Coast Guard rescues Iranian mariners in Persian Gulf

An Iranian mariner greets a U.S. Coast Guardsmen, assigned to U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Monomoy. Monomoy rendered assistance to six Iranian mariners, who had to abandon their dhow, Ya-Hussayn, after its engine room flooded. U.S. Navy photo by U.S. Fifth Fleet Public Affairs, US Naval Forces Central Command.

An Iranian mariner greets a U.S. Coast Guardsmen, assigned to U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Monomoy. Monomoy rendered assistance to six Iranian mariners, who had to abandon their dhow, Ya-Hussayn, after its engine room flooded. U.S. Navy photo by U.S. Fifth Fleet Public Affairs, US Naval Forces Central Command.

With contributions by U.S. Fifth Fleet Public Affairs, US Naval Forces Central Command.

The Coast Guard Cutter Monomoy, assigned to Commander, Task Force 55, rendered aid to six Iranian mariners who were aboard a distressed vessel in the North Arabian Gulf Tuesday.

At approximately 3 a.m. local time, Monomoy was operating in the area when it was hailed by flares and flashlights from the Iranian cargo dhow, Ya-Hussayn. The dhow’s master requested assistance from Monomoy indicating the engine room was flooding and deemed not seaworthy.

Monomoy immediately launched their small boat and approached the Ya-Hussayn. Two persons were rescued from the vessel and four from a life raft tied off to the dhow’s stern.

The six Iranian mariners were transferred to Monomoy and were provided water, blankets and halal meals. Halal meals are in accordance with Islamic law and are stored aboard U.S. Coast Guard ships to provide to Muslim mariners in distress.

An emergency medical technician from Monomoy treated an injured Ya-Hussayn crew member. Fortunately, his injuries were not serious and there was no requirement for him to be medically evacuated.

Monomoy immediately launched their small boat and approached the Ya-Hussayn.  Two persons were rescued from the vessel and four from a life raft tied off to the dhow’s stern. U.S. Navy photo by U.S. Fifth Fleet Public Affairs, US Naval Forces Central Command.

Monomoy immediately launched their small boat and approached the Ya-Hussayn. Two persons were rescued from the vessel and four from a life raft tied off to the dhow’s stern. U.S. Navy photo by U.S. Fifth Fleet Public Affairs, US Naval Forces Central Command.

Petty Officer 2nd Class Emily Poole, Monomoy’s medic, expressed her sentiments about assisting mariners at sea. “Saving lives is the last thing you expect to do at 0300 while patrolling in the Northern Arabian Gulf, but being in the Coast Guard, that’s what we are trained to do.”

A civilian interpreter aboard Monomoy provided the initial contact with the Iranian Rescue Coordination Center to report the status of the Ya-Hussayn and coordinate the transfer of the Iranian mariners from Monomoy to shore. Civilian interpreters are routinely embarked on Coast Guard cutters operating within the Arabian Gulf.

The master of the Iranian vessel, who also spoke with the rescue coordination center, was appreciative for the assistance to his crew and grateful for the efforts to get them home.

Hakim Hamid-Awi, the owner of the Ya-Hassan stated, “Without your help, we were dead. Thank you for all that you did for us.” The Iranian mariners wished the best for the captain and crew.

Later in the day, the six mariners were transferred by smallboat from Monomoy to the Iranian Coast Guard vessel Naji 7.

The captain of the Naji 7, via translator, said, “Sends his regards and thanks to our Captain and all crewmembers for assisting, and taking care of the Iranian sailors. Wishes us the best, and thanks us for our cooperation.”

U.S. Navy Capt. Edward Cashman, Commander of Task Force 55, commended Monomoy’s actions. “Monomoy displayed exceptional skill and professionalism during the night time rescue at sea. Monomoy’s presence in the Northern Gulf and the effective coordination of the rescue proves again the value of Coalition Maritime Security Operations.”

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  • Mhm

    Nice job! For a small service, the Coast Guard looks like they are everywhere.

  • Guillottep

    what is the US Coast Guard doing in the Persian Gulf???

  • SKIP

    REALLY ? the USCG stocks halal meals aboard ship in case they rescue Muslim sailors…. I wonder if the Iranian CG stocks a BLT with mayo or a nice chili dog with onions in case I get stranded……..my tax dollars at work

  • Anonymous

    One has to ask why the USCG is even over there. I realize that the CG leadership wants a seat at the table and not be left out but when CG resources are stretched thin here it makes no sense to further wear out already aging ships. Additionally, we have to provide them with special food? Like if the sitiuation was reversed they would cater to American culinary preferences? I doubt it……..

  • LT S. M. Young

    Some good questions asked by our commenters.

     

    The Coast Guard has a presence in the Persian Gulf with
    Patrol Forces Southwest Asia, or PATFORSWA. PATFORSWA provides U.S. Navy Fifth
    Fleet with combat ready assets, access to foreign territorial seas and ports
    and unique expertise and flexibility.

     

    There are six 110-foot patrol boats in the Persian Gulf and
    they are still actively involved in oil platform protection; although, much of
    the mission has shifted to train other countries naval forces and build lasting
    relationships.

     

    The Coast Guard forces in the region also conducted
    professional exchanges, exercises and combined operations with numerous partner
    countries in the region. Each of these elements supports the combatant
    commander by providing unique capabilities to supplement the Fifth Fleet’s
    operations.

    You can find out more information about PATFORSWA be checking out their webpage:

    Very Respectfully,
    Lt. Stephanie Young
    Coast Guard Public Affairs

  • Anonymous

    Lt. Young…I thank you for your reply but it does not really answer my and others questions about a USCG presence in the Gulf. Frankly, I think the money would be better spent returning the icebreakers Polar Star and Polar Sea to sea duty as assets along with the Healy for Arctic missions which are becoming more and more important to the US rather than patrolling the Gulf.

  • Steve Riggs

    The Coast Guard works internationally for many valid reasons.  One is to assist the Navy with boardings. One is because they are excellent in smaller ship or boat situations and littoral warfare as well as search and rescue.  I guess you didn’t the know that Coast Guard personnel were utilized heavily in the D-Day landings either?  One of my favorite old photographs is taken on Iwo Jima of several scrappy battle worn Marines holding a bullett riddled sign- “Thanks to Coast Guard for bringing us here”

  • Anonymous

    Their job.

  • Anonymous

    I was deployed to Bosnia in 94; believe me when I say that the Navy had no idea what they were doing when they boarded vessels.  The Navy boarding officer, an LT bragged that he had almost 20 boardings under his belt.  We politely informed him that between our 4 man Coastie team, we had in the high hundreds to a 1000 boardings.  It has gotten better since then, but the Coasties are the experts and pick up on things that will slip by the Navy boarding teams.

  • John

    They’re probably MRE-style “humanitarian” rations, which all US forces carry to manage refugees from different faiths (no animal products – yum!)
      

  • Boonesunrise

    The same thing my dad was doing in the North Atlantic in WWII and I was doing in the 60′s — being part of the US military!

  • Hh65flier

    Yep…also a LEDET guy, and I agree.  Two visits to the Red Sea and Persian Gulf in 1992.  Coast Guardsmen have a much better idea how to spot hidden compartments, assess safety, interpret manifests, and verify accounts of the people being boarded.
     

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_UBLXH275JJTCYOFL77L2G4ZUC4 f_cal

    I’m in the CG and spent 7 months in the Northern Arabian Gulf. Why was I there? Little things like protecting an oil platform and protecting our troops and our equipment from all over centcom.

  • Rsantosafan

    Different funds. Not CG money.

  • Rsantosafan

    They will stock a beef chili dog with onions or a beef bacon, lettuce, tomatoes with mayo. No pork though.

  • Kate

    Getting Russian oil to Alaska and now 2 rescues in the Persian Gulf. How do you determine which mssions you take on?

