Coast Guard Station Fort Macon Fireman James D. Sanders, Jr., returns from a training excerise aboard a 47-foot Motor Lifeboat near Station Fort Macon, Friday, May 20, 2016.

Honor, Respect, Devotion to Duty: Fireman James D. Sanders, Jr.

He’s only been on the job for eight months but Fireman James D. Sanders, Jr., exemplifies the Coast Guard’s core values of honor, respect and devotion to duty as was evidenced by his swift actions in saving the lives of five women who fell into the water after a pier collapsed.


Olivier Jehl, a French sailor, shows off his EPIRB at Coast Guard Air Station Atlantic City, N.J., Monday, May 16, 2016, after he was rescued by the Coast Guard. Jehl was attempting a solo voyage from New York to the United Kingdom when his 21-foot sailboat struck a submerged object and sank, causing him to use his rescue raft, emergency position-indicating radio beacon and flares. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Chief Petty Officer Nick Ameen/released)

Calling for help: Do you have the right equipment?

Knowing how to reach the Coast Guard in an emergency is an important step in getting help quickly. Make sure you have the right equipment to make a distress call before hitting the water. Some reliable forms of communication include: VHF radio with digital selective calling, an emergency positioning indicating radio beacon and a person locator beacon.


Boat safety training is important for boaters of all experience levels. Statistics show that a greater percent of accidents involving fatalities occurred on boats where the boat operator had received no formal instruction on how to operate the vessel.

Boating Safety Course: Sign up, log on, learn how

Boat safety training is important for boaters of all experience levels. Statistics show that a greater percent of accidents involving fatalities occurred on boats where the boat operator had received no formal instruction on how to operate the vessel.


A Coast Guard petty officer and a civilian pose for a staged photo of someone being arrested for boating under the influence. Alcohol use is the leading contributing factor in boater deaths. Be part of Operation Dry Water by making a pledge to never boat under the influence. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class David R. Marin)

Boat safe, boat sober: Designate a sober skipper

Boating under the influence of alcohol or illegal drugs continues to be the primary contributing factor in fatal boating accidents where the primary cause was known. Alcohol was a contributing factor in 91 boating fatalities and 228 boating injuries in 2015.


Get your free vessel safety check today!

Vessel Safety Checks: Are you in compliance?

Getting a free vessel safety check ensures you are better prepared if something goes wrong while you’re out on the water and could save your life. The free VSC is performed at your boat – whether in a slip, at the launch ramp, or in your driveway – by a certified vessel examiner, at a mutually-convenient time, and usually takes 30 to 45 minutes, depending upon the size of your boat.


Leaders from across government, the Armed Forces and law enforcement came together at the Navy League’s Sea-Air-Space Exposition transnational organized crime panel to discuss these increases and the challenges the nation faces as a result. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Connie Terrell.

Partners join forces to take on transnational organized crime

Recently, leaders from across government, the Armed Forces and law enforcement came together at the Navy League’s Sea-Air-Space Exposition transnational organized crime panel to discuss increases of drugs, weapons, migrants, unaccompanied children and people with ties to terrorism into our country and the challenges the nation faces as a result.


2015 Lifejacket statistics

Life jacket wear: Live to love another day

A life jacket buys you time to catch your breath when you fall in the water. It buys you time to try to rescue yourself and get back on your boat or personal watercraft. Wear your life jacket and live to love them another day.


The crew of the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Donald Horsley salutes as the ship is brought to life during its commissioning at Coast Guard Sector San Juan, Puerto Rico May 20, 2016. The Donald Horsley is the Coast Guard's 17th Sentinel Class fast response cutter and the fifth of its kind to be homeported in San Juan, Puerto Rico. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Ricardo Castrodad.

Welcome to the fleet, Coast Guard Cutter Donald Horsley!

With a max speed of more than 28 knots and a range of nearly 3,000 nautical miles, the Coast Guard’s fast response cutters are crucial to curbing illegal maritime activity. The Coast Guard welcomed the 17th fast response cutter, U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Donald Horsley, to the fleet in the cutter’s new home port of San Juan, Puerto Rico, May 20, 2016.


HURRICANE KATRINA

Hurricanes are no joke – prepare yourself, family before it’s too late

Hurricane season officially begins in little more than a week from now, and runs June 1 through November 30. If history has taught us anything about hurricanes, it’s to never underestimate a storm’s power of destruction – take for instance Katrina (2005), Irene (2011) and Sandy (2012), which incurred a combined total of $168 billion in damages. According to the Wall Street Journal, of the top 10 costliest natural disasters in the U.S., eight of them have been hurricanes.


Honor, Respect, Devotion to Duty: Bob Florisi

Honor, Respect, Devotion to Duty: Chief Petty Officer Robert Florisi

“His lead-by-example and family-first leadership style, positively impacted not only his team, but members up and down the chain of command at Sector Corpus Christi,” said Lt. Cmdr. James Spitler, engineering officer, Sector Corpus Christi. That leadership style has set Chief Petty Officer Florisi, an aviation survival technician at Coast Guard Air Station Corpus Christi, Texas, apart at his unit. Florisi was recently recognized with the 2015 Master Chief Angela M. McShan Inspirational Leadership award. He was selected from a group of 32 other nominees nationwide.


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