June 1 marks the beginning of the 2015 Atlantic hurricane season, and while the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration forecasts that we’re only looking at a below-normal hurricane season, that doesn’t mean people shouldn’t remain ready for the unexpected.


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