  • Anonymous

    The Coast Guard never gets enough credit. Props to all.

  • kevin

    its not arabian gulf..its persian….its been called persian and will be ….i dont know why do we call the gulf of Mexico, the Gulf of Mexico  and not gulf of usa….you know what i mean..? its the same concept……..

  • http://twitter.com/DistinctlyFL Julie Newton Sloane

    Showing respect for the religious needs of others is just on more way of reinforcing the difference between how we (the US) are protrayed and how we really are. Having Halal meals available is necessary as I imagine there are Muslim Coasties, just as there are probably vegan meals or meals for people with food allergies. Propaganda only works if you can completely control all information streams. (I’ve heard that Iran is trying to do this by jamming Al-Jazeera.) The internet, and blogs like the Coast Guard Compass, are one of our best tools for a safer, more democratic world.

  • SKIP

    Then return the CG to the DOD and get them out of DHS. If they are a branch of the military, they don’t belong in the political world of DHS…then they can do their job

  • Boats76

    You don’t. The mission is there and you have to find a way to make it happen.

  • Guest

    Persian Gulf please, not Arabian! 

  • Guest

    Ms. Young,
    I am not sure which history book you have studied refers to the Persian Gulf as the Arabian Gulf.  I am sure, however, that if you go back to them, you will notice that not a single one does.

  • TechNein

    American servicemembers that are Muslim are offered Halal meals as well. The fleet is based in Southeast Asia. There are over 200 million Muslims in Southeast Asia. Halal food is a central facet to Islamic beliefs. It’s a no-brainer, really.

  • Mwillpvax

    They seem to do their job just fine as is.  You probably don’t understand what their job is.  Educate yourself.

  • mark

    Its not about what they do, its about what we do as Americans. 

  • Nomad

    Gulf or Arabian Gulf = same body water! If you live or have been there (I have; under constant threat of Iranian Silkworm missiles, by the way), you can call it whatever you prefer based on your perspective. Odd that many prefer Persian Gulf which supports the Iranian claim of dominance (“Persia” = Iran). Do you also support a new Persian Empire that involves the potential Iranian invasion, acquisition and alliance of neighboring territories and countries?! I do NOT! :(

  • Coastie

    The US Govt calls the body of water the Arabian Gulf to slight Iran.  Strictly political.

  • Coastie

    Would you be offended if I were to serve you a bowl of pasta and some marinara sauce?  That’s a halal meal.  I don’t think they put a full goat killed in a certain manner on a rotesserie to serve to the rescued mariners.  Again, educate yourself.

  • Coastie

    Would you rather have a cracker that was baked 24 months ago or a chicken breast that was cooked 24 months ago?  Maybe that veggie only meal sounds a lot better now!  I wouldn’t touch either one if I didn’t have to!  HA!

  • Coastie

    The Navy is paying for the CG to assist them in the region.  Once the Navy quits funding the CG asset, the CG will pack up and leave.

  • Guest

    Answer may be found here if you take the time to read:

  • SKIP

    when I get emails from family members serving over there and from co-workers whose children are serving over there and they can’t get basic needs from their own country, I will be DAMNED if I am going to cater and pay for careless Iranian boaters….to put it nicely

  • SKIP

    when I get emails from family members serving over there and from co-workers whose children are serving over there and they can’t get basic needs from their own country, I will be DAMNED if I am going to cater and pay for careless Iranian boaters….to put it nicely

  • SKIP

    when I get emails from family members serving over there and from co-workers whose children are serving over there and they can’t get basic needs from their own country, I will be DAMNED if I am going to cater and pay for careless Iranian boaters….to put it nicely

  • SKIP

    let’s see…. passed around from Dept of Interior, Dept of Treasury, the Navy, the DOD and now Dept of Homeland Security….like the last kid picked on the plyground

  • SKIP

    let’s see…. passed around from Dept of Interior, Dept of Treasury, the Navy, the DOD and now Dept of Homeland Security….like the last kid picked on the plyground

