Honor, Respect, Devotion to Duty: Coast Guard Auxiliary

Written by Coast Guard Auxiliarists Kevin Conquest and Rich Mihalcik

The prow of an auxiliary vessel slices through the calm deep-green waters of the Intracoastal Waterway at the start of a patrol during nautical dawn, July 24, 2015. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Auxiliarist Joseph Giannattasio.

The prow of an auxiliary vessel slices through the calm deep-green waters of the Intracoastal Waterway at the start of a patrol during nautical dawn, July 24, 2015. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Auxiliarist Joseph Giannattasio.

Today the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary celebrates 78 years of continuous volunteer service on America’s waterways.

On June 23, 1939, the Coast Guard “Reserve” was born from an act of Congress authorizing civilians to work for the Coast Guard promoting boating safety, both on the high seas and inland waters. Congress then amended its decision further with the passage of the Auxiliary and Reserve Act of 1941. It was at that point the Reserve became an official military branch while the Auxiliary, as we
know it today, was ratified under Title 14, chapter 23 of the United States Code.

At the request of Auxiliarist Dave Porter, Lt. Cmdr. Andy Frye demonstrates a proper salute to auxiliarists before they take their posts aboard Coast Guard Cutter Campbell during Fleet Week 2014 in New York City, Nov. 11, 2014.  U.S. Coast Guard photo by Auxiliarist James Chin.

At the request of Auxiliarist Dave Porter, Lt. Cmdr. Andy Frye demonstrates a proper salute to auxiliarists before they take their posts aboard Coast Guard Cutter Campbell during Fleet Week 2014 in New York City, Nov. 11, 2014. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Auxiliarist James Chin.

Coast Guard Auxiliarists today provide an invaluable service to team Coast Guard in a wide variety of missions. Our primary mission is recreational boating safety as exemplified by Auxiliarists around the country utilizing their personally owned, authorized facilities to conduct safety patrols. These patrols often turn into search and rescue missions where our Auxiliary has assisted over 5,000 people in 2016 alone. These types of missions are not just surface-based; the Coast Guard Auxiliary also conducts air operations.

Additional services provided to the public include: free Vessel Safety Checks, public education in the form of boating safety classes, marine dealer visits, and public outreach at boat shows.

Coast Guard Auxiliary color guards present the colors at the commissioning ceremony of Auxiliary Training Center Marcus Hook in Marcus Hook, Penn.,  May 2, 2013. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Auxiliarist David Lau.

Coast Guard Auxiliary color guards present the colors at the commissioning ceremony of Auxiliary Training Center Marcus Hook in Marcus Hook, Penn., May 2, 2013. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Auxiliarist David Lau.

Auxiliary members are further authorized to assist any Coast Guard mission not involving direct military or law enforcement action. These missions include providing culinary specialists to prepare meals on Coast Guard bases and cutters, radio watchstanders, language interpreters, media outreach, and administrative support of all types. Newer Auxiliary programs in 2017 where Auxiliarists will assist the active duty and Reserves include Coast Guard clergy support, financial education about the Blended Retirement System, help in monitoring Coast Guard shore construction projects, musical support for Coast Guard ceremonies, and cyber security support.

These volunteer members of our team exemplify Coast Guard Core Values of Honor, Respect, and Devotion to Duty.

Thank you, Coast Guard Auxiliary, for always being Semper Paratus! Happy birthday!

Comments

comments

Tags: