From the deck plate of the Bertholf: Alaska Patrol

A small boat crew from the Coast Guard Cutter Bertholf launches from the stern of the cutter to assist with a boarding in the Bering Sea. The cutter Bertholf has two small boats the crew is able to use during law enforcement operations and maritime emergencies, one from the side of the cutter and the other from the stern. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Jonathan Lally.

A small boat crew from the Coast Guard Cutter Bertholf launches from the stern of the cutter to assist with a boarding in the Bering Sea. The cutter Bertholf has two small boats the crew is able to use during law enforcement operations and maritime emergencies, one from the side of the cutter and the other from the stern. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Jonathan Lally.

As the newest Coast Guard cutters, every mission undertaken by a national security cutter is an opportunity to showcase its capabilities that will transform the way the service performs its missions in the 21st century.

Last week, Coast Guard Compass introduced you to a new series following one NSC on its first patrol off the coast of Alaska. “From the bridge of the Bertholf” takes you inside the wardroom of Coast Guard Cutter Bertholf to get a command perspective on the missions and capabilities of this new asset in one of the most challenging operating environments in the world.

But, what about the men and women who drive the small boats, direct aircraft from the flight deck and keep the engines running? Coast Guard Alaska has your answers. “From the deck plate of the Bertholf” is an insider’s look at life of the crew assigned to Bertholf as they run the cutter through its paces conducting Coast Guard missions in the Bering Sea.

Click here to read Coast Guard Alaska’s first “deck plate” post where we meet Petty Officer 2nd Class Joseph Gonzales as he shares the story of being the coxswain on Bertholf’s first-ever boarding in Alaskan waters.

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  • Lt.

    How can this new Ship have so much RUST? It’s brand new

  • MK

    I’m guessing because it is more opened to the sea for the small boats to come on in. Location and salt water have alot to do with the rate things rust. I a like seeing the guys chip and paint away.. I like this setup and love the ship, cool.