  • SKIP

    let’s see…. passed around from Dept of Interior, Dept of Treasury, the Navy, the DOD and now Dept of Homeland Security….like the last kid picked on the plyground

  • SaltyDog86

    The Coast Guard is the only branch of service with law enforcement authority, and the ability to board any vessel regardless of nationality without an SNO (Statement of No Objection), therefore making the enforcement process for the Navy much easier. Although we are part of DHS, we definitely could use a DoD budget…. those RB-Ms, FRC, and NSCs cant come out fast enough…. =[

  • Coastie

    Then I think their commands need to be reprimanded.  They shouldn’t be complaining to their mothers and fathers.  They should be talking to their supervisors.  I’d be hard pressed to say that most of our military isn’t getting what they need over there, but there will always be some exceptions.

    I only did 13 months there.

  • Coastie

    Why so much hate?

  • http://www.facebook.com/russell.barboza Russell Barboza

    thats  cool steven  gee it seems when u were on the  monomy u were always  busy from egypt air crash  john kennedy  tug boat escorting  tall ships  got vessell with tons of drugs it was non stop you were on news few times!  must  miss that  cutter. very proud mom xx

  • http://www.facebook.com/russell.barboza Russell Barboza

    my son steven romano

  • SKIP

    NOT hate !  with all due respect, I choose the term as CANDOR. The quality of being frank, open and sincere in speech or expression. I appreciate your views, opinions and candor too !  I thank you for your CG service…..BRAVO ZULU !

  • Trader2069

    The first Persian Empire (Achaeminid) was a major force in shaping the region some 2500+ years ago. Most Iranians don’t like their current government and view it as a “second Arab invasion,” if anything. They do, however, have great pride in their past. Ironically, the naming dispute arose during Pan-Arabism (1960s) during which time Iran supported Israel, especially when all the Arab countries refused to conduct any trade with them.

    The point of all this is that although the Coast Guard did a very selfless and commendable act, it’s best to stay out of the region’s indigenous issues.

  • Woody

    Great Chatter here. I am a Coastie Vietnam Vet. I served aboard the CGC Chase for Operation Market Time 1969-70. I juat wanted to say (for all of you that question what the CG is doing in the Presian Gulf and elsewhere) that the US Coast Guard is the hard nucleus of seagoing professionals around which the Navy forms in times of war.
    Educate yourself by reading Paul Scotti’s book “Coast Guard Action In Vietnam: Stories of Those Who Served”. It is a great overview of the many, many jobs the CG does in time of war. Semper Paratus, Always Ready.

  • John Epperly

    God Bless these fine Americans for doing a great job in a dangerous place, so far from home.  Well Done Coast Guard!!

  • KTCGVET

    If USCG is in DOD no one else is authorized to enforce US laws at sea. Further, the origin of the USCG was with the Dept of Treasury until the 1960′s when transferred to the Transportation Dept; then to Homeland Security after 9/11. Never in DOD.  However, it was in War Department (now DOD) in WW2, possibly WW1. Also their job is law enforcement as no one else can do; saving lives and national defense as needed. Join us and help!

  • KTCGVET

    If USCG is in DOD no one else is authorized to enforce US laws at sea. Further, the origin of the USCG was with the Dept of Treasury until the 1960′s when transferred to the Transportation Dept; then to Homeland Security after 9/11. Never in DOD.  However, it was in War Department (now DOD) in WW2, possibly WW1. Also their job is law enforcement as no one else can do; saving lives and national defense as needed. Join us and help!

  • Bobbycv64

    I was USN, you guys rock, trust me USN loves USCG.  You also have a great sense of humor, go here:

    JUST A JOKE

  • Map2legend

    The UN Law of the Sea Treaty recognizes 12-mile territorial limit for the 7 Arab countries bordering the gulf. They call it “Arabian Gulf,” so the part of the gulf that is theirs is legally the “Arabian Gulf” under international law. History does not matter, and the Iranian point of view does not over rule international law.