Coast Guard launches first fast response cutter

Earlier today, the first of the Coast Guard’s fast response cutters, Coast Guard Cutter Bernard C. Webber, entered the water  and now sits pier-side in Lockport, La.

The initial entry of the new cutter into water marks the beginning of its journey towards operating in support of vital missions throughout the Caribbean Sea and Gulf of Mexico, including port, waterways and coastal security, fishery patrols, search and rescue and national defense.

It took a total of three days to get the 154-foot Bernard C. Webber from the fabrication shop to the water. You can see the process play out in the photos below.

To keep up on the latest news on Coast Guard Cutter Bernard C. Webber click here. To learn more about the first 14 heroes the Sentinel-class Fast Response Cutters have been named for, click here.

The total evolution to move Coast Guard Cutter Bernard C. Webber took three days.  Here, Webber is shown exiting the fabrication shop on the way to the pier where the launch will occur. U.S. Coast Guard photo.

The total evolution to move Coast Guard Cutter Bernard C. Webber took three days. Here, Webber is shown on day one, exiting the fabrication shop on the way to the pier where the launch will occur. U.S. Coast Guard photo.

On day 2 of 3, Coast Guard Cutter Bernard C.  Webber was towed across Highway 308 in Lockport, La to the pier. U.S. Coast Guard photo.

On day two of three, Coast Guard Cutter Bernard C. Webber was towed across Highway 308 in Lockport, La to the pier. U.S. Coast Guard photo.

Coast Guard Cutter Bernard C. Webber arrives pierside and prepares to be attached to the crane. U.S. Coast Guard photo.

Coast Guard Cutter Bernard C. Webber arrives pierside and prepares to be attached to the crane. U.S. Coast Guard photo.

After careful coordination and preparation of the rigging, Coast Guard Cutter Bernard C. Webber is aloft. U.S. Coast Guard photo.

After careful coordination and preparation of the rigging, Coast Guard Cutter Bernard C. Webber is aloft. U.S. Coast Guard photo.

Coast Guard Cutter Bernard C. Webber settles into the water with the rigging attached.  For the first part of the launch the cutter was kept rigged while the an inspection took place.  If everything is satisfactory, the rigging is detached. U.S. Coast Guard photo.

Coast Guard Cutter Bernard C. Webber settles into the water with the rigging attached. For the first part of the launch the cutter was kept rigged while the an inspection took place. If everything is satisfactory, the rigging is detached. U.S. Coast Guard photo.

The lead Sentinel-class Fast Response Cutter, the Bernard C. Webber, enters the water for the first time on April 21, 2011. U.S. Coast Guard photo.

The lead Sentinel-class Fast Response Cutter, the Bernard C. Webber, enters the water for the first time on April 21, 2011. U.S. Coast Guard photo.

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  • Guest

    I thought it wasnt a Cutter until after it is commissioned?

  • http://www.facebook.com/bob.brayman Bob Brayman

    just plain cool. sweet lines and that high bow.

  • BILL K.

    Will work for fun… Ret Mkcm ..

  • Mark LeVeck

    Hate to see the old ones go, but seeing new ones like this hit the water makes me want to pack a seabag again …

  • SchwenCPB

    Thanks Bob! Good to hear from you. Mark S.

  • Anonymous

    God bless the US Coast Guard…

  • Christopher Lagan

    Guest,

    Your question is an interesting one. When does a Coast Guard cutter become a cutter?

    We asked around today and found that for every person you ask, you get a slightly different answer based on their own interpretation of Coast Guard traditions.

    According to the Coast Guard Historian’s website, “The commissioning ceremony completes the cycle from christening and launching to full status as a cutter in the United States Coast Guard.” ()

    In the end, its hard to look at the beautiful lines of the vessel pictured above and think of it as anything other than Coast Guard Cutter Bernard C. Webber even though we have a little longer to wait for the christening and commissioning ceremonies to take place and for CGC Webber to take its rightful place in the fleet.

    Respectfully,
    Christopher Lagan
    United States Coast Guard
    Public Affairs

  • Surfman

    Best lookin USCG Cutter I have seen in a long time, they have blended the 36, the 44 and the 52 foot Motor Life Boat character and spirit of the Surfmen into a 154 foot US Coast Guard Cutter.
    All the boys are smiling from above!

  • Puddlepiratetooo

    Now that’s a good looking vessel……..about time the Coast Guard got someone to design something that doesn’t look like it morphed in a bad dream !

    I hope shes fast and a credit to the crews who man her !

    Jerry Brown BMC Ret.

  • cutterman 378

    nice lookin cutter, bet shes fast and breaks water easy~~~~

  • Booskibear

    This is a very nice looking Cutter!!! I love my Coasties… and Thank you to all who serve or have served in our U.S. Coast Guard… You are all just awesome! Stay safe!

