The U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Healy (WAGB-20) in the ice, Oct. 3, 2018, about 715 miles north of Barrow, Alaska, in the Arctic. The Healy is in the Arctic with a team of about 30 scientists and engineers aboard deploying sensors and autonomous submarines to study stratified ocean dynamics and how environmental factors affect the water below the ice surface for the Office of Naval Research. The Healy, which is homeported in Seattle, is one of two ice breakers in U.S. service and is the only military ship dedicated to conducting research in the Arctic. U.S. Coast Guard photo by NyxoLyno Cangemi.

Coast Guard icebreaker crew completes second 2018 Arctic mission

The crew of the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Healy completed their second mission of their Arctic West Summer 2018 deployment Thursday, Oct. 18. Mission 1802 was a scientific mission to study stratified ocean dynamics in the Arctic (SODA) for the Office of Naval Research. Healy is one of two icebreakers in U.S. service that serves American interests in the region helping us better understand, plan and prepare for increased human activity.


A neighborhood outside Panama Beach City, Fla., recovers after Hurricane Michael tore through the area in October 2018. Courtesy photo.

Honor, Respect, Devotion to Duty: Lt. j.g. Aaron Black

Lt. j.g. Aaron Black answered the call for help when a shipmate he had only met once asked for help after Hurricane Michael tore through his neighborhood outside Panama City Beach, Florida. Black and other officers from Coast Guard flight school in Pensacola brought tools, fuel, water and food, and helped patch four roofs, cleared debris and damaged trees from the roads and yards. Black and his team’s selfless acts and tireless dedication made a true impact to his shipmate and others in the neighborhood.


A 1945 photograph of Cuyahoga in World War II haze gray paint scheme. U.S. Coast Guard photo.

The Long Blue Line: Cuyahoga – gone for 40 years, not forgotten

Coast Guard Cutter Cuyahoga began its career enforcing Prohibition laws and interdicting offshore liquor smugglers in 1926. It career ended as an Officer Candidate School teaching platform after a collision with a 521-foot bulk carrier in Chesapeake Bay in 1978. The Coast Guard will be honoring its fallen shipmates in ceremonies at the Coast Guard Academy in New London, Connecticut, and at Coast Guard Training Center Yorktown, Virginia, Oct. 19-20, 2018 – 40 years after its sinking.


Lt. j.g. Ryan Thomas, a marine Inspector at Coast Guard Sector Delaware Bay, walks below the Kaimana Hila, an 850-foot container ship being constructed in Philadelphia Shipyards, Oct. 4, 2018. The Kaimana Hila and the Daniel K. Inouye are the two largest container ship ever built in the United States. During ship construction the Coast Guard works with the ship builder, shipping company and registrar in a unified effort to make the ship as safe as possible for operation. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Seth Johnson.

How the Coast Guard supports maritime commerce and the ship-building industry

The U.S. Coast Guard works with the ship-building industry to evaluate safety and security of ships as well as ensure safety of life at sea for workers and those of the port and waterways of the U.S. With the increasing demand on maritime trade, the Coast Guard has published the Maritime Commerce Strategic Outlook that establishes three lines of effort. Check out the blog to learn more.


Members of Electronic Support Detachment Guam repair a generator at the Mt. Alutom radio site on Guam following Typhoon Mangkhut, Sept. 15, 2018. The generator is a back up power system for the Rescue 21 radio site. U.S. Coast Guard photo.

Communication and connectivity following Mangkhut: A Rescue 21 story

Category 5 Typhoon Mangkhut recently impacted the islands of Guam and Rota, a commonwealth of the U.S. It plunged 80 percent of Guam into darkness and all of Rota, flooded areas and destroyed aids to navigation and damaged the Rescue 21 VHF and microwave radio sites in Guam and Rota. The U.S. Coast Guard sent supplies and crews to Rota to provide aid to the community and repair and restore power to the radio sites that are used to listen for distress calls throughout the Mariana Islands. Read here to learn more about the Rescue 21 system and how this 21st century technology assists these small Pacific islands.


A law enforcement team from Coast Guard Cutter Bertholf (WMSL-750)consisting of Petty Officer 1st Class Jordan Baptiste, Petty Officer 1st Class Asher Thomas, Petty Officer 2nd Class Jean Latimer, Lt. j.g. Kenji Awamura and Petty Officer 3rd Class Brandon Scott, man the cutter's Over The Horizon (OTH) boat, Nov. 4, 2008, during law enforcement training. Team members train constantly to be proficient in their maritime law enforcement mission. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Henry G. Dunphy.

Research, Development, Test and Evaluation Spotlight: Night vision devices evaluation

The Coast Guard Research, Development, Test and Evaluation Program on behalf of the Office of Boat Forces recently completed a research project on newer night vision technology. As a result of that project, CG-731 developed policy and training that allows qualified Coast Guard pursuit coxswains operating the Coast Guard’s over the horizon cutter boats to use night vision technology in the execution of their missions.


First Class Cadet Evan Twarog

Honor, Respect, Devotion to Duty: First Class Cadet Evan Twarog

Through his own initiative to learn more about geospatial science and geographic information systems, First Class Cadet Evan Twarog learned about crisis mapping and how it can help during emergencies. During Hurricane Harvey, Twarog began working on taking posts from social media asking for help and placing them on a map to give first responders a location to search.


A rigid-hull inflatable small boat from the Coast Guard buoy tender Abbie Burgess speeds out to the site of the survey project. (Courtesy of Mr. Brian R. McMahon)

The Long Blue Line: Minots Ledge Lighthouse – the deadly “Lover’s Light”

On April 17, 1851, the newly constructed lighthouse at Minots Ledge collapsed into the sea surrounding the ledge killing both its lighthouse keepers. Located off the Massachusetts coast south of Boston, the failure of this state-of-the-art lighthouse had been in the making for years. The lighthouse was rebuilt and has withstood every subsequent gale, but the two keepers lost will remain an important chapter in the Coast Guard’s long blue line.


Crew members aboard Coast Guard Cutter Legare honor Signalman First Class Douglas Munro in a ceremony, Sept. 27, 2018. U.S. Coast Guard photo.

Crew of Coast Guard Cutter Legare honors a hero

In the North Atlantic Ocean with sea spray crashing over the bow, and taps playing over a ship’s sound system, the crew of the Legare gathered Thursday, Sept. 27, 2018, to honor the 76th anniversary of Signalman First Class Douglas Munro’s courageous sacrifice.


Petty Officer 3rd Class Donald Molony assists two survivors from the Empire State Building in New York City after an accidental allusion with a B-52 bomber aircraft. Courtesy photo.

Unsung Coast Guard hero’s daring Empire State Building rescue

Few people today know that on July 28, 1945, a large aircraft crashed into the Empire State Building. Fewer still know that the accident produced the world record for surviving an elevator fall and that the fall’s victim was rescued by a United States Coast Guardsman.


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