The Coast Guard Electronic Charts Team receives the Award for Excellence from Department of Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen M. Nielsen at the DHS annual awards ceremony in Washington, D.C., Nov. 7, 2018. (From the left) Secretary Nielsen, Lt. Cmdr. Matthew Walter, Mike Sollosi, Courtney Mallon, Stephen Jones, Douglas Scheffler and Acting Deputy Department of Homeland Security Secretary Claire M. Grady display the DHS Award for Excellence. Department of Homeland Security photo by Tim Godbee.

Honor, Respect, Devotion to Duty: Electronic Charts Team

Congratulations to the U.S. Coast Guard’s Electronic Charts Team for your accomplishments and earning the DHS Award for Excellence! The team is part of the service’s efforts to make American waterways safer, more efficient and more resilient by helping the Coast Guard make a decision that allows mariners to meet legal obligations without paper charts. This decision is estimated to save the maritime industry more than 450,000 hours and $30.5 million a year over 10 years.


The Coast Guard Cutter Dependable underway in the Eastern Pacific Ocean on patrol. The Cutter Dependable's crew returned to their homeport, Virginia Beach, Va., after a two-month patrol of the Eastern Pacific Ocean May 4, 2017. During this patrol, the crew seized over 8,000 pounds of cocaine with an estimated value of $122 million which will be used as evidence to prosecute 19 suspected smugglers. U.S. Coast Guard photo courtesy of Coast Guard Cutter Dependable.

The Long Blue Line: Cutter Dependable—50 Years of “Credibility Built on Excellence”

Today marks the golden anniversary of the Coast Guard Cutter Dependable’s service in the Coast Guard. Over its distinguished 50 years of service, the cutter and its crews have earned countless honors and awards for law enforcement, living marine resources, search and rescue and humanitarian missions they have conducted.


Research, Development, Test and Evaluation Spotlight: Symposium investigates energy and maritime risk

The Coast Guard is partnering with academia, industry and government to provide cutting-edge training, education and awareness to its workforce. To aid those efforts, the Coast Guard Research, Development, Test and Evaluation Program is co-hosting the annual Maritime Risk Symposium with Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the National Academy of Science – Transportation Research Board. This year’s event is scheduled to be held Nov. 14-16, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Oak Ridge, Tennessee.


A Veterans Day rescue and remembrance

The U.S. Coast Guard Academy honors Academy graduates who are considered service heroes. This year, the Academy inducted Lt. Mark Feldman into the Wall of Gallantry for saving the lives of two plane crash survivors near Detroit on Veterans Day in 1986.


Honor, Respect, Devotion to Duty: Air Station Kodiak crew – Capt. Frank Erickson Award winners

The Coast Guard recently recognized an Air Station Kodiak aircrew with the Capt. Frank Erickson Award. The award is presented to a rotary-wing aircrew that has demonstrated exceptional performance while engaged in search and rescue operations. Earlier this year, the crew flew through excessive winds to medevac a patient off a Navy vessel and made a daring landing upon the Coast Guard Cutter John Midgett (WHEC-726) at over 230 mph ground speed and 16- to 18-foot waves. They were able to transfer the patient to awaiting emergency medical services personnel with their never-ending resolve to save a life.


The Long Blue Line: “Siempre Preparado” – operations of Revenue Cutter Algonquin

Revenue Cutter Algonquin, commissioned in 1898, was a re-assuring sight on San Juan’s waterfront for 13 years. It was known as “Siempre Preparado” for always being ready to resond to the needs of Puerto Rico and its citizens. The cutter and its crew participated in several medical and humanitarian missions, transported local dignitaries and government officials and fought fires along the harbor. Algonquin was later reassigned to Oregon, to the Navy during WWI and later to Alaska, never returning to the Caribbean but always “Siempre Preparados.”


Canadian Steamer Princess Sophia. Photo courtesy of Wikipedia.

Avoiding tragedy 100 years after Princess Sophia sinking

This year marks the 100th anniversary of the sinking of the Canadian passenger steamer Princess Sophia. Princess Sophia had run aground in southeast Alaska and was unable to deploy its lifeboats, taking down with it at least 353 people. Today the Coast Guard conducts modern cruish ship exams placing emphasis on crew proficiency during emergencies to avoid another tragedy like the Princess Sophia.


Honor, Respect, Devotion to Duty: Auxiliarist Joe Giannattasio

Joe Giannattasio has worn many hats in his life. Restaurateur, pharmaceutical company representative, purveyor of fine ice cream and mini golf – but it’s for the hats he wears in the Coast Guard Auxiliary he was selected to be the Coast Guard Auxiliary Member of the Year, out of 24,000 people


Photograph of the U.S. Life-Saving Service crew at Neah Bay, Washington Territory. The crew members were predominantly Makah Tribe members. U.S. Coast Guard Collection.

The Long Blue Line: Native Americans – one of the longest serving minorities in the Coast Guard

Native Americans from a variety of tribal nations have participated in the Coast Guard and its predecessor services since the beginning of the 19th century, representing the second earliest minority group to serve in the U.S. Coast Guard. Like all other service members, they walk the long blue line and their efforts have benefitted all who serve in the U.S. military, federal government, and the nation as a whole.


Coast Guardsman performs at World Series

If you watched Game 5 of the World Series, as tens of millions of people did, you’d have spotted a familiar blue uniform at the start of the game.


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