    The proud wife of CWO Hibdon…….!!!

  • Angiebangie2008

    This is fantastic I’m in live with this cutter! A beautiful ship

  • DAllen

    Thank you for looking into to that. We have so few traditions left that people lose sight of some of them.

  • Kate

    This is very exciting for the men and woman of the United Coast Guard. My son is a Coastie and he is hoping to get on one of the new Cutters. Very proud of my son and the other men and woman of the United States Coast Guard. Stay safe.

    Proud Mom of E. Kelley ET3

  • Kate

    This is very exciting for the men and woman of the United Coast Guard. My son is a Coastie and he is hoping to get on one of the new Cutters. Very proud of my son and the other men and woman of the United States Coast Guard. Stay safe.

    Proud Mom of E. Kelley ET3

  • http://www.facebook.com/ReneHarris123 Rene Martin Harris

    I was an engineer on 36′, and 44′ MLBs in the north Pacific ocean of Oregon. Those were nice. One of these we could have stayed out for days. I want one for myself.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Bob-Spangler/100000989230197 Bob Spangler

    SEMPER PARATUS !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1311173587 Robert Reppert

    Very purrty cutter there! Any word on its speed and armament?

  • Christopher Lagan

    Robert,

    You can read more about the features of the Fast Response Cutters here: .

    Respectfully,
    Christopher Lagan
    United States Coast Guard
    Public Affairs

  • Rick B

    Beautiful lines, the crew that is lucky enough to be aboard should be honored.

  • Richard

    My son is a Coastie, as was my father, two cousins and an uncle. I am so very glad to see that such a great service is receiving needed modern equipment. We have to see to it in these troubled economic times that the re-building of the fleet goes on. That’s our duty to the men and women of the USCG.

  • Pat S.

    Now, let’s head to the “bar! “

  • Hugh

    Hope to see some of these up in Astoria!

  • Coastie Dad

    My son is a Coastie as well, and a member of the Bernard C. Webber’s crew. Beautiful new Cutter!

  • Cathy

    Thanks to all the men (and women?) who worked on the Bernard C. Webber. Not all the people who defend us are Heroes; those who build our boats to defend our country and help devastated countries–those who work at home–are heroes in my eyes.

  • Matt

    That thing is sweet!! Good luck drug runners ;)

  • T.S. Torrence

    I saw her hanging from the slings at the yard as I passed the other day. I wasn’t even aware she was being built. I retired a BMCM and served 10 yrs. on 82′s and 4 yrs. on a 255, she looks like she got a lot of lines from both. Kind of reminds me of the old 125′s.

  • CJ

    The best looking cutter of the fleet.

  • Patrick

    That hull looks like it’s made for crashing! This is an amazing addition to the CG fleet, and I am happy to see it in the water.

    Awesome.

  • LT Jerry Lentz (retired)

    That baby looks it could ride out “The Perfect Storm” and do it looking like a billionaire’s expedition yacht. A REAL boat for REAL sailors, a very fitting vessel for the most elite sea-going service on the planet.

  • Reb

    Someone asked what constitutes a cutter. My recollection is that a cutter is any ship at least 60 feet long — among other things. Recruits who volunteered to serve on a Coast Guard cutter used to end up mowing the grass.

  • Henry

    What a beauty. Please tell me the CG won’t mess it up by putting a 50 ft antenna tower on it like they did to the 110′s

  • Eric

    Very nice! Just curious though, how come there’s no traditional “U.S. Coast Guard” lettering on the side?

  • Christopher Lagan

    Eric,

    Thanks for the question.

    There are still several stages in the building and acceptance process, including sea trials and a formal christening, before the hull number and “U.S. Coast Guard” are affixed to the vessel and it enters into active service as a Coast Guard unit.

    Stay tuned to Coast Guard Compass for more updates on Webber and the rest of the fast response cutters!

    Respectfully,
    Christopher Lagan
    United States Coast Guard
    Public Affairs

  • Nick Chaleunphone

    I think the FRC almost looks like Armidale class patrol boat that the Royal Australian Navy has.

  • BMCM Ted (ret)

    Great looking Ship, glad to see them moving forward, Bollinger continues to build some great products for the Coast Guard, great to see our shipmates still at the yards ensuring we get a a-1 product, thanks Allen and Mark

  • BM Sammy Weeks (ret)

    Dick Bollinger’s crew can build some of the finest boats around. I am a Plankowner of the USCGC WRANGELL 1332. it was built in lockport la.
    Its time the US Coast Guard got new equipment.

  • John Alger

    Nice lines – vaguely similar to WWII British DD’s. Our son is an FS1 currently in IL so don’t know if he will ever be able to get on one of these.

    CDR USN(